Nature, Environments, & Place in American Thought

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This photo shows the construction of Carswell Hall, with the framework of both Reynolda Hall and Wait Chapel looming in the background. This area, once covered with lush vegetation, was reduced to piles of dirt susceptible to soil erosion and…

A first step to improving harmony involved identifying and rectifying past abuses. The Office of Sustainability discovered that the university’s construction destroyed the natural vegetation that once served as a habitat and feeding ground for…

Wake Forest’s previous culture embraced low-cost, preservative-filled foods produced thousands of miles away and shipped to campus. This system actually utilizes more energy to produce and transport the food than there is energy within the…

Harmony with the environment requires a complete change in the American throwaway culture, which embraces one-use items before relegating them to a landfill for thousands of years. The recycling program at Wake Forest has promoted efforts to decrease…

While recycling is a step in the right direction, avoiding throwaway products altogether is a more effective solution. The high-tech water filters scattered throughout campus are just one opportunity to diminish Wake Forest’s impact on the…

The change in Wake Forest’s culture cannot be achieved through community gardens, butterfly protection areas, and sustainable living alone; it also requires an accompanying change in attitude. Student activists are working to change the mindset…

Olympic National Park, Washington. Instead of attempting to alter the natural world around them, the subjects experience mankind’s most basic relationship with nature, which involves observing the natural world around them with awe and a…

Human expansion is ever increasing, and as it grows it turns the natural intricacies of age-old rock formations into systematically pruned lots of land. A defining point in man and nature’s relationship is when they no longer live in harmony…

The human depletion of natural resources is yet another way in which assert our dominance over nature. Oil companies and other corporations only seek to profit off our need for energy without any care for what it may do to impact the rest of the…

Our toxic relationship with the environment, however, goes beyond just single harmful events. The release of carbon gases into the atmosphere have created an entire future of environmental problems. Just as Thomas Cole depicted the progression from…
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