Summer Entrepreneurial Experiences

Author Archive

Finishing touches :)

Saturday, July 28, 2012 4:27 pm

This week I finished added in the images to the old leaves. Then I was given the task of moving all the image citations for each leaf into a new Credit tab so they did not clutter the content section. To do this I had to add in coding to make the new tab and then I copied and pasted all the citations into the new tab. To make sure it was clear which citations went with which picture all images were duplicated under the new tab as well. The Author and Revised sections were also moved into the new Credit tab before all of the image credits. An example of what content was put under a Credits tab is listed below:

Author: Mike Farabee, Sabrina Setaro
Revised:

Image Credits:

Image: unkown; Public Domain;Original image – high resolution


Image created by Tiffany Blackburn; Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0)

Original artwork within image comes from the following authors and sources:

Tracey Saxby, Integration and Application Network, University of
Maryland Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/);
The IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely cost
and royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or
sales.
Cardinalis cardinalis
Ardea
herodias

Ajaja ajaja
Agelaius
phoeniceus

Centrocercus sp.
Dendrobates pumilio
Octocoral
Gorgonian sea fan
Cicindela dorsalis media
Saimiri
sp.

Orcinus orca
Helix aspersa
Laboea
strobila

Paramecium aurelia

Joanna Woerner, Integration and Application Network, University of
Maryland Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/);
The IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely cost
and royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or
sales.
Dendroica cerulea
Picoides
pubescens

Octocoral
Polygonum cespitosum

Jane Hawkey, Integration and Application Network, University of Maryland
Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/); The
IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely cost and
royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or
sales.
Coccyzus americanus

Jane Thomas, Integration and Application Network, University of Maryland
Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/); The
IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely cost and
royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or
sales.
Anas platyrhynchos
Limulus polyphemus

Kim Kraeer, Luck Van Essen-Fishman, Integration and Application Network,
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
(ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/); The IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries
are provided completely cost and royalty free for any use, with
attribution, except redistribution or sales.
Buteo lineatus Natator
depressa

Eumeces fasciatus

Dieter Tracey, Integration and Application Network, University of
Maryland Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/);
The IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely cost
and royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or
sales.
Epinephelus tukula Macropus
rufus

Sara Klips, Integration and Application Network, University of Maryland
Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/); The
IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely cost and
royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or
sales.
Lumbricus sp.

As you can see there are a lot of citations for the pyramid image (which i mentioned in an earlier post). This list is actually what lead Sabrina and Dr. Johnson to brainstorm other ways of citing images rather than just including them in the text. The task of moving over all citations was tedious but I’m sure the students will appreciate the less cluttered content sections.

Making all the Credits tabs took a lot of time but I completed it before the week was over. I then found and added images to three new leaves. However, these leaves, while important to complete soon, are notamongthe most important things to finish before the end of the summer. Thus, after I completed these leaves I was switched over to working on content related problems. Within each leaf there were supposed to be links to reference sources and internal links to other similar leaves. However, the vast majority of these links had not been added. In the text you would see a [1] where a link to reference 1 was supposed to be but the link would not work. In order to link to reference 1 I had to copy the URL for reference one and insert it before the 1 so that the link looked like [www…|1] in the editing view. Once the link was inserted and saved in normal mode the link still looked like [1] but when u clicked on the 1 it took you to the proper website. This process was similar for adding internal links I just had to take the leaf that was to be linked and format it like this, ((A000…|Leaf: …?)) where the A number was filled in and the name of the leaf was inserted after the colon.

In addition to fixing links I also made sure spacing for the leaf was uniform and that all references and learning goals were presented in the same form. The references were all listed with a *1., *2., etc. before the reference information and the learning goals were all listed with * * at the beginning of each goal.

I am not quite finished with fixing the links and spacing in all the leaves but finishing should not take long. I also need to write up an explanation of the format and process with which each task was completed this summer and embed a few more images that Morgan is working on into the BioBook website. However, there really is not too much work left to complete and I am officially done with my time doing research at Wake this summer. I am thankful that I had the opportunity to work on such a fulfilling project and I look forward to continuing my work this coming school year. I hope everyone else has a good rest of their summer,

Tiffany

Wrapping Up

Saturday, July 21, 2012 2:36 pm

This past week I was assigned the task of looking over the citations for all the images currently up on BioBook. This took a few days but it was a very important task. Many of the earliest leaves had images and citations that were uploading and written in a completely different way than our current one. For these images I had to embed them using Bluehost and then reformat the citations. I had some difficulty with the dropbox folders on these leaves being mislabeled or put in the wrong place. Finding and relabeling these dropbox folders was important to ensure that the licensing information I put online was correct and to make sure that other people in the future can easily find and check over the information.

Another common problem I encountered were citations that were completely missing; they were either not on BioBook or not on BioBook nor in the text documents where citation information is kept. For these uncited images I looked for the information in dropbox and if it was not their I had to relocate them online and then document their licencing information and add it to BioBook and dropbox. Rarely the image could not be found and I had to replace it altogether.

Many citations for group pictures were ordered wrong and images that were modified did not list who modified them in the citation. These two problems, in addition to very minor differences like the placement of commas or parenthesis, were the most frequent issues. I took my time going over the citations so that I would catch all these errors and I documented on TikiList when I had completed each revision.

Sporadically throughout the week I also uploaded images that Morgan had drawn. Sabrina also gave me the task of taking a video series on evolution that she had found and going through them and judging which video segments corresponded with which BioBook leaves. After going through the videos I found 13 different leaves that the video content applied to. I then went through each of these leaves and uploaded the video that correlated to Extras, changing the video code so that the video started where the material that waspertinent to that leaf began. In the video legend I listed the time where the video stopped covering information for that section. Altogether this little task only took a few hours but it was a refreshing break from editing citations.

At the end of the week I finished the citations and I was put to converting and cleaning up transfer leaves. Currently on BioBook leaf 1 is uploaded but then the content skips to leaf 92. The leaves I was working on are the leaves in-between; they were written last summer and had been sitting on Dr. Johnson’s Mac. Our last important task as a team this summer is to take these leaves and upload them to BioBook and then add in the images. After I converted the text files and deleted all unnecessary files in the folders for the new leaves, Jessica and Sabrina took over uploading the leaves onto BioBook. My job transitioned to taking the images in the folders and writing out their citations then uploading them onto BioBook. Only the source of each image was listed in the files so I had to go to each webpage to get the citation information for each image. Originally we had expected all the images to be open source but I uncovered a few that were not. For these images I worked to quickly replace them or, if this was impossible, I simply documented the problem in TikiList and moved on. I still have many of these transfer files to work on but hopefully I can complete them next week. Its hard to believe that there is only one week left!

Tiffany

Almost done

Monday, July 16, 2012 9:50 pm

This past week I pretty much finished the old material and I began completing images for new leaves as they were uploaded. Like last week there were not many images to draw and so most of my time was spend just finding opensource images. I was able to make one intricate image and remake a few others. The image I started from scratch was for the succession leaf: Sabrina asked that I draw a line of plants that display the process of secondary succession. The process started with pioneer plants and then continued on to include perennial plants and grasses, shrubs and woody pioneers, short-lived pioneer trees, and a mature forest with some overlap between the groups. I drew the plants until I got to the last two sections; for the trees I used opensource images available online. The image turned out okay but it is not completed yet: Sabrina still wants to add labels she is just unsure about exactly what she wants to label yet.

Image: Tiffany Blackburn;Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

Image(Little tree):Tracey Saxby, Integration and Application Network, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science; The IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely cost and royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or sales. Required Attribution: Author Name, Integration and Application Network, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/);Original image – high resolution

Image(Big tree):Dieter Tracey, Integration and Application Network, University of MarylandCenter for Environmental Science; The IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely costand royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution or sales. Required Attribution: Author Name, Integration and Application Network,University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/);Original image – high resolution

Image(Shrub):Tracey Saxby, Integration and Application Network, University of MarylandCenter for Environmental Science; The IAN/UMCES Symbol and Image Libraries are provided completely costand royalty free for any use, with attribution, except redistribution orsales. Required Attribution: Author Name, Integration and Application Network,University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (ian.umces.edu/imagelibrary/);Original image – high resolution

The images that I redrew were made by Dr. Johnson but were notalignedand needed sometweaking. For example, in the image shown below all the arrows were originally blue but for clarity Sabrina thought the ”too low” side should be blue and the “too high” side should be red. The image took a little while to make because all the arrows, boxes, and text were aligned and sized as similarly as possible (To make sure that the words could be read I had to insert it full size).

Image: AD Johnson, Sabrina Setaro, Tiffany Blackburn;Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

This coming week the only old images that are really left are the ones that are impossible for me to find and that will likely have to be rethought or erased. Thus next week I will likely be doing organizing/ editing of the images and the image information spreadsheet in addition to making new images. Organization and refinement are important and time-consuming tasks that will likely make up a lot of my coming week’s work.

Tiffany

 

Still on the Old Material

Monday, July 9, 2012 9:35 pm

Last week I did not finish the old material as I expected too. There was a lot more unfinished leaves than I had originally thought. Thus, I spent the week finding and making images for a broad range of topics from cell types to animal symmetry. To keep up with the completion status of each leaf, Sabrina made a spreadsheet of the leaves and documented whether the content, images, extras, andassessments were started or completed for each individual leaf. Using her spreadsheet as a guide,I completed a large number of leaves because most images required only an open source image and no drawing or editing was really required. That being said, I was able to draw a few cool images. For the animal symmetry leaf I was able to draw a luna moth and a starfish. I had started the luna moth during the school year but had left it after completing only half of a wing. The starfish had been started by the other student artist, Morgan, but she too had left hers incomplete. It is difficult to draw the same way as someone else so I changed some of what she did and then completed the image. The luna moth demonstrates bilateral symmetry and the starfish demonstrates radial symmetry. Both images are shown below.

Image 1: Tiffany Blackburn;Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

Image 2: Tiffany Blackburn, Morgan Burt;Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

There are still a lot of old images still to do and it is doubtful that we will get done with it this coming week. However, a large chunk was done this past week.

Tiffany

Last of the Old Material

Sunday, July 1, 2012 1:11 am

This week I worked on the last of the old leaves that had not been started and I began to go back to leaves that were unfinished. Thus, most of my week consisted of me finding and editing open source images; there were no ‘fun’ projects to work on. Sabrina was sorry that I did not have any plants or animals to draw; however, I still enjoyed my work and accomplished a lot. One of the first images I did involved lactic acid fermentation and ethanol fermentation. There was an okay open source image of lactic acid fermentation available but nothing on ethanol fermentation. Since the basic ethanol reaction is public information; I used the lactic acid image as a basic guide and was able to alter it to make the ethanol image. I redrew the entire images so that the lines would be smoother and I inserted the symbols for ATP and ADP that I used for earlier images. The final images are shown below.

Both have the following license: Sjantoni modified by Tiffany Blackburn; Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

After going through several leaves Sabrina and I noticed that history leaves were consistently difficult to find images or make images for and we discussed how to fix the problem. Since the BioBook textbook is for nonmajors we decided to make the history leaves second priority and focus on finding images for other leaves that were definitely required for classes as not all teachers cover all the history. After working this out I focused on trying to find microscopic images that I could not find the first time I went through the leaves. I found more than expected because I have become better at searching for them and because Dr. Johnson created a long list of websites that could be sorted through when Creative Commons did not turn up any usable images.

My favorite image of the week was an image about the different components found in blood. For this image I found a good open source image of atest tubethat showed bloodseparatedinto layers. However, the image lacked labels and Sabrina thought it would be good to add in the labels and a real microscopic image of each of the components so that students could more easily relate the diagram to real life and grasp the significance. This was not a difficult task and I think the final image is more helpful than a simply labeled diagram.

Image(TestTube): finder modified by Tiffany Blackburn; Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0);Original image – high resolution

Image(erythrocytes): Sundar, National Institutes of Health; Public Domain;Original image – high resolution

Image(leukocytes): Patho, an officer or employee of the United States Government; Public Domain;Original image – high resolution

Image(platelets): Tleonardi; Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0);Original image – high resolution

Next week I will hopefully pretty much finish the old leaves and move on to new ones. The image component of the BioBook project is going slower than the content component but we can hopefully still finish by the end of July. I’ve enjoyed my first month; it flew by.

Tiffany

 

Making Progess

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 1:26 am

This week I began by finishing the flowers/fungi needed for a diagram Sabrina was making for a leaf she was working on. These were a Convolvulaceae(Ipomoea pes-caprae) and a monotropa uniflora. The montropa was difficult because it was solid white in color so making the differentiation between the flower petals and stems was almost impossible. The Convolvulacae was much easier to draw and I finished it quickly. These two images and one other one were added to the flower in my last post for Sabrina’s diagram.

Tiffany Blackburn;Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

After I finished these two images I spent most of the week working through photosynthesis leafs and cellular content. Most leafs I was unable to completely finish because they required microscopic images or detailed images I could not find online. For example, for one leaf I needed an electron microscope image of an ATP synthase, a structure that makes ATP. In addition, some images were hard to make because Dr. Johnson was away at a conference and so if Sabrina and I could not figure out exactly what sort of an image he wanted from the description, we made a note of it and moved on.

Tiffany Blackburn;Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

Friday afternoon I was ready to draw another animal/plant so Sabrina let me draw a male and female Indigo Bunting. These pictures were for the section on population and breeding and so she also wanted variations of the real birds with green wings and yellow beaks for an illustration about Mate Selection. The completed sets are shown above.

Hopefully this coming week we will be able to sort through the images that we were unclear about and find the microscopic images we need. I look forward to the last week of my first month!

First Problems

Tuesday, June 19, 2012 12:33 am

At the very beginning of last week I finished up the Chemistry content and moved on to the Cell section. I quickly found this section very difficult because a lot of microscope images are needed for the content but I could not find many opensource images online. This lead to searching on numerous sites and trying to supplement missing images with videos. However, this did not fix the problem. Since it is not feasible for the team to make all the microscope images required, Dr. Johnson, the head of the project, has taken responsibility for trying to find images through sites he uses and through asking faculty here if they can help.

After determining what to do for the microscope images I focused on finding other necessary images. One of the pictures needed was of a model of DNA compared to a model of RNA. I found good images online; however, Sabrina felt the images coloring was confusing and thus needed to be changed. None of us know how to do this in illustrator so Dr. Johnson showed me how to using Photoshop. All you had to do was decide the color you wanted, make sure it was dark enough to cover up the darkest color, and color over the image in an Overlay layer. It was fairly easy and I was glad to learn how to do it. To clarify the difference between single stranded RNA and double-stranded DNA, Sabrina wanted the RNA all one color and the DNA two different colors. Below is the DNA and RNA images before and after recoloring.

Shape of DNA(left) and tRNA(right).

Image(left): mstroeck; Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0);Original image – high resolution

Image(right): Yikrazuul; Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0);Original image – high resolution

Last week just like last week Sabrina gave me a few fun tasks to work on. I was able to make a taxonomy pyramid for the cardinal and draw a Neottia Nidus-Avis, shown below, for the phylogeny section. This coming week I am looking forward to doing more phylogeny pictures and working more on the next section.

Tiffany

Tiffany Blackburn; Attribution-ShareAlike3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

(Photos Drawn From) pedromiramis; Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

BerndH; Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

 

One Busy Week

Sunday, June 10, 2012 10:29 pm

This past week I grew accustomed to my new work requirements and I created, edited, and uploaded a lot of pictures. Primarily I focused on the Chemistry content this week and thus many of my images were molecules and reactions. For these molecules my boss Sabrina and I decided that consistency was important for students and thus we created every molecule to ensure all bonds, shapes, and colors were the same for each image. All carbons were made black, oxygens were red, bonds were green, and so on as displayed in the image below.

Image: Tiffany Blackburn; Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

tRNA Image: Kyle Schneider; Public Domain;Original image – high resolution

Fruit Image: Jon Sullivan; Public Domain;Original image – high resolution

This image is for the monosaccharides content. It shows the chemical structures for three important molecules: ribose, glucose, and fructose, and an example of each one so that students can hopefully connect them to things they know. The tRNA image and fruit image were found using Creative Commons. The tRNA image had extra writing on it that was unnecessary for our purposes and thus I removed it. I created the energy drink image so that BioBook would not unintentionally promote any particular energy drink company. It was difficult to do the slanted writing and thus the image is not the best but it hopefully serves its purpose. On any particular day I did about three of these images, depending on how much of the image I had to create myself.

To give me a break from the Chemistry images, Sabrina also allowed me to also create a liverwort and a siren this week. These two images (displayed below) were important for different Earth clocks. In the content discussing animals and plants, Sabrina and another member of the BioBook team, Morgan, have been making clocks that show when different animal and plants groups first appeared on Earth. While I did not greatly contribute to these clocks I was thrilled to be able to contribute in a small way.

Image 1 : Tiffany Blackburn; Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

Image 2: Tiffany Blackburn; Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

I enjoyed this week and I’m looking forward to this coming one!

Tiffany

BioBook: Working with Digital Images

Saturday, June 2, 2012 2:31 am

The Adapa Project is a non-profit organization that is in the process of being launched. The project seeks to make science content easier for students to understand through the creation of online textbooks that utilize images and supplements to complement the text. Currently, the project is focused on the creation of a non-majors edition of BioBook that contains introductory level Biology material. The goal of the project is to have a completed version of this online book by August 1.

My responsibilities for the project revolve around the image component. Currently my job is to find and insert images onto already written and uploaded text selections. This involves searching for usable images on the web, meaning the images have to be scientifically correct but simple to understand and opensourced or copyrighted with a licence that permits non-profit company use. To simplify this search I use the Creative Commons website because I can stipulate that the search be restricted to copyrights that the project can use. When I find the image(s) I then revise,re-size, and oftentimes group the images together using Adobe Illustrator CS4. As I find the images I am careful to immediately note the licensing information for the image. At this point I upload the images to the web and then embed them directly into the BioBook website. (I can also use this method to find and upload videos and I will likely do so soon). Below is an example of an image grouping I put together. I added the text in the water molecule and found/re-sized all the images.

Water on Earth and Mars

Water on Earth and Mars

Image 1: fogonthedowns; Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0);Original image – high resolutions

Image 2: Travis S.; Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0);Original image – high resolution

Image 3: NASA, JPL, Malin Space Science Systems; public domain; public domain;Original image – high resolution

Image 4: NASA, JPL, Malin Space Science Systems; public domain;Original image – high resolution

I have worked on BioBook since January of this year. However, up to this point I had only worked on creating new images. This summer I will be able to make new images as before, alongside learning about and helping with the other responsibilities required to ensure that the BioBook images complement the text, are easy for students to comprehend, and are properly formatted and sized with-in the BioBook website.

I work with a great team including Dr. Johnson, Dr. Sabrina Setaro, and two other students, one of which is my twin sister Jessica. I am privileged to get to work with them and to be a part of The Adapa Project. I sincerely believe, as do the other members of the team, that this project will reform science education and increase students’ learning and appreciation for the sciences. Looking forward to next week,

Tiffany

Authors
Alexander Adcock (7)
Gracious Addai (3)
Susie Alexander (6)
Assel Aljaied (10)
Megan Archey (7)
Kenneth Bailey (6)
Marco Banfi (3)
Johanna Beach (8)
Jessica Blackburn (8)
Tiffany Blackburn (9)
Meredith Bragg (9)
Quentin Brillantes (8)
Samuel Buchanan (5)
Robbie Bynum (1)
Cailey Forstall (9)
Cameron Steitz (5)
Cecelia Carchedi (2)
Carl Turner (1)
Adelina Cato (5)
Kristi Chan (7)
Brittani Chavious (12)
Avinav Chopra (1)
Hannah Clark (8)
Kathryn Covino (8)
Sarah Crosier (8)
Keshav Daga (8)
Jennifer Daye (7)
Mike Dempsey (8)
Eva Dickinson (2)
Will Dietsche (8)
Catherine Douglas (8)
Zanny Dow (8)
Stephen Eason (8)
Elisa Burton (1)
Epiphany Espinosa (5)
Hannah Shows (8)
Nina Foster (5)
Hannah Gable (8)
Charlie Garner (8)
Kent Garrett (8)
Nicholas Gomez-Garcia (8)
Gracie Wiener (6)
Brooks Hall (7)
Meghan Hall (7)
Tim Han (1)
Adrienne Henderson (1)
Ryon Huddleston (7)
Adeolu Ilesanmi (8)
Nicole Irving (8)
Jessica (8)
Dalton Jones (8)
Kevin Wang (5)
Ty Kraniak (11)
Nick Ladd (15)
Elizabeth Lane (8)
Yuan-Chih Lee (8)
Kenneth Lowery (5)
Duncan MacDougall (6)
Lauren Martinez (7)
John McMurray (8)
Megan Miller (5)
Colt Mienke (1)
Brad Neal (9)
David O'Connor (9)
Olivia Wolff (3)
Kristen Plantz (8)
Lucy Rawson (7)
Cynthia Redwine (6)
Julia Reed (8)
Matt Roemer (8)
Melissa Ryon (3)
Eleanor Saffian (8)
Kayla Santos (8)
Maddie Saveliff (2)
Lisa Shaffer (8)
Ben Smith (10)
Christian Spake (8)
Ollie Spalding (8)
Alan Spencer (8)
Anna Tal (8)
Shelby Taylor (8)
Jake Teitelbaum (5)
Segen Tekle (1)
Katherine Thomas (8)
Tommy Lisiak (8)
Travis McCall (8)
Jawad Wahabzada (5)
Kurt Walker (4)
Kristen Watkins (2)
Jonathan Williams (8)
Sathya Williams (1)
Katie Winokur (8)
Elaheh Ziglari (8)
Jenna Zimmerman (8)
ZSR (1)
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