Professional Development

Rethinking Reference Collections

Friday, October 21, 2011 4:19 pm

Today, I completed a four week online course title “Rethinking Reference Collections” which was offered by Infopeople and was taught by Dave Tyckoson, Associate Dean of the Library at the University of California, Fresno. Dave spent many years as a reference librarian and is still a reference librarian at heart! One of my new job responsibilities is collection management of our reference collection, so Roz encouraged me to take this course and Lynn very generously provided funding. The timing of this course fortuitously came just as we are preparing for a massive weeding of the reference collection in preparation for the consolidation of the reference and circulation desks next year.

There were 74 participants for this course coming from a wide variety of libraries from small public libraries to Stanford and UCLA (most libraries represented were from California). Here are the highlights of what I learned:

  1. The first week, the punch line was: All librarianship is local!! It is our responsibility to tailor our collections to the needs of our community.
  2. The second week we did usage studies of our reference collections. Thanks to Carol Cramer, I learned that we have 9,994 unique titles in our collection and 22,704 volumes. Tim Mitchell graciously created an Excel spreadsheet of our usage for the week; the spreadsheet was used as a model in our WebEx class for how to manipulate the data to make decisions about what to weed from our collections. That week, we had 148 titles scanned in from Reference. As Dave observed, we have a highly used collection, particularly in our religion section (no surprise to any of us who work at the reference desk). Having all reference materials bar coded is the optimal way to assess usage. Hats off to those who thought of bar coding the reference collection and implemented the system-you earned a star for our library in this class!.
  3. The second week, we also compared print and electronic resources. We were given access to the online version of World Book as well as Oxford Reference Online. What struck me about both online sources was how far we are from seeing the power of the web in reference resources! The Oxford Reference materials are just the print materials put online (similar to the Gale Reference Sources). There are no updates, videos, visuals, etc. World Book is better, but still very much like the print with some links thrown in to websites and videos. The online reference materials are still very bland and usually no more up-to-date than what we have on our shelves. While access is much more convenient through the web, the presentation is no better. As more libraries move to electronic sources, it is my hope that publishers will seriously upgrade the content and presentations! They are competing with Wikipedia, shouldn’t Oxford Reference be and look more cutting edge? I will say the same for Gale Virtual Reference, our current electronic reference resource of choice. Can they please upgrade their products to be more than reprints from their print collections?
  4. The third week he introduced the concept of circulating reference materials. It seems that the current trend is to allow reference materials to circulate for 3 days at a time. Dave advocates creating a ready reference collection that does not circulate and then allowing all other reference materials to circulate. He suggests putting the circulating reference materials in the main stacks with special marking on the books for 3 day check out. This was something I had not really thought about and I’m still chewing on the idea for our collection. It is clear to me that we have many reference books that will need to be in our ready reference collection. The question is whether or not we need the 3 day check out option for the books we move to the stacks, or should they just circulate like regular titles?
  5. The current trend is to move to electronic resources while print reference collections are shrinking. However, he predicts that as we allow reference books to circulate, the use of print reference materials will go up.
  6. Another thing to ponder is how we will promote the use of our reference resources. I plan to do some informal usability testing with our students at the reference desk to see if they have a clue about where to go to find encyclopedia articles from our Databases page. Do they know what Gale Virtual Reference Library contains? I’m putting this on my to do list for the second half of the semester!
  7. The last helpful piece of this course was learning that there are tools that will specifically search reference collections. One is called Paratext and it searches electronic and print collections. The next one is Credo Reference and it searches across all electronic reference materials. These tools are seriously meeting a need and I wish we had Paratext (though I have never seen it in real life). I wish we could get Summon to easily navigate and limit to our reference sources; that is something we will probably see by the time Summon 10.0 is released!

Overall, I really enjoyed this course and the online learning environment! Thank you, Roz and Lynn for making this possible!

ALA: The Long Term Impact

Tuesday, July 5, 2011 12:41 pm

This is my last ALA Conference post, and it could have just as well been called Connecting and Working.

This was the best ALA conference for me since Chicago, or maybe ever. Part of it was the chance to be involved with things I care a lot about. But a larger part was the people. I love conferences and look forward to them for the chance to see friends that only cross paths every six months. I try to catch up with folks for lunch, over dinner, in meetings, and at happy hours. I had some great conversations and some left me ready for Midwinter already.

Several of these conversations generated projects that I think will be fun to do, have direct benefits for my job, and could be useful for the field.

One of these projects will be based on web design and has been brewing since before Leif was born. Both of us are now in a place to work on the project, so we were able to hammer out a few next actions to get the ball rolling.

Another came up over coffee when I was talking about reframing how to think about reference based on experiences I’ve had as an interdisciplinary liaison. My co-conspirator agreed and had been thinking of something similar, so we’re going to do a project around it.

Several of us talked about pooling perspectives to do a piece on effective webinar design. We can tackle it from the angles of best practices, instructional design, and aspractitionerswho both have given and participated in them.

So all in all, a lot of good projects will come out of this relatively short time.

It’s something that I mulled over when I was seeing tweets from really good programs. I worried I wasn’t getting enough out of the conference for Wake Forest. But then I realized what I was getting out of this particular conference were projects that will inform the work I do at Wake just as much as if I were to sit in on a session and learn about what others have done. And the meetings that spurred these projects wouldn’t have happened if I weren’t at ALA.

The hardest thing about coming back from ALA is having a week of catch up to do, and THEN to do the ALA work. I’m going to do everything in my power not to drop the ball on these projects, though, since I feel really good about the potential outcomes.

ALA was an incredible conference for me this year, from the events I did attend to the meetings I participated in to the conversations and the long term projects that will come out of it. But for now, I have to get through this inbox so I can act on all these new ideas!

(cross posted to laurenpressley.com)

ACRL OnPoint Chat Series: “Are Reference Desks Passé?”

Wednesday, July 29, 2009 2:52 pm

On Wednesday, July 29th, Mary Scanlon and I participated in the ACRL OnPoint Chat series, “Are Reference Desks Passé?” While no definitive conclusion was reached, many salient points were discussed. The format of this series was a Meebo Chatroom with 80 participants. Two parallel threads emerged during the 45 minute conversation: the medium and the provider of reference service.

The title challenged people to discuss different service points and varying technologies available for users. Service points included the traditional stand-alone reference desk, a single service point (reference and circulation) or virtual service points which included Twitter, IM, VOIP, video, text, email, walkie talkies, Vocera devices and software such as LibraryH3lp, Google Voice, and others. By and large the librarians in the discussion found that faculty were not users of chat clients, while undergraduates used both chat and text. No consensus was reached regarding the necessity of a reference desk, but many excellent questions were raised.

Who should staff the desk was the other dominant theme in the conversation. Current solutions ran the full spectrum, but a recurring theme was the de-professionalization of the desk staff. Numerous libraries are using a triage model to refer difficult questions to subject specialists. Another aspect of this discussion was that embedded widgets throughout a library’s website were viewed to be a powerful way to drive traffic to subject specialists.

As first-time participants in a chat session like this, both Mary and I were struck by the chaotic nature of the format. Participants were answering multiple questions simultaneously, creating a challenging discussion environment. However, in spite of these challenges, it was possible to see the overarching themes emerge and glean the experiences of other academic libraries. If you would like to see the transcript it can be found at: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/onpoint/index.cfm

ACRL OnPoint Discussion

REFolution Day 2

Thursday, April 16, 2009 10:47 am

Moving Beyond the Reference Desk

This first session of the day was two presentations on how two different libraries have shifted the focus of their customer service away from the reference desk and the reference department and are meeting their patrons where they are.

Have Laptop Will Travel- Pat Dawson (Rider University)

Dawson is the science librarian at Rider, and in order to interact more with students taking science courses, she decided to have set hours in the science student study lounge in the science building. In order to not conflict with possible BI sessions (ie, the professor woudn’t schedule a session if they thought she would be providing this service), she set up times later in the semester, around Thanksgiving. Dawson posted signs in the study lounge letting students know when she would be having office hours there, and she emailed faculty members so they could announce in their classes.

Dawson ended up having some student contact during her sessions, but also felt that the faculty contact she had was just as valuable. She was able to meet with several new faculty members and set up library sessions for the following spring semester. She felt that the timing around Thanksgiving wasn’t right for the students, so she is planning on having the sessions several weeks before Thanksgiving in Fall 2009.

How We Stopped Manning the Fort and Became Virtual- Kate McGivern (Bergen Community College)

McGivern discussed several ways in which they have modified their reference area and services to be more accessible to their student population. During larger library renovations, they replaced their “fortress” desk with a low, dumbell, shaped desk. This made the desk more approachable and gave them more work stations where they could consult with students. They also added butterfly monitors so that students could see the searches more easily. (This is similar to what we have done over the last few years with our desk.) They also sent their entire reference collection to the stacks, and over the summer will make them circulating titles.

The reference librarians have also started doing “roaming” and “embedded” librarianship. Their usual staffing schedule is to have two librarians at the desk during a shift. One of those librarians is supposed to roam the library to see if there are patrons that need help. They wear nametags but don’t carry any sort of communication or handheld device. McGivern indicated (I think!) that their layout was such that they could see the service points from anywhere in the building (two floors) and that there were workstations on both floors that they could take patrons to if they needed extensive help (beyond deciphering LC and locating a book in the stacks). The embedded librarians were participants in courses via Blackboard. They created a “Librarian on Board” icon for those courses and the librarian had full access to the Blackboard course.

Both speakers highlighted their use of the book, The Desk and Beyond: Next Generation Reference Service by Sarah K. Steiner and M. Leslie Madden (Z675 U5 D425 2008, Reference Office).

Sending Out an SMS: Exploring Reference Via Text Messaging with Mobile Devices- Joe Murphy (Yale University)

Murphy discussed the implementation of texting services at the six Yale science libraries, and the evolution of text services in general. He strongly stressed the importance of text and mobile services to our student populations, several times saying that that was the main way that he got information. Our students are very comfortable with these methods of communication, but sometimes we are not. If libraries plan on implementing text services, we need to make sure that we manage staffing, cost and student expectations. We need to make sure we are answering questions as effieciently as possible, especially for those students who don’t have unlimited texting (ie, don’t answer the question as if it was an email, don’t assume that all students have unlimited texting). He also sees texting moving beyond reference services into other library services, such as catalog searching and overdue notices.

During the lunch break, there were two vendor presenations (AltaRama and Reference Universe) and time to look at vendor displays. I picked up information from Reference Universe, Credo Reference, LexisNexis and AltaRama.

AltaRama- Arthur Brady

AltaRama is another product that was designed by librarians, and the name is an aboriginal word for “the act of finding.” They have several different components and you can purchase them as a package or only the particular components that you need. The different components are: DeskStats, RefChatter (uses Library H3lp), RefTracker, RefScheduler, SMSReference and VRLPlus. He emphasized that they are all very customizible to each library.

Reference Universe- LuAnn Harrison

The Reference Universe product from Paratext has taken the indexes and articles from the major reference publishers (Gale, ABC-CLIO, etc…) and created an online database so that their contents are now searchable. Additionally, they have included the current online content from these publishers, making over 20 million citations searchable at the same time.

OK, This is Just too Weird- Elizabeth Edwards (George Washington University)

The last presentation of the conference was an interesting one discussing the Gelman Libraries study of Facebook use on their campus, and specifically, how students percieved the use of Facebook by the library and librarians. They worked with a graduate student in the anthropology department to do an ethnographic study of the student population. He did surveys and informal interviews with students who responded to a Facebook ad, a library webpage ad, or a Facebook group email. Most of the students felt that Facebook was a purely social space, the only academically related activity they used it for was to set up study group meetings. This made it difficult for students to understand why “authority” figures such as professors, librarians, or even family members, would be in that space, and it made them uncomfortable, but they weren’t sure why. When they looked at librarian facebook profiles, they liked the profiles that already matched what they thought librarians were like, i.e., included book recommendations, research tips, but not when they included personal information (though, interestingly, they felt like they were invading the librarians’ personal space). She recommended considering student perceptions of the library, taking the time to ask them how they felt about the library and Facebook as a social space, as this survey was specific to the George Washington student population, and other campuses could be very differerent.

Again, if anyone has questions or would like more information about any of the presentations, let me know! Lyrasis is supposed to post the powerpoints and other documents soon, so I can forward that to anyone who is interested.

Harrisburg Airport fun fact: In addition to a much-appreciated Starbucks and a lovely, non-desiel-fume- smelling waiting area, the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant is located at the end of the runway! Somehow I missed it when I arrived!

REFolution Day 1

Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:58 pm

On Monday and Tuesday, April 6-7, I attended the REFolution: Reference Service in a Constantly Changing World conference in Hershey, PA. It was a busy two days with lots of content and not as much chocolate as you might expect!

Foreshadowing Reference Futures: Far Out or Forthcoming?- Mary Radford (Rutgers University)

After an early flight out of Greensboro, I arrived in time to check into my room and head to the ballroom for lunch and the keynote address. Mary Radford is a professor at Rutgers University and was a very engaging and energetic speaker. She began her talk by discussing all of the continuous change that we deal with, both in our jobs and at home, because of advances in technology. She shared the results of research she has done on how Millennials (born 1978-1994), and more specifically Screenagers (born 1988-1994), get their information. This research showed that Screenagers want instant access and use their phones for texting and IM rather than talking. Interestingly, they prefer to text rather than to call because there are no awkward silences with texting, and they can carry on multiple conversations at one time.

When discussing their responses to virtual reference specifically, Screenagers used the service because it was recommended to them, it was convenient and it was efficient. They didn’t use VR because they perceived that they got unhelpful answers when they did use it, and that those answers did not go beyond what they had already found via Google. They were also interested in interacting with subject specialists who could get them beyond the basics they had already located.

In terms of marketing reference, Radford suggested promoting our full range of options because our users want to know all of the ways they can contact us. To illustrate how we could promote the convenience and efficiency of using reference services, she shared a tag line from Harvard, “spend two hours doing research or 5 minutes with a Harvard librarian.”

Looking into the future, she sees continued growth in the following areas: distance education, technology innovation, the use of portable wireless services, ebook digitization, assessment, collaboration through consortial involvement and different models of staffing. She closed with, “we are change managers, don’t get in the way of change.”

READ Scale: Using Qualitative Data to Record Levels of Effort and Expertise in Answering Reference Questions- Lynn Berard (Carnegie Mellon University), Bella Karr Gerlich (Dominican University)

The traditional method of keeping statistics at public service desks is to just keep tick marks for each question or patron interaction. Obviously, a single tick mark does not reflect the variations in the time it takes to answer a question or the level of subject expertise needed. The READ Scale (Reference Effort Assessment Data) is one method that can be used to reflect these aspects of our reference interactions. Each interaction is given a rating from one to six, one being directional and six being in-depth, labor intensive research assistance. Berard and Gerlich discussed their national study that focused on the implementation of this scale in academic libraries of various sizes around the country. They started by surveying the libraries involved to make sure that they all agreed on how different types of questions would be ranked. This is an important aspect to keep in mind, because it is crucial that each participant is using the same criteria to rank their interactions as everyone else. Beyond the time involved in answering the question, other criteria used to rank interactions included the number and types of sources consulted.

Most of the libraries in the study felt that the system was easy to use and easy to incorporate into their workflow at the reference desk. The libraries used the statistics they gathered to make staffing changes (maybe a student can handle the times when there are mostly one and two level questions) and to have on-going staff training and development (staff discussed how they might have answered the question differently, veteran reference librarians showed newer librarians different resources and vice versa).

Google Gems for Reference Librarians- Russell Palmer (Lyrasis)

This was a pretty interactive session, with lots of demonstrations and examples from attendees on how they use Google everyday in their workflow and at the reference desk. I was familiar with quite a few of the resources mentioned, but it is always good to have a refresher on all of the things you can do with Google. A few I liked were:

  • Google sets: fill in two or more words in a series, and Google will give you other related terms (enter hook and line, Google adds reel, lure, float, sinker, bait). It was suggested that this would be good for students to use when they need to think of additional search terms.
  • using the “:”: examples given were: define: , stocks: , allintitle: , and filetype: . The example for filetype was to search filetype:pdf coca-cola to locate annual reports and other company information that isn’t on the website but is located in pdf files.
  • Google news archive: useful for geneology searching and has a helpful timeline feature that allows you to see when in time the majority of references to your search topic appeared.

Scaling up IM Reference: Using Library H3lp- Rebekah Kilzer (Drexel University)

Rebekah Kilzer discussed the implementation of Library H3lp in the reference department of Hagerty Library at Drexel University, starting with the evolution of their virtual reference services. In 2006, they used AIM and Yahoo with an average of 30 chats per month. In 2007 they added gmail and MSN, and in 2008, meebo. Their IM traffic jumped from 100 chats per month in Winter 2008 to 600 chats per month in Fall of 2008. Their email traffic also rose during this time, partly because their IM requests were routed to email when the chat service was unavailable. The increase in chats and emails required a change in desk staffing, and they now have two librarians at the desk each hour and one in their office monitoring the chat service.

Library H3lp is an open source program, though there is a minimal fee based upon FTE (this wasn’t discussed in detail). The program was designed specifically for libraries and features queues, customizable widgets, the ability to transfer chats to another librarian, stat tracking and call logging. Other aspects that I found interesting were: patrons can email the transcript to themselves when they are done, it can convert text to chat, any previous IM clients can be forwarded to it, and the widget can be set to forward questions to email when there isn’t anyone staffing the desk.

Kilzer stressed the importance of staff training before the new system was active. They did a lot beforehand to make sure that they kept the good aspects of the previous system for both librarians and patrons. They also did a lot of practicing, with small groups of librarians sending and answering questions amongst themselves, so that they would be comfortable with the interface and features. They found that after they implemented Library H3lp, of the over 200 questions they answered, almost all were through the Library H3lp interface, with 2 from AIM and 2 from Google Talk.

Of these sessions, I really liked the presentations on the READ Scale and Library H3lp. I think there are aspects of each that we could implement and benefit from, even if we didn’t decide to adopt the entire system.


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