Professional Development

Susan @ ALA Midwinter in Boston

Tuesday, January 12, 2016 8:10 am

ALA Midwinter

This ALA Midwinter conference was my first since I became a Director-at-Large on the LITA Board. This meant that the majority of my conference activities were meetings and the events sponsored by LITA. On the business side of things, the board holds two separate 3 hour meetings on Saturday and Monday afternoons. I used them to become more aware of the types of issues that are addressed at these and to get a feel of how my fellow board members function at the meetings. It was a pleasure to watch LITA president (and our own) Thomas Dowling lead both meetings. He kept everyone on track and on time. I understand it was one of the first times that all agenda items were addressed by the end of the two meetings. Way to go, Thomas!

At each ALA, LITA sponsors its signature event, Top Technology Trends. It is always a full house and the TTT Committee works hard to put together a diverse group of tech experts (which is no easy task). One thing I’ve learned about LITA members is that they are not shy on Twitter and as the program was in progress, people were invited to use the hashtag #alattt to make comments. What came across immediately was a voiced concern on the diversity (really the lack of diversity) of the panel. Of course, people don’t know the back story on what efforts were made to secure diversity. This time, one of the diverse panelists had a last minute emergency and couldn’t attend and 18 other females/persons of color/etc. declined to participate for various reasons. However, that didn’t stop one person from writing a long blog post about The Problems with the LITA Top Tech Panels. But what I think is great about LITA (and its new Executive Director, Jenny Levine) is that it embraces this sort of feedback and looks for ways to improve. At Monday’s Town Hall Meeting (a meeting with the best hot breakfast ever served at an ALA event), President-elect Aimee Fifarek invited participants to brainstorm about three major areas of opportunity for LITA – remote membership, information policy, and diversity and inclusion.

I ended the weekend having a new appreciation of my fellow board members and the work they have been doing and that I will now help them do!

Midwinter doesn’t give a board member much chance to attend non-division events, but I did take the opportunity to attend the President’s Program where New Jersey Senator Cory Booker spoke. He is a most inspiring speaker and you can read a summary of his main themes on the American Libraries Magazine website.

Cory @ Ala Midwinter

It was good to visit Boston in the winter when it doesn’t have snow, but there was a wide range of weather from winter rain to bitter cold/high winds. I did manage to eke out an hour or so to capture some of the sights of the city. And special thanks need to go to Chelcie who graciously let me share her room when my original plans to share fell through. It wouldn’t have been a good time of year to be homeless in Boston!

Make it Matter: NCLA’s 61st Biennial Conference

Monday, January 11, 2016 3:05 pm

Many have covered NCLA’s keynote address so I won’t repeat their observations. Instead, I’ll focus on 3 stand-out BLINC (Business Librarianship in N. Carolina) presentations that few others are likely to have attended.

BLINC sponsored 4 presentations including the one Mary Beth, Mary Krautter and I presented on entrepreneurial culture in libraries. As Chair of BLINC I was pleased to support my BLINC colleagues by attending their presentation which were about liaison responsibilities and outreach to targeted patrons.

First, Nancy Tucker and Sharon Stack from the Mauney Memorial Public Library in Kings Mountain reported on their ground-breaking program serving Kings Mountain’s business community. Sharon, the library’s director, had an idea for a completely new model for providing reference services. She partnered with Main Street, an organization whose purpose is the historic preservation and economic development of downtown commercial districts in small towns along with the city’s planning and economic development department. Together, these organizations wrote a grant that funded a business librarian’s salary for 2 years and associated programs.

The majority of the target businesses are small family-owned operations with 5 or fewer employees. The 3 partners developed a program that graduated 5 business owners in its first class. The participants learned how to create Facebook profiles and websites for their businesses, to promote themselves on social media and develop marketing plans. Nancy provided substantial support for researching the marketing plans. This is a creative approach to supporting economic development in a community and Nancy’s direct outreach to businesses is a new model for business librarians.

The next presentation was by Betty Garrison and Teresa LePors from Elon Univ. Betty is Elon’s business librarian and a member of BLINC’s Executive Committee. In this talk, Betty and Teresa shared their top recommendations for a successful liaison program:
– Be visible
– Show interest
– Experiment
– Build relationships
– Respond promptly
– Support colleagues
They gave examples of how each of these had contributed to a growing and active liaison program.

Finally, I attended Nina Exner’s talk “Engaging with Faculty Over Research”. Nina is the Assistant Head of Reference and Library Instruction at North Carolina A&T State University and a member of the BLINC Executive Committee. Her talk about supporting faculty research was a revelation as she discussed aspects of liaison work that I’d never before considered. She walked the audience through the phases of the research cycle and discussed various ways librarians could support faculty at each one. She described the phases thusly and provided ideas on service we can provide for each one:
– Discovery
– Literature search
– Funding (grant search)
– Research
– Publication

At NC A&T, librarians provide support in a variety of formats directly or in partnership with the research assistance office including:
– Stand alone workshops
– Literature review searches
– Open/public access requirements and metadata support
– Cross referrals for consultations

Nina is available and willing to talk with librarians about this work and I think she’d make an excellent speaker for a future liaison meeting.

My Visit to ZSR North

Monday, January 11, 2016 8:54 am

On January 7th, I took a break from working on my house in PA to make a field trip to Bucknell University. Bucknell is located in Lewisburg, PA, only 51 miles from from my house in Boalsburg. So why visit Bucknell? Much of the Bucknell campus was designed by Jens Frederick Larson in 1930s, who also designed the Wake Forest campus. And the Bertram Library at Bucknell was the model for ZSR.

Compare this to the original facade of ZSR:

Bertram has two lower levels, so the the number of floors is similar. Bucknell renovated their Library in the 1980s and I was curious how they addressed some issues. One of the things I liked was that there was not an elevator lobby or narrow stairs in the original building; instead they rely on the stairs in the 1980s addition and other elevators in the original wing and the addition. They have a spiral staircase to get to the mezzanines.

As part of the renovations they refinished all of the oak and used mission style furniture to give it a less dated look. They also updated the lighting:

I also liked how they modified the hallways. adding windows to many interior walls:

 

A little over two years ago, Bucknell added a Digital Scholarship Studio, something we will be adding in the near future. They have their located it in what would be our Starbucks space.

 

Finally even the areas where they have minimally renovated, they have added light and color. Here are their lower level carrels:

 

I found this to be a very productive break from packing up house and am grateful to Param Bedi and Traci Hower at Bucknell for their time and insights.

ZSR on the Cover of Archival Outlook

Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:41 am

Congrats to ZSR Special Collections and Archives for making the cover of Archival Outlook, the newsletter for the Society of American Archivists! See:

http://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook/back-issues

The image is from our Guiseppe De Santis Papers and pertains to an article by Craig Fansler on these papers and Italian neorealist film (p. 4-5, 23). Also, on page 24 you will see that Tanya Zanish-Belcher is one of two candidates running for the post of Vice-President, President-Elect of SAA! Good luck!

 

CNI Fall Membership meeting

Friday, December 18, 2015 10:44 am

Thomas Dowling and I attended the fall meeting of the Coalition for Networked Information December 14-15 in Washington, DC. Wake Forest is a member and the CIO (Mur Muchane) and I are the representatives for the University. Mur was unable to attend, so Thomas went in his place.

CNI meets twice a year and its focus is to promote the use of digital information technology to advance scholarship and education. Given campus interest (and now as of July funding to support a program) about having ZSR develop a digital scholarship space and new services, I primarily attended sessions focused on digital scholarship, Maker’s Spaces, and related programs. Here is a synopsis of the sessions I attended:

Digital Scholarship Centers: Two Models — U. of Iowa and Case Western Reserve were the presenters. Takeways: Important to brand the center broadly even if the focus is a disciplinary area. CSRU repurposed a Media Center into the Digital Scholarship Center. Saw lots of interaction between Humanities, Design, and Engineering students. Iowa, who had to build their space quickly, emphasized flexibility with creating the space as the program will change and evolve.

MakerWeb Consortium — Very relevant presentation from folks at Union College in NY, a small, undergraduate-focused school with a “liberal arts” style engineering major. Like CSWR in the early session, they had lots of collaboration between engineering and liberal arts students. Many engineering students work as lab assistants. Big focus of their program is 3D scanning and printing.

Cooperative Path for Open Access: Talked about the sustainability of the current “pay for open access” model that many publishers have. Encouraged libraries, presses, and faculty to take a more active role in the dissemination of scholarship (i.e., direct those funds to peer-reviewed OA journals, etc.)

Design Labs: Learning & Scholarship: Liked how Michigan is trying to 3D print block prints for its letterpress.

Digital Scholarship Spaces: People are the key to a successful program — the technology and space will not be successful without the people to consult, train, and train.

CNI does a detailed program with abstracts. For more information, see:https://www.cni.org/events/membership-meetings/past-meetings/fall-2015/project-briefings-breakout-sessions

While attendance at CNI is limited to member representatives or their designate, you can also attend by being a speaker. The spring meeting will April 4-5 in San Antonio and a call for proposals should go out soon. Also of relevance for us is that CNI and ARL will offering a digital scholarship workshop in the spring (announcement coming in January).

This was my first CNI and based on the content and networking opportunities, I am glad we are a member.

 

 

 

Caring for Rare Books

Monday, December 7, 2015 12:39 pm

On Wednesday, December 2, I traveled to the High Point Museum for a webinar given by the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC). The webinar, Caring for Rare Books, was given by Todd Pattison, a book conservator at NEDCC, and covered the general care of rare books.

Todd began by defining a rare book. A book is rare because of a number of factors, including age, importance, scarcity or subject matter. Todd covered briefly the primary materials encountered with rare books: paper, leather, parchment and cloth. The internal factors of these materials are sometimes difficult to correct, as some of these may have an inherent vice, such as acidic paper. He further mentioned that preservation is an essential function of every library or archive and should be part of it’s strategic plan. Todd discussed each of these materials and their inherent vices. Paper is made of cellulose and over time acids break down the cellulose chains resulting in a loss of strength. Leather, which is tanned animal skin, is naturally acidic and becomes less strong over time. The conditions each of these materials is stored in can also cause deterioration (such as high temperatures). Parchment, a general term also including vellum, is limed and scraped animal skin which is dried under tension. Parchment is very sensitive to humidity. Parchment is not as flexible as paper, but is more durable. Cloth is susceptible to light, dust, pests and mold.

Todd discussed the environment and said that maintaining a stable temperature (60-70 degrees) and humidity level (30-50%) is critical. He also discussed light, air pollutants, pests and mold. Todd advised handling rare books with clean hands (without gloves). One should remove any sharp objects such as jewelry, name badges or watches so as not to damage the materials. When turning pages, one hand should support each page from behind. Todd also discussed the superiority of powder-coated steel shelves over wood shelves and the general use of archival materials for enclosures and liners.

Following the webinar, we heard a presentation from Isabella Balthar who is a member of Preservation Services at UNCG. Isabella discussed a project in which she received a grant to develop posters and videos on basic preservation principles and best practices from UNCG. The project, called No Boundaries in Preservation, attempts to convey best preservation practices in English, Spanish and Portuguese through posters and videos.

The final portion of the day was a wet books salvage demonstration by Marianne Kelsey who is a conservator at Etherington Conservation Services. Marianne discussed three options for salvaging wet books: air-drying, interleaving and freezing.

It was a good day to learn some new things and see colleagues from other institutions. Some of us are also members of Triad-ACREN – the Triad Area Disaster Response Team. Several Triad-ACREN team members were present at this workshop.

Lightsabers, soap operas, and Ol’ Blue Eyes; Or, Molly at the Charleston Conference

Thursday, December 3, 2015 2:19 pm

Although last month was my third time attending the Charleston Conference, this was my first time attending the conference from start to finish: last year, Chelcie and I attended the two-day preconference seminar, then dropped by the Vendor Showcase before heading home; and in 2008, I attended for a single day to co-present a Lively Lunch on library support for the then-new NIH Public Access Policy. So it was a treat to be able to experience the Charleston Conference in full–and what a full conference it was!

In recent years, Charleston has offered more sessions tailored to scholarly communication interests, from copyright to open access to changes in publishing. I attended sessions on how and why faculty share articles (key takeaway: they share because it’s natural behavior, it’s easy to do, and they aren’t too worried about violating copyright or licensing agreements), on Creative Commons licenses and open access (there’s some unease around CC-BY because it allows commercial reuse), on open access publishing (innovative approaches I’m excited about, especially those from UC Press and Ubiquity Press), and on open access workflows (must acknowledge that the research life cycle is separate from the publication life cycle, but faculty are in both simultaneously).

The plenary sessions I attended were interesting, with Jim O’Donnell’s Star Wars-themed plenary giving me much to think about regarding the future of academic libraries. And the privacy plenary the next day provided one of my favorite moments: a lawyer’s a cappella performance of his derivative version of a Frank Sinatra song about Google and online privacy!

One panel made me feel good about our mentoring practices at ZSR, as everyone on “The Young and the Restless” panel acknowledged that having a mentor is critical to professional growth, but that finding a mentor is not always easy. While I know our mentoring program is internally focused, emphasizing the importance of mentoring reminds all of us of its value. Whether we officially mentor someone at ZSR, or in our various areas of librarianship, or unofficially mentor someone, I believe that the spirit of mentoring is infusing our library faculty beneficially.

Finally, as with all conferences, networking with librarians and vendors was of prime importance. I strengthened several key connections with other scholcomm librarians, and had fruitful conversations with several vendors and publishing reps.

All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed my time at the Charleston Conference, and anticipate that it will now be one of my annual go-to conferences.

Access Services Conference 2015

Tuesday, November 24, 2015 4:34 pm

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to attend the Access Service Conference in Atlanta, GA with Mary Beth Lock. As she pointed out in her post, there were many relevant sessions available. I mostly attended those relating to Course Reserves. The keynote speaker, Peter Bromberg, was an engaging speaker with a positive attitude. My favorite quote of the Conference: “It’s not failure, it’s data!”

It’s always interesting to see how other libraries handle the same challenges we have here at ZSR. There was a follow-up session from last year about UTSC‘s self-service model for Course Reserves. They had just implemented the service last year and came back to report on lessons learned. By providing self-service they estimated a 54% increase in circulation of Course Reserves material. They also reported a 90% drop in Circulation Desk traffic which resulted in having to repurpose that staff. Fines were charged for overdue items at $.50/hour and it sounded like they strictly enforced them. Only 4 items out of 1300 have gone missing since they adopted this model even though they allow Course Reserves books to taken out of the library. While this model is not practical for ZSR ($31K (CAD)), it does demonstrate that some security concerns could be reevaluated.

Peter Bae from Princeton University Library began his presentation by showing us one slide that he said summed up the entire presentation: “Consider more Ebooks for Ereserves and do your math. It may save you time and money”. While he was basically correct, we all stuck around to learn more. Factors used to evaluate an available Ebook included: instructor preference, multi- or single-use access model, price, quality of printing options, the print format (pdf, html, etc.), and whether additional software was need to view the books. We currently use Ebooks for Course Reserves whenever possible but there may be opportunities to be more proactive in finding an Ebook that meets the instructor’s needs.

Textbook cost was addressed as it has been in other conferences lately. Sewanee‘s Library made a decision to purchase every class text and place them on Course Reserves. They felt these books would be more likely to be used than many of the other books that were being purchased by the library. With the assistance of the bookstore they identified and purchased over 600 books ($24,500) which resulted in a 2,284% increase in circulation statistics. They also charge fines for overdue Course Reserves materials ($.75/hour) and reported that they were taking in quite a bit of money. They did not include course packs on Reserves, instead, offering supplemental course materials through SIPX.

Other presentations on circulating technology items (cameras, iPads, GPS, and microphones) and marketing library services had similarities to what we’re doing here at ZSR.

Our self-guided tour of the Georgia Tech library was a fun adventure (included a trolley ride) and the weather, the facilities and the fellowship were great.

Three Conferences = Busy Autumn

Monday, November 23, 2015 5:47 pm

I attended three different conferences this fall, Designing Libraries IV: Designing 21st Century Libraries at North Carolina State University, NCLA in Greensboro and the Access Services Conference in Atlanta, GA. In order to be most succinct, I’m combining posts for all three, though the subject matter ranged quite extensively.

The Designing Libraries conference was chock full of libraries telling the stories of what they did to be prepared for the academic library’s reinvention as place. The presentations are all available online. Story after story of how each library made significant changes to their space that had historically held books. Library leaders, planners and their architects conducted panel discussions from “Creating the Vision,” to “Designing Great Library Environments for Staff,” and “The Role of Makerspaces in Academic Libraries.” Thematically, all of the various speakers identified the importance of making spaces that are flexible, making space for the study and collaboration needs of today’s student, and the need to hire experts to ensure that you will do it right. Renovation is not for the faint of heart.

At NCLA, I presented in two different sessions. The first one on “Developing and Entrepreneurial Library Culture” along with Mary Scanlon and Mary Krautter (of UNCG) was delivered to a very full room. The presentation was one we pared down from the fuller workshop we’d delivered in Abu Dhabi last spring. The audience participated in a lively discussion after the presentation was done. The second session I participated in was one entitled “A Library for the Whole Student: Creating a Multidimensional Culture of Health & Wellness at your Library” along with Meghan Webb, Susan Smith and Hu Womack. We discussed the 9 dimensions of wellness described by our Thrive office, and how the library has partnered in creating initiatives to help. Interestingly, one of the questions asked was about how our “Cans for Fines” program works wherein students can bring in canned goods to eliminate overdue fines from their record. I am continually surprised how things that are so embedded in our culture here are ground breaking ideas elsewhere.

It is rare when one goes to a conference wherein every session is relevant, but that is actually true with The Access Services Conference, held in Atlanta, GA from November 11-13. The featured keynote speaker was Peter Bromberg, a very dynamic speaker with a terrific message about how difficult it is for us to continue to adapt to the pace of change when change is increasing exponentially. He used this great and very funny video to illustrate his point entitled “Everything’s Amazing and Nobody’s Happy.” Do yourself a favor and take a few minutes to watch it. Other sessions I attended were focused on staff training to maximize customer service, creating a reserve textbook collection, and on using student feedback to redefine library spaces. Much of what was related were ideas we’ve already implemented, so that at least reassured me that we are on the right path. Ellen Makaravage and I took a field trip to tour the Georgia Tech Info Commons. That space was actually highlighted as one of the examples in the first conference and takes me full circle back to that designing 21st century libraries idea.

LOEX Fall Focus Conference 2015

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 9:17 am

On Friday, November 13 I traveled to Ypsilanti, Michigan to attend the inaugural LOEX Fall Focus Conference. This two day conference focused exclusively on the new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. There were about 120 instruction librarians in attendance from across the nation.

A Brief History of the Framework

For those of you who keep up with what has been happening in the ACRL world of instruction librarianship, you know that our world has been rocked by the February 2015 filing of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. In 2011, it was decided by an ACRL Review Task Force, that significant revisions were needed to the fifteen year old Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. In March 2013, the Revision Task Force began their work and in January 2014 the first draft of the Framework was introduced. Reactions to the Framework were mixed and many discussions (often heated) ensued. The controversy swirled around the nature of the Framework. While the Standards focused on information literacy as skills-based, the Framework introduced information literacy as a social practice. Originally, the Framework was supposed to replace the Standards, but in February 2015, the ACRL Board of Directors decided to “file” (as opposed to “adopt”) the Framework. And so this past weekend, 120 instruction librarians from across the country gathered together to try and figure out what all of this means for the instructional programs at our institutions.

LOEX day one – Friday

I will begin by saying that I wish they had kicked off this conference with a plenary session such as the one we had Saturday morning. While many key concepts were introduced throughout the conference, it would have been great to have someone provide a more structured context for the new Framework with more discussion about the learning theory behind the Framework. While I believe I finally have a grasp on “Threshold Concepts” as being transformative, troublesome, and irreversible, there are other learning theory ideas that I’m still trying to digest. For example, there was mention throughout the two days that information literacy can only be understood within the context of a discipline or social context. Also, it was evident that some of the concepts truly resonated with the librarians (so many references to “Scholarship is a Conversation”!), but some of the concepts were rarely mentioned such as “Research as Inquiry.”

SESSION one – “Translating the Framework into Your Current Practice” by Jo Angela Oehrli and Diana Perpich (U of Michigan)

This session incorporated a jigsaw exercise which the presenters use to train the 100 people who do library instruction at the University of Michigan. They took three of the concepts and distributed them on colored cards throughout the room so that each person held one frame: Authority is Constructed and Contextual; Scholarship as Conversation; and Searching as Strategic Exploration. You first found 2 other people who had your same concept (mine was “Scholarship is a Conversation”) and I must say that it was very interesting to hear what others are doing with that frame! When I teach, I just mention the concept in class (which is a valid approach I later learned!), but some instructors have students examine articles that build upon previous articles/research. The first group was our “expert” group. We then formed our “jigsaw” group and found people with the same color card but with different concepts. We then shared what we learned and that was also interesting! For the “Authority is Contextual,” one librarian was into rock bands and she talked about how a band becomes an “authority” for that type of music. That is not an analogy I could use, but I bet Steve Kelley could nail that!

SESSION Two – Information Literacy by Design by Jonathan McMichael and Liz McGlynn (UNC-CH)

Some of the sessions I attended just tbecause of who was presenting (in this case Jonathan). This presentation was based on Liz McGlynn’s SILS Master’s Paper. In this presentation, they talked about how they trained graduate students and paraprofessionals to use Understanding by Design (which they changed to Information Literacy by Design) to shape their library instruction sessions for their freshmen English 105 classes. They credited the Framework with freeing up the canned sessions they previously presented, to empowering their instructors to tailor the sessions by keeping the learning outcomes for the session the main purpose of the session. They use “Big Ideas” to transform student experiences (very much in line with “Threshold Concepts”) and they teach using “chunking” rather than “coverage.” On a side note, every time I hear Jonathan speak I feel like I’m not working hard enough! The undergraduate library at UNC has two instruction librarians and they are reaching over 300 sections of this writing class by using graduate students and paraprofessionals as instructors, and that is just one piece of what he accomplishes each semester!

SESSION Three – Framing New Frames by Lisa Hinchliffe (U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) and Laura Saunders (Simmons College)

This was probably the most highly anticipated breakout sessions of the conference. Lisa is the lead instructor for “Immersion,” a past ACRL President, and an active contributor to listserves and social media about information literacy issues. Her skepticism of the Framework has been well documented. Laura Saunders is an Assistant Professor at the Simmons School of Library and Information Science.

They began their discussion by talking about the pros and cons of the Framework. They saw its potential in how it is conceptually based, how it inspires pedagogy, how the metaphors invite exploration, and how the new-ness is energizing. They saw the pitfalls as: treat frames as standards (I will reiterate this later, but this was mentioned several times—frames were never meant to be measured or treated like standards); thresholds become ends; functions to limit and not expand; unclear state of concepts rejected. Lisa and Laura both pitched the idea that we need to go with the idea of just “concepts” and give up the theoretical “threshold concepts.” They also believe that the Framework should allow for new concepts to be added. Laura’s new Concept was “Information Social Justice” and Lisa’s Concept was “Information Apprenticeship in Community.” You can read their Knowledge Practices and Dispositions here.

LOEX day two – Saturday

PLENARY – Merinda Kaye Hensley (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

By far, the highlight of the conference was the plenary session on Saturday morning. Merinda Kaye Hensley served on the Framework committee and I learned so many things from her presentation! She presented findings from a study from a survey (in which I participated!) about how the Framework was being used in the Fall of 2015. While that information was interesting, it was the nuggets of additional information that were fascinating! She was a superb presenter and she reminded the group that the Framework was a committee effort and she did not agree with all of the document. She talked about the new definition of information literacy. The old definition could easily be summed up by saying: “an information literate person is one who can find, evaluate, and use information.” Here is the new definition: “Information literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.” Merinda pointed out that there is nothing in the new definition about evaluating which she sees as an essential element to information literacy.

Here are some findings from the survey: 1) most believe that threshold concepts help to elevate librarians from practitioners to instructors; 2) one of the complaints of the Framework is that the learning theory jargon contributes to confusion; 3) people are divided over whether or not information literacy is a discipline (most do not think it is).

She said that FRAMES CANNOT BE TESTED and she specifically mentioned the TATIL test that is being developed to test the Framework! This was reiterated in other sessions by other presenters, but she clearly stated that TATIL was missing the intent of the Framework. This was significant for a couple of reasons: one was that TATIL was presented a breakout the day before, and also we (ZSR) agreed to help test the BETA version of this with at least 25 of our students. Learning Outcomes should be tested, not the Frames.

Another very important criticism of the Framework is that there are no Learning Outcomes included. Each institution is encouraged to come up with their own Learning Outcomes to meet the particular needs of their institution. She stated that the knowledge practices and dispositions should be based on Learning Outcomes and not the Frames. This one idea was worth the entire conference for me! No wonder we are all grasping to understand this document. She also believes that the Standards and the Framework can exist together and that many people are pulling Learning Outcomes from the Standards to be used in the Framework.

The last nugget of gold that she tossed out, was that “No one is expected to teach all the frames.” She went on to say that sometimes just mentioning a concept at the beginning or end of a class is enough. By the way, I did not realize the Frames are listed in alphabetical order! The committee could never agree on an order based on priority.

Session 5 – “A Framework Rubric” by Emily Z. Brown and Susan Souza Mort (Bristol Community College)

Emily and Susan used the LEAP VALUE Information Literacy Rubric to assess the information literacy skills of the students at their community college. When the Framework was introduced, they changed the rubric to reflect the new concepts. This was the only session I attended that gave out their Powerpoint as a handout and they also gave everyone a copy of their rubric. They were primarily doing citation analysis, but Amanda, Kyle and I will be able to use many of their ideas on a LIB100 final project rubric we are in the process of developing.

I attended a few other sessions, but those are the highlights. Overall, it was a fantastic conference! Friday night, I enjoyed eating at a local restaurant with 11 other librarians from the conference (a “dine around”). It was fascinating to talk about all kinds of things. I did not know that at Emory, their I.T. department and Library are combined, and the head of I.T. reports to the University Librarian! Now that is an interesting model!

I am very thankful for the opportunity to attend this conference and I look forward to attending LOEX in the May in Pittsburg!

 


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