Professional Development

In the 'Conferences' Category...

Chelcie at ALA Midwinter 2016

Monday, January 18, 2016 9:44 pm

For me the central happening of ALA Midwinter 2016 was kicking off my participation in ALA’s Emerging Leaders program. As part of this program, I’ll glimpse the sizable architecture of ALA, network with awesome people, and work together with members of a small team to solve a problem framed by one of ALA’s divisions or round tables.

Chelcie's 2016 Emerging Leaders team

Obligatory Emerging Leaders team selfie! From left to right: Melissa Stoner, Project Specialist for UNLV’s participation in the National Digital Newspaper Program; me; Harriet Wintermute, Metadata Librarian at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln; Craig Boman, responsible for the care and feeding of the ILS at the University of Dayton.

My team is AWESOME. We are tasked with developing an archiving policy for the Maps & Geospatial Information Round Table to deposit their materials with ALA’s Institutional Repository. (Sidebar — did you know that ALA has an institutional repository? We didn’t either!) We’ll figure out things such as roles & responsibilities (whose job it is to deposit materials), selection criteria, descriptive practices, documentation, and instructional materials for the deposit process. It’s an achievable and interesting project, and I look forward to working with my team members between now and ALA Annual in Orlando.

This Midwinter Meeting also offered strong programming on digital scholarship topics, notably the meetings of ACRL’s Digital Scholarship Centers Interest Group and Digital Humanities Interest Group. The meeting of the Digital Scholarship Centers Interest Group (newly formed under the leadership of Merinda Kaye Hensley and Steven Bell) centered around the research done by Alix Keener, Digital Scholarship Librarian at the University of Michigan, on collaborative research relationships between librarians and (digital) humanists. You can learn more about her findings in her article in Digital Humanities Quarterly, The Arrival Fallacy: Collaborative Research Relationships in the Digital Humanities. Even if digital scholarship isn’t your bag, I highly recommend Alix’s article because it speaks to many tensions and opportunities librarians and scholars are embracing as the collaborative structures of the research process are re-negotiated. It’s an especially good companion read to Digital Humanities in the Library: Challenges and Opportunities for Subject Specialists, now an open access monograph.

The meeting of the Digital Humanities Interest Group brought together a panel to discuss their experiences building DH communities of practice within their institutions (Amherst, Northeastern, and Boston University) and their region (the greater Boston area). I find the Five Colleges Digital Humanities model particularly intriguing for us here at Wake Forest because of its focus on undergraduate learning & research. Among other initiatives, they offer digital humanities micro-grants to undergraduate students and hire undergraduate fellows and post-bacs in digital humanities.

Some excellent programs, plus opportunities to catch up with some favorite colleagues and friends and compare notes about our work — my 2016 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston was everything you could ask of a conference.

Roz @ ALA Midwinter 2016

Tuesday, January 12, 2016 10:02 am

The very first ALA Midwinter conference I ever attended was in Boston in 2005 when I was just looking for opportunities to become more involved in the association more deeply. Fast forward 11 years and I am now chair of an ACRL section and a nominee for ALA Council. What a difference a decade makes.

Before my conference began I was able to play a bit of the tourist (my favorite role in any city) and went with Mary Beth to the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum. My main interest was to see if my husband Patrick had indeed made it into their museum video – a film project he worked on over a year ago. And not only was he in the video he’s in the brochure!! So that was fun and actually educational. The museum has one of the only two tea boxes that were thrown overboard that have survived to the modern day.

On Friday afternoon my conference began with a meeting of the ACRL Leadership Council. ACRL is revising it’s Plan for Excellence that is approaching 5 years old. The major change that may be coming is the addition of a fourth goal area that may be concerned with the changing profile of staff that work in academic libraries. The association is interested in being useful to those with an MLS and the many people who work in academic libraries that do not have the MLS. I am sure more discussion will be happening on this before the ALA Annual meeting.

On Saturday I met with my section, the Law and Political Science section for our executive and general membership meetings. Lots of section-y stuff was discussed but the biggest news is that we are going to propose a name change for the section to better reflect our membership. We simply don’t have many if any law librarians in the section any more but have many public policy and international relations librarians. The final new name will be chosen this spring and will be sent to ACRL at the annual meeting for approval.

The rest of my conference was divided between the vendor floor and a few sessions. On the vendor front some great new things are coming. Alexander Street Press has a new Food Studies Online product that looks fascinating and relevant to many faculty on campus. I got a demo of LibCal from our friends at Springshare as we are looking for a more manageable way to schedule personal research sessions. The product was impressive and could solve that problem while also providing us alternatives for other scheduling things such as study room reservations, etc. I will schedule a demo for ZSR this spring. Perhaps the most interesting new product announcement came from the American Psychological Association and will be called APA Style Central. It will be a product that institutions can subscribe to that will give a range of tutorials, quizzes, and learning objects centered around APA Style. In addition it will allow students and faculty to store their source citations in the product and do collaborative writing utilizing the full APA style requirements. Will be fascinating to see in action and I am really curious about the pricing.

Among the sessions I found Cory Booker’s talk particularly energizing. LITA’s Top Tech Trends introduced me to the scheduling bot called Amy that now has me fascinated. The services to international students discussion group showed me that all libraries are trying to figure out where they can be of use to these students. Some schools have progressed further than others so there were some great ideas circulating the room. The ACRL update on the Value of Academic Libraries session was not what I expected but was a report from three libraries about programs they have in place targeting diversity. Of their examples a couple stood out – one was a project where the librarians worked to help in workshops that provided faculty with the tools they need to make their syllabi ‘transparent’ and to reduce the use of jargon and coded language that often frustrates first generation and international students who ‘don’t speak college.’ Another was a library that provided a whole range of workshops for their student workers on things from financial literacy, time management and career goals (not always taught by librarians, but facilitated by them) in an effort to help them develop as students and emerging professionals.

All in all it was a great conference and provided much food for thought!

Access Services Conference 2015

Tuesday, November 24, 2015 4:34 pm

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to attend the Access Service Conference in Atlanta, GA with Mary Beth Lock. As she pointed out in her post, there were many relevant sessions available. I mostly attended those relating to Course Reserves. The keynote speaker, Peter Bromberg, was an engaging speaker with a positive attitude. My favorite quote of the Conference: “It’s not failure, it’s data!”

It’s always interesting to see how other libraries handle the same challenges we have here at ZSR. There was a follow-up session from last year about UTSC‘s self-service model for Course Reserves. They had just implemented the service last year and came back to report on lessons learned. By providing self-service they estimated a 54% increase in circulation of Course Reserves material. They also reported a 90% drop in Circulation Desk traffic which resulted in having to repurpose that staff. Fines were charged for overdue items at $.50/hour and it sounded like they strictly enforced them. Only 4 items out of 1300 have gone missing since they adopted this model even though they allow Course Reserves books to taken out of the library. While this model is not practical for ZSR ($31K (CAD)), it does demonstrate that some security concerns could be reevaluated.

Peter Bae from Princeton University Library began his presentation by showing us one slide that he said summed up the entire presentation: “Consider more Ebooks for Ereserves and do your math. It may save you time and money”. While he was basically correct, we all stuck around to learn more. Factors used to evaluate an available Ebook included: instructor preference, multi- or single-use access model, price, quality of printing options, the print format (pdf, html, etc.), and whether additional software was need to view the books. We currently use Ebooks for Course Reserves whenever possible but there may be opportunities to be more proactive in finding an Ebook that meets the instructor’s needs.

Textbook cost was addressed as it has been in other conferences lately. Sewanee‘s Library made a decision to purchase every class text and place them on Course Reserves. They felt these books would be more likely to be used than many of the other books that were being purchased by the library. With the assistance of the bookstore they identified and purchased over 600 books ($24,500) which resulted in a 2,284% increase in circulation statistics. They also charge fines for overdue Course Reserves materials ($.75/hour) and reported that they were taking in quite a bit of money. They did not include course packs on Reserves, instead, offering supplemental course materials through SIPX.

Other presentations on circulating technology items (cameras, iPads, GPS, and microphones) and marketing library services had similarities to what we’re doing here at ZSR.

Our self-guided tour of the Georgia Tech library was a fun adventure (included a trolley ride) and the weather, the facilities and the fellowship were great.

Three Conferences = Busy Autumn

Monday, November 23, 2015 5:47 pm

I attended three different conferences this fall, Designing Libraries IV: Designing 21st Century Libraries at North Carolina State University, NCLA in Greensboro and the Access Services Conference in Atlanta, GA. In order to be most succinct, I’m combining posts for all three, though the subject matter ranged quite extensively.

The Designing Libraries conference was chock full of libraries telling the stories of what they did to be prepared for the academic library’s reinvention as place. The presentations are all available online. Story after story of how each library made significant changes to their space that had historically held books. Library leaders, planners and their architects conducted panel discussions from “Creating the Vision,” to “Designing Great Library Environments for Staff,” and “The Role of Makerspaces in Academic Libraries.” Thematically, all of the various speakers identified the importance of making spaces that are flexible, making space for the study and collaboration needs of today’s student, and the need to hire experts to ensure that you will do it right. Renovation is not for the faint of heart.

At NCLA, I presented in two different sessions. The first one on “Developing and Entrepreneurial Library Culture” along with Mary Scanlon and Mary Krautter (of UNCG) was delivered to a very full room. The presentation was one we pared down from the fuller workshop we’d delivered in Abu Dhabi last spring. The audience participated in a lively discussion after the presentation was done. The second session I participated in was one entitled “A Library for the Whole Student: Creating a Multidimensional Culture of Health & Wellness at your Library” along with Meghan Webb, Susan Smith and Hu Womack. We discussed the 9 dimensions of wellness described by our Thrive office, and how the library has partnered in creating initiatives to help. Interestingly, one of the questions asked was about how our “Cans for Fines” program works wherein students can bring in canned goods to eliminate overdue fines from their record. I am continually surprised how things that are so embedded in our culture here are ground breaking ideas elsewhere.

It is rare when one goes to a conference wherein every session is relevant, but that is actually true with The Access Services Conference, held in Atlanta, GA from November 11-13. The featured keynote speaker was Peter Bromberg, a very dynamic speaker with a terrific message about how difficult it is for us to continue to adapt to the pace of change when change is increasing exponentially. He used this great and very funny video to illustrate his point entitled “Everything’s Amazing and Nobody’s Happy.” Do yourself a favor and take a few minutes to watch it. Other sessions I attended were focused on staff training to maximize customer service, creating a reserve textbook collection, and on using student feedback to redefine library spaces. Much of what was related were ideas we’ve already implemented, so that at least reassured me that we are on the right path. Ellen Makaravage and I took a field trip to tour the Georgia Tech Info Commons. That space was actually highlighted as one of the examples in the first conference and takes me full circle back to that designing 21st century libraries idea.

Hu at NCLA: “A Librarian, an Archivist, and a Professor walk into…Collaboration that Matters”

Tuesday, November 10, 2015 11:38 am

Since others have already posted about NCLA, I thought I would use my post to talk about an exciting program I attended by Shanta Alvarez and Patrick Rudd from Elon University. This program focused on the use of primary sources in classes, most notably, the Cable School, a restored 1850s schoolhouse that was part of the first public school system in North Carolina, known as the Common Schools.

Courtesy of Elon School of Education: http://www.elon.edu/e-web/academics/education/outreach/default.xhtml

Along with using the Cable School to teach about education, for Elon’s 125th anniversary, students in a first year English class wrote stories about buildings on campus. Additionally, photos of mills and mill villages from the LEARN NC collection were used by students as primary sources in field work in the school system.

As a result of attending this session, I would like to try the research and writing assignment around campus buildings with LIB100 students at WFU as a way of introducing both primary sources and Special Collections to them!

NC CUPA-HR

Monday, November 9, 2015 4:45 pm

The North Carolina College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR) met October 7 – 9 in Cherokee with about a 150 in attendance. It was a pleasure joining our campus HR colleagues, Christy Lennon, Chris Dinkins, Pearlie Patton and Kari Reese for the event. The opening keynoter, Jeffrey Mangum, a Chicago playwright and founder of the Theater-based Learning & Development, shared insight based upon a body of research conducted by Joseph Campbell. According to Campbell, research tells us that there are a set of specific needs that must be met on the leadership journey in order for one to become a “hero.” We learn more through our eyes than we ever will with our ears. We need to take seriously our obligation as leader in supporting those that report to us. Make sure each one feels safe enough around you to give their truest opinion. Each journey begins with a slight imbalance. There is always room to improve our retention, our ability to engage, productivity efforts, and improvement of team effectiveness.

There are six steps on the journey towards succeeding, (1) the call to adventure – most people will say no first, these are the ones you want; (2) supernatural aid – tempering your hero for the trials that come; (3) crossing the first threshold – this is what makes your place unique; (4) the trials – any obstacle that stands between the hero and the prize; (5) the prize – the more clarity you give it the more likely they are to achieve it; (6) the return – this is what the hero gets.

Beth Tyner Jones, from the Womble Carlyle Law Firm gave the HR update. It was during this session that I was reminded of some pending legislature surrounding positions classified as exempt. There are proposed salary changes that could take the current minimum from $23,660 a year to $50,440. Campuses should start now by conducting audits of all exempt positions. Do they meet the established criteria? Some employers may have classified a position as exempt in an effort to reduce overtime pay. Beth also discussed the ACA compliance. It was here that we learned that resident advisers are not counted as FLSA employees.

With laptops, email and the need to be online at all times, Beth asked the audience if we had considered when compensable time starts. Here are a couple of considerations to think about. Do you send your employee an email the night before with the expectation that they read it before they get to work? Does your employee travel to a conference, if so, are they gone more than the 7.5 hour work day?

During the session on the Intersection of Title IX and Human Resources, I was pleased to see that WFU has already complied with the necessary steps as outlined by the presenter. Among those recommendations was the establishment of a dedicated Title IX coordinator, engaging in ongoing efforts to educate students, faculty and staff about sex discrimination and what it means, conducting an assessment of the campus climate and establishing/communicating the grievance procedure.

Chris Dinkins joined a panel of presenters discussing the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC) for which WFU is a contributing partner. Wake joins ECU, NCCU, Davison and Pitt Community College in this effort. HERC offers the largest database of higher education and related jobs in the world. All jobs are cross posted on the leading job board aggregators. The recruitment and retention of exceptional and diverse faculty and staff are critical to NC Colleges and Universities. Collaborating on strategies and methods to help in the area would be a huge win for North Carolina. Wake actually hosted on November 9 an informational meeting in an effort to recruit other interested NC schools.

OCLC Member Forum 2015

Monday, October 26, 2015 2:58 pm

On October 13, Jeff Eller, Leslie McCall and I attended the OCLC 2015 Member Forum at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte.

Our first session was about resources and developments at OCLC presented by Meryl Cinnamon, OCLC Member Relations Liaison. Of particular interest was the development of an ILL cost calculator. Other links of interest included:

In addition to learning about OCLC products and developments, we had the opportunity to break into groups based on our roles in libraries and later on, our library “type” (academic v. public or special). I chose to attend the “FirstSearch and Discovery” session to see if I could learn how to better navigate the new WorldCat interface called WorldCat Discovery (formerly FirstSearch) to which ZSR recently migrated. As it turned out, many of the represented libraries now use WorldShare Management Services (WMS) which is OCLC’s Integrated Library System (ILS). I learned that the WMS interface does permit access to the MARC records for the OCLC record but the Discovery interface does not. I voiced my concern over the need for this additional information to facilitate research by some of our faculty members who have effectively used FirstSearch for many years. These sessions were productive in that many of the library representatives were frank in their feedback regarding OCLC services and were able to have their concerns heard by a high-level representative.

The last session of the day was led by Drew Borda, Vice President, Management and Customer Operations who spoke about the “purposeful” culture shift at OCLC with a focus on responsiveness and accountability.

Rebecca @ SAA 2015

Friday, September 4, 2015 4:58 pm

Recently, I traveled to Cleveland for the Society of American Archivists (SAA) 2015 Annual Meeting. I found this to be a particularly engaging experience, as I am becoming more and more involved in SAA and the various interest groups. You may see two themes emerge in the blog post: web-archiving and Reference, Access, and Outreach.

My first day in Cleveland, I represented WFU and ZSR at the Archive-It Partner Meeting. You may know that Special Collections & Archives (SC&A) has been using Archive-It as a web archiving platform since 2008. I have been involved with the Wake Forest University Archives Archive-It collection and its managment since 2010 (along with Kevin Gilberston, Craig Fansler, and Stephanie Bennett). Although I wasn’t able to attend the entire meeting, I did mange to sit in on a breakout group about quality assurance that was eye opening and encouraging. Basically, the group exchanged best practices and swapped stories about the difficulty of web archiving. I got some good tips and made contacts that I hope will help our team fine tune our collection.

Day two was filled with the Reference, Access, and Outreach Section’s “Teaching With Primary Resources” unconference. This was a wonderful addition to the regular SAA schedule and it has really made me think about how to “flip” the student experience in Special Collections & Archives. One example is to encourage students to use all their senses (except for taste) to describe materials they are experiencing in Special Collections. This will (hopefully) help people get past the idea that “everything is online” and have them engage with the feel of vellum, the smell of microfilm, and the look of manuscripts. I am hoping to use some of the strategies I learned in the numerous LIB100 classes scheduled in SC&A this Fall.

Day three and I started things off participating on a panel called “Big Web, Small Staff: Web Archiving with Limited Resources.” This was a terrific opportunity to engage with other archivists who are working with web archives on a smaller scale than the usual presenters on this topic. Our panel attempted (and I think succeeded) in breaking down how to implement and manage a web archive with limited resources. What made this different from other panels was that no one presenting was from a large institution with ample staff committed to the project. Everyone on the panel was working with limited staff and funding. The panel simply explained our own best practices and encouraged the majority of the attendees who have not yet, but would like to, set up a web archiving program at their institution.

Some other sessions I attended and found very valuable were “Learning to Manage, Managing to Learn” (one of the panel members was our old friend Audra Eagle Yun!) and “Narrowing the Focus of Social Media” (featuring another former North Carolina colleague, Katie Nash). Although very different panels, I found both applicable to my work.

I have recently been elected to the Reference, Access, and Outreach (RAO) section’s Steering Committee, so spent a bit of time in Cleveland attending the SAA Leadership Orientation and Forum as well as the RAO section meeting. I believe this is a great opportunity to get involved on a national level and have enjoyed working with RAO in the past. They have an active and engaging membership with some fantastic ideas shared at the meeting every year. I am thrilled to be able to work behind the scenes to make this even better.

Every year I find the SAA meeting to be more and more rewarding as I become more active in the profession and this year was no exception. As the current President of the Society of North Carolina Archivists (SNCA) I met up with and talked to many NC colleagues about what they are doing at their institutions. As my involvement grows beyond NC, I look forward to learning more at further SAA conferences. Thank you to the Dean’s office for funding this trip. I am happy to continue the conversation with anyone who would like to hear more about my experience at SAA.

Roz at SAGE/CQ Press Advisory Board

Friday, July 17, 2015 2:01 pm

As some of you may know, I serve on the Reference Library Advisory Board for SAGE/CQ Press. This board meets virtually two or three times a year and for dinner at ALA Midwinter and Annual to provide feedback to SAGE and CQ Press about ideas in development for new products, interface upgrades and even to provide the library perspective on issues in the publishing world. SAGE has a variety of boards (Reference, Collection Development, Aquisitions, etc.), all run by our old ZSR friend Elisabeth Leonard who is now Director for Market Research for SAGE/CQ Press. Each year she brings members from across the various library boards to their headquarters in Thousand Oaks, CA for a meeting/brainstorming session. This was my second time to be invited and just like last year, I feel I may have gotten as much from the discussion as SAGE did (and the spectacularly beautiful SoCal weather did not stink).

This year there were five of us from the various boards in attendance and one other joined virtually during the Monday meeting. Two were collection management folks, one was head of a consortium, another soon to be head of resource services at an ARL and myself – the lone public services person. This time our conversations ranged from the state of ebook thinking in libraries, to upcoming improvements to the Sage Knowledge platform, to communication and outreach strategies to faculty and we ended with a discussion of the place video has in our collection development and teaching/research environments on our campuses. I always learn so much about how other places are doing things and thoroughly enjoy the chance to talk libraries with other people as passionate about them as I am. Sitting in a room with people from the publisher side of things also is a really wonderful experience. We will not always agree on everything with publishers but in many ways we are on the same side. SAGE is always really ready to hear what we have to say and eager to discuss tricky issues with us. We covered issues of cost, Carnegie classification and pricing models, streaming video and its future as a research source, the usefulness of publisher-specific journal search interfaces, discovery services and so much more.

This year Elisabeth asked me to stay an extra day and do a presentation for the SAGE/CQ Press staff about librarians and how/where we factor in to the research and selection process in libraries. I discussed the research process as students view it, how our research assistance differs with faculty and students, the factors that we weigh when deciding to purchase something and what libraries want from content providers. It was a fun presentation to put together and the group that attended had really great questions. I have uploaded the presentation on slideshare for anyone who is curious.

ALA 2015

Tuesday, July 7, 2015 3:31 pm

In case I’d been longing for parades (turns out I had), a confluence of well-known events made the 2015 ALA Annual Conference the perfect place to be. How do New Orleans and San Francisco parades compare, you ask? San Francisco parades involve less alcohol; more illegal-smelling smoke; smaller floats; fewer thrown objects; and more daytime nudity (not pictured).

The first session I attended was put on by the Cataloging Norms Interest Group of ALCTS. Nancy Fallgren of the National Library of Medicine gave an update on NLM’s BIBFRAME pilot project, which has been underway for some time. BIBFRAME Lite is an experimental set of core elements meant to be used in the new encoding framework, and NLM is working on mapping from MARC, Dublin Core, and other non-MARC legacy formats to BF Lite. However, Ms. Fallgren emphasized that their primary focus is on creation of new metadata using BIBFRAME, not conversion. A print monograph BIBFRAME mockup is viewable here.

At the same session, Roman Panchyshyn from Kent State talked about the non-stop nature of change experienced by technical services staff in the 21st Century. Managing change has become a key function for managers in technical services departments. Traditional breakdowns between acquisitions, cataloging, serials, etc. are disappearing. This trend, I think, is reflected here in Resource Services at ZSR. Mr. Panchyschyn identified eight skills/competencies that all technical services staff need to possess in order to keep up. I won’t list all of them here (full list available upon request), but suffice it to say they are metadata-centric, linked data-oriented, and future-looking. Liberal use of hyphens, sadly, isn’t one of them.

Still at the same session, Diane Hillmann from Syracuse speculated as to whether libraries will retain their legacy metadata once conversion to BIBFRAME is complete. She concluded that this is advisable; storage is relatively cheap, and you never know when you might need the data again. “Park the MARC,” she advised, wisely I think. As to whether we are making the right choice in moving toward BIBFRAME, Ms. Hillmann said that this is a moot question: there is no one right choice, and in future we will need to be multiply conversant as metadata takes on new forms and different libraries and other cultural heritage communities decide to go in divergent directions. This is part of the promise of BIBFRAME: it is to be flexible, extensible, and adaptable.

Believe it or not, I did go to other sessions and meetings. Later on Saturday I met with my ALCTS Acquisitions Section Organization and Management Committee, and on Sunday I met with my division-level ALCTS Planning Committee, where we continued to work on a three-year ALCTS strategic plan, with new emphasis on how best to track progress on that plan once it is in place. My work on the Planning Committee has provided a broad view of ALCTS as a whole – its different divisions, its reporting structure and micro-cultures, and its direction. I’ve only completed one year of a three-year term, so I have more enlightenment to look forward to, as my power and influence grow daily.

Roy Tennant from OCLC gave a fun presentation titled “Ground Truthing MARC,” in which he made a worthy comparison between the geographical process of ground truthing and the value of analyzing the existing MARC record landscape before we move to convert it en masse. He has been performing some interesting automated analyses of the ridiculously huge universe of records present in OCLC’s database, and found some interesting (if not surprising) results. A relatively small number of tags (100, 245, etc.) make up the vast majority of instances of populated subfields in OCLC; whereas hundreds of tags are used only infrequently and, all told, constitute a very small percentage of the data in OCLC. This type of analysis, he believes, will be essential as we start to think about mapping OCLC’s data into a BIBFRAME environment.

In other presentations, Amber Billey from the University of Vermont made an interesting case that in requiring NACO-authorized catalogers to choose between “Male,” “Female,” and “Not known” when assigning gender to an authority (RDA Rule 9.7), LC is expressing a false and regressively binary conception of gender. She and others have submitted a fast-track proposal that “Transgender” be added as an additional option; this proposal would seem to have merit. Joseph Kiegel from the University of Washington and Beth Camden from Penn discussed their libraries’ experiences migrating to the Ex Libris Alma and Kuali Ole ILS’s, respectively. In such migrations technical support is essential, whether provided by the system vendor or (as in the case of an open-source system like Kuali Ole) a third-party company that contracts to provide support.

On the last day, Corynne McSherry from the Electronic Frontier Foundation discussed several important copyright-related legal cases from the last year, including Authors Guild v. Hathitrust, Authors Guild v. Google, and Cambridge University Press v. Patton. The EFF is seeking a Digital Millennium Copyright Act exception for circumventing access-restriction technology in no-longer-supported video games so that archivists can preserve them, as these games are an important part of our cultural heritage. This was an entirely new topic to me and caused me to think back fondly on the days when Halo was young and I was too, when video games weren’t things to preserve, but to play. I suppose that preservation is the next-best thing.


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