Professional Development

Author Archive

Sarah at STELLA Unconference

Tuesday, May 24, 2016 2:37 pm

Last Friday, I drove to UNC-Chapel Hill to present at the biennial STELLA (Science, Technology, and Engineering Library Leaders in Action) Unconference, which was organized by science and engineering librarians at Duke, UNC, and N.C. State. This was my first time attending this national unconference, and colleagues gathered from as far as California, Dartmouth, MIT, and the University of Florida at UNC’s Wilson Library. I went on a tour of UNC’s Kenan Science Library and Makerspace and participated in breakout sessions.



 

On Saturday, it was great to share my experience with flipping a course with VoiceThread and Audacity at the Poster Session and Digital Mixer, and there were many questions about my teaching methodology and how I developed and redesigned a science information literacy course at WFU. If you’re interested, you can view my poster here.

Sarah @ NCLA-STEM Meeting

Friday, May 6, 2016 10:43 am

NCLA has formed a new STEM Librarianship in North Carolina (STEM-LINC) round table. Along with Erin Knight, NIEHS Library Manager, and Jennifer Seagraves from Central Carolina Community College, I was invited to speak representing academic libraries in a panel discussion on “Outreach & Relationship-Building with STEM” at the April 29th meeting held at UNCG.

If you’re interested, you can take a look at my slides (link below):

Outreach & Relationship-Building with STEM from Sarah Jeong

 

NCLA STEM-LINC members will be electing new officers soon, and I was nominated for Secretary-Treasurer. Wish me luck! I am looking forward to becoming involved with STEM-LINC.

Sarah at the Empirical Librarians Conference

Thursday, April 14, 2016 1:29 pm

I recently attended the Empirical Librarians Conference at N.C. A&T State University Library. Among the many concurrent sessions that I attended, I will highlight the most relevant topics that I can apply to my future work.

“Teaching Mendeley in the Sciences”

Since faculty have asked me to teach Mendeley to graduate students, I’m participating in the Mendeley Librarian Certification Program this year. Emma Oxford is a Science Librarian who incorporates Mendeley into library instruction sessions for students at Rollins College. It was great to network and discuss some of the issues that can come up when teaching Mendeley.

“Altmetrics Context Analysis: Numbers are Not Everything”

I’ve been interested in the evolving areas of bibliometrics and altmetrics, took a continuing education course on research metrics, and co-presented with Molly Keener a few years ago. Shenmeng Xu is a doctoral student at UNC-SILS, and her presentation on altmetrics was especially informative. She recommended the following resources, some of which were new to me:

Overall, it was a great one-day local conference, and I hope to attend again in the future.

Sarah presents at AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) Annual Meeting

Tuesday, February 23, 2016 2:49 pm

Thanks to financial support from my Summer Technology Exploration (STEP) Grant and AAAS first-time librarian attendee free registration, I attended and presented at my first scientific society conference, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Washington, DC in February. AAAS is the world’s largest scientific society and publishes Science magazine as well as other scientific journals. One of the perks of attending this conference is participating in the closed beta period testing of Trellis, a new AAAS digital collaboration platform.

“Flipping a Science Information Literacy Course” presentation

I gave a presentation on redesigning and flipping my LIB 220 Science Research Sources and Strategies course to over 30 librarians at the ACRL science librarians round table hosted by AAAS. I’ve worked over the last year with the Teaching and Learning Center’s Faculty Course Redesign Program and the STEP Grant program sponsored by the Provost’s Office to convert a lecture-based course into a learner-centered flipped course to enhance student engagement and metacognition. The theme of this year’s AAAS Meeting was Global Science Engagement, and the theme of my LIB220 course will be global science/global health in alignment with the QEP on Global Wake Forest. I will give a presentation at the upcoming WFU TechXploration event on April 5th in the Benson Center, if you’d like to hear more about it.

I attended many sessions ranging from neuroscience to global astronomy to astroparticle physics.

Neuroscience

This 8am session was very interesting to me as the library liaison to neuroscience faculty and students. The most compelling research result was “dendritic atrophy” in stress-related brain regions.

Global Astronomy

I also attended astronomy sessions, and this session on the international collaboration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) was fascinating. The map below highlights which areas of the world are involved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which maps the universe on different scales.

Astroparticle Physics

This image during a presentation on particle physics clarified the significance of Higgs’ and Englert’s theory and their 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. The gist of this presentation and future research is summarized poignantly below:

“Even though it is a great achievement to have found the Higgs particle — the missing piece in the Standard Model puzzle — the Standard Model is not the final piece in the cosmic puzzle…Another reason is that the model only describes visible matter, which only accounts for one fifth of all matter in the cosmos. To find the mysterious dark matter is one of the objectives as scientists continue the chase of unknown particles at CERN.” – Nobelprize.org

I’m thankful for the opportunity to go to this excellent conference, and I’m happy to report that my airplane landed safely in the snow at Greensboro PTI Airport upon my return on Valentine’s Day. I’m excited to begin teaching my newly redesigned course next week!

 

Sarah at the APALA 35th Anniversary Symposium & ALA Annual

Monday, July 20, 2015 11:45 am

The Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) celebrated its 35th anniversary with a daylong Symposium on June 25th at the University of San Francisco. ALA President Courtney Young and President-Elect Sari Feldman opened the Symposium. The keynote speaker was Valerie Kaur, civil rights lawyer and documentary filmmaker. The theme of the Symposium was “Building Bridges: Connecting Communities through Librarianship & Advocacy”. Over 100 librarians, presenters, community activists, and writers/artists/filmmakers came together to celebrate this milestone.

My term as Secretary of the APALA Executive Board ended at ALA Annual. I became well-versed in parliamentary procedures through monthly virtual Executive Board meetings, and I gave an overview of Robert’s Rules of Order for incoming Executive Board members at ALA Annual. I also served as Co-Chair of the Archives and Handbook Task Force and co-authored the APALA Operational Manual, which was approved by the Executive Board in June 2015.

It will provide a reference for the Executive Board officers and committee chairs on committee procedures and timelines as well as provide a better understanding of the organization for succession planning.

I have been a member of the ACRL Science & Technology Section (STS) Continuing Education Committee for 3 years, and we met on Saturday morning. I am continuing to monitor the STS listserv for announcements of upcoming conferences, including science librarian boot camps, and uploading the conference links to the CE Professional Development webpage. The Continuing Education Committee also co-hosts the STS Membership Breakfast, which I helped organize. We had a great turnout, and here are a couple resources that were shared at the breakfast:

http://insidescienceresources.wordpress.com

http://iue.libguides.com/STS-informationliteracyresources

I also learned about a new-to-me teaching methodology called the Cephalonian Method, which was used in the STS College Science Librarians Discussion Group with pre-canned questions on color-coded cards for the audience. The Cephalonian Method was created by two UK librarians to increase participation in the middle of class. I’m planning to use the Cephalonian Method in my library instruction and LIB220 Science Research Sources and Strategies course.

 

Sarah at the Metrolina Library Association Conference

Friday, June 19, 2015 1:50 pm

On June 11th, I drove to Charlotte to attend the 10th Annual Metrolina Library Association Conference. The keynote speaker was Dr. Jim Carmichael who is an active member of AAUP and an advocate for intellectual freedom. At the heart of teaching, he said, “[Professors] have the right to say what we feel is the truth in the classroom.”

I attended a session on productivity apps such as KanbanFlow and e.ggtimer.com, which has a Pomodoro timer for those who use this time management method. Among noisli.com, rainymood.com, and coffitivity.com, I tested all three websites and the first two are my favorites. Check it out!

I also attended a session on instructional design, which provided some good reminders that learning outcomes should be observable, measurable, and demonstrated. Bloom’s taxonomy is helpful when constructing learning outcomes. When planning instruction, ask yourself: What do you want them to know? Need to know or nice to know?

The last two sessions that I attended were on designing staff development, and here are some points to consider:

Stakeholders: Departments, offices, student organizations, community groups could/should you include in the conversation?

Barriers: Identify any possible barriers that could arise through collaborating

Opportunities: What are some concrete and innovative collaborations that you could do around this topic?

In one session, the speaker recognized Roz Tedford who gave a presentation on developing an Information Literacy credit course for librarians at Winston-Salem State University. Go Roz!

The Living Library at Radford University is something new I learned where people can share their different perspectives, and apparently it is a growing trend in universities across the U.S. In addition, GLSEN is a recommended resource for designing inclusive programs.

 

Sarah at the ANCHASL Spring Meeting

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 2:39 pm

On March 20th, I attended the Association of N.C. Health & Science Libraries (ANCHASL) Spring Meeting at UNCG. Carrie Iwema, Ph.D., MLS, AHIP from the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library taught a 4-hour continuing education course sponsored by the Medical Library Association on personal genomics. Personal genomics involves sequencing and analyzing an individual genome. However, genetic tests from different companies can yield different test results. There have been some issues with direct-to-consumer genetic tests including potential insurance discrimination, privacy issues, accuracy, and ownership of data. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act was passed in 2008 to prohibit genetic discrimination in health insurance and employment. Since I am the Bioethics Liaison, it was great to discuss the bioethical issues of genetic testing and gene patenting. I learned about the National Human Genome Research Institute’s Genome Statute and Legislation Database and other resources to add to my research guides. It was also great to catch up with my former intern who is now a librarian at Duke Medical Library.

Sarah at ALA Midwinter 2015

Thursday, February 12, 2015 1:09 pm

The last time I went to Chicago during the winter, I came back with my first case of bronchitis. ALA Midwinter was the second time I experienced a Chicago winter, and I’m proud that I carried out my duties as Secretary of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) despite getting sick the day before the conference. I took an early Friday morning flight and attended the ACRL International Perspectives on Academic & Research Libraries Discussion Group Friday afternoon. There were three presentations:

  • “As a librarian at Salem State University, Zach Newell worked with a group of faculty to successfully write a grant to bring a group of Iraqi Fulbright Scholars to study at the University in the summer of 2014. Working with the group, he identified effective teaching strategies related to diversity, multiculturalism and social justice.
  • Thanks to special grant funding made available to campus units through University of Cincinnati’s five-year diversity plan, UC Libraries started special library programming for international students.
  • Laurie Kutner ran an ALA sponsored trip to Costa Rica in the summer of 2014. The 13 librarians from all over the U.S. worked on 3 different library projects in the Monteverde area of Costa Rica and contributed a total of 200 hours to these projects.”

The convener’s notes and presenters’ PowerPoint slides are posted here at ALA Connect.

I started my term as Secretary of APALA after the last ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas, and I have been meeting with the Executive Board virtually on a monthly basis. It was great to see the other Executive Board members at an in-person meeting on Friday evening, and I also met a couple of ALA Presidential candidates.

On Saturday morning, I participated as a member of the ACRL Science & Technology Section (STS) Continuing Education Committee meeting. It was great to catch up with other science librarians and plan the science librarians’ breakfast for ALA Annual in San Francisco. I am also serving as Co-Chair of the APALA Archives and Handbook Task Force, and I led the APALA Committees Working meeting on Saturday afternoon. The revision of the APALA Handbook is one of the President’s priorities this year.

On Sunday morning, I attended an informative program sponsored by the ALCTS Linked Library Data Interest Group thanks to Lauren Corbett. The first part of the program focused on VIVO, which is an open source semantic web application that enables discovery of research and scholarship across disciplines in an institution. Seven institutions originally participated in VIVO in 2009, and Brown, Cornell, and Duke are also current participants in VIVO, which aims to build a large web of data, greater than any one effort. If you’re interested to learn more about VIVO, go to vivosearch.org and Indiana University’s VIVO site.

Sarah at the first Science Boot Camp SE 2014

Monday, July 21, 2014 10:22 am

 

Modeled closely on the wildly successful Science Boot Camps that originated in the Northeast US and have spread West and to the far North in Canada, I worked as a conference organizer with science librarians from NCSU, UNC, ECU, Duke, and Elon and hosted the first Science Boot Camp for Librarians in the Southeast. Over 90 science librarians and medical librarians from the Southeast to Pennsylvania to California attended this 2 ½ day science immersion conference in mid-July at the Hunt Library at NCSU. ZSR Library was one of the many sponsors of Science Boot Camp SE. I served as a member of the Program Committee and as Co-Chair of the Librarian Lightning Talk sessions, and coordinated 15 lightning talks by science librarians from all over the U.S.

Science faculty from UNC, NCSU, and ECU were invited speakers on alternative/sustainable energy, data sharing, data visualization, and climate change. Other invited speakers were from Wake Forest School of Medicine on data management and data sharing of clinical trials and also from Duke University Libraries on data visualization services.

A major highlight of the conference was dinner with colleagues at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences. It turned out to be an excellent conference with inspiring talks by science faculty, researchers, and science librarians. I’d be happy to talk more about it if anyone would like to chat!

Sarah at ALA Annual 2014

Thursday, July 10, 2014 1:30 pm

I had a busy year on the Executive Board of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), which is a non-profit affiliate of ALA. I organized two APALA events in conjunction with the ALA Annual Conference including a fundraising event with a tour of Zappos corporate headquarters and the community-focused Downtown Project. Over 30 people attended including Hu Womack, who wrote a great summary! I also organized the venue for the Asian/Pacific American Literature Awards Banquet, which had over 50 attendees. The 2013-2014 APALA Literature Award recipients are the following:

Picture Book Winner: Ji-li Jiang. Red Kite, Blue Kite. Disney/Hyperion.

Picture Book Honor: Marissa Moss. Barbed Wire Baseball, illustrated by Yuko Shimizu. Abrams.

Children’s Literature Winner: Cynthia Kadohata. The Thing About Luck. Atheneum Books.

Children’s Literature Honor: Josanne La Valley. The Vine Basket. Clarion Books.

Young Adult Literature: Leza Lowitz and Shogo Oketani. Jet Black and the Ninja Wind. Tuttle Publishing.

Young Adult Literature Honor: Suzanne Kamata. Gadget Girl: The Art of Being Invisible. GemmaMedia.

Adult Fiction Winner: Ruth Ozeki. A Tale for the Time Being. Viking.

Adult Fiction Honor: Jennifer Cody Epstein. The Gods of Heavenly Punishment. W. W. Norton.

Adult Non-Fiction Winner: Cindy I-Fen Cheng. Citizens of Asian America: Democracy and Race during the Cold War. New York University Press.

Adult Non-Fiction Honor Book: Cecilia M. Tsu. Garden of the World: Asian Immigrants and the Making of Agriculture in California’s Santa Clara Valley. Oxford University Press.

I’ve also been active in the ACRL Science & Technology Section since 2004, and was reappointed to the STS Continuing Education Committee for another 2-year term. This committee coordinates the STS Mentoring Program, and I manage the Guide to Professional Development Resources for Science Librarians. The best science program that I attended was hosted by the STS College Science Librarians Discussion Group, and I shared about my work in bioinformatics. I received encouragement from my fellow STS colleagues about my efforts in the bioinformatics area. I’m also grateful to an STS colleague who encouraged me to become a conference organizer of the first Science Boot Camp Southeast, which is next week!


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