Professional Development

Author Archive

Caring for Rare Books

Monday, December 7, 2015 12:39 pm

On Wednesday, December 2, I traveled to the High Point Museum for a webinar given by the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC). The webinar, Caring for Rare Books, was given by Todd Pattison, a book conservator at NEDCC, and covered the general care of rare books.

Todd began by defining a rare book. A book is rare because of a number of factors, including age, importance, scarcity or subject matter. Todd covered briefly the primary materials encountered with rare books: paper, leather, parchment and cloth. The internal factors of these materials are sometimes difficult to correct, as some of these may have an inherent vice, such as acidic paper. He further mentioned that preservation is an essential function of every library or archive and should be part of it’s strategic plan. Todd discussed each of these materials and their inherent vices. Paper is made of cellulose and over time acids break down the cellulose chains resulting in a loss of strength. Leather, which is tanned animal skin, is naturally acidic and becomes less strong over time. The conditions each of these materials is stored in can also cause deterioration (such as high temperatures). Parchment, a general term also including vellum, is limed and scraped animal skin which is dried under tension. Parchment is very sensitive to humidity. Parchment is not as flexible as paper, but is more durable. Cloth is susceptible to light, dust, pests and mold.

Todd discussed the environment and said that maintaining a stable temperature (60-70 degrees) and humidity level (30-50%) is critical. He also discussed light, air pollutants, pests and mold. Todd advised handling rare books with clean hands (without gloves). One should remove any sharp objects such as jewelry, name badges or watches so as not to damage the materials. When turning pages, one hand should support each page from behind. Todd also discussed the superiority of powder-coated steel shelves over wood shelves and the general use of archival materials for enclosures and liners.

Following the webinar, we heard a presentation from Isabella Balthar who is a member of Preservation Services at UNCG. Isabella discussed a project in which she received a grant to develop posters and videos on basic preservation principles and best practices from UNCG. The project, called No Boundaries in Preservation, attempts to convey best preservation practices in English, Spanish and Portuguese through posters and videos.

The final portion of the day was a wet books salvage demonstration by Marianne Kelsey who is a conservator at Etherington Conservation Services. Marianne discussed three options for salvaging wet books: air-drying, interleaving and freezing.

It was a good day to learn some new things and see colleagues from other institutions. Some of us are also members of Triad-ACREN – the Triad Area Disaster Response Team. Several Triad-ACREN team members were present at this workshop.

Clamshell Box-making Workshop

Tuesday, October 20, 2015 11:42 am

Imagine winding your way through the Virginia countryside filled with 19th century homes, old barns and fall leaves lining the roads. It is beautiful, but why is my GPS taking me out here? I checked the address and it was correct. It does take a few minutes to get there, but the Cat Tail Run Hand Bindery is located in northwestern Virginia about 10 miles from Winchester.
When I finally saw their sign beside the road, I relaxed (I wasn’t lost!).

Clamshell box-making workshop at Cat Tail Run Hand Bindery

This bindery is out-of-the-way, but it is a fully equipped bindery which teaches many classes in preservation marbling, binding and box-making. The shop is a sweet little place with prayer flags and a fish pond by the entrance.

Clamshell box-making workshop at Cat Tail Run Hand Bindery

I had two teachers for the workshop: Jill Deiss, who runs the bindery and Dee Evetts, an exacting Englishman (32’s and 64’s of an inch exacting). The workshop was well structured. We were taught a basic activity by demonstration, and then we tried it out ourselves, under the supervision of Jill and Dee.

Clamshell box tray pieces ready to glue

We first measured the two interior trays and then cut out the pieces from 20 point binders board on the board shear. We glued the pieces together and held them in place to dry with weights. Each tray was then covered with book cloth and allowed to dry.

Clamshell box trays completed

Once we had the trays made, it was time to make the case. The case is very much like the cover on a book, with two covers and a spine-piece. When the case is made and covered with bookcloth, it is time to glue the trays into the case and put the whole thing in a press to dry.

Clamshell box in the press

While the case and trays were in the press, we hot-stamped the title of the book which would live inside the clamshell box onto a strip of leather and trimmed it.

Clamshell box label hot-stamped on leather

The label was glued onto the spine of the clamshell box and the box was now complete. Not only did I go through the process of making this box, but I was provided with several tools to help me. I have several small pieces of board with are 1/16″ and 1/32″ to help with measuring the size and space needed in each tray. I also have a model for the trays which shows how to trim and cut each side of the tray and in what order they should be glued down. Overall, this was a very well taught workshop. I learned the proper process for making this type of box and look forward to another trip to Cat Tail Run Hand Bindery next year.

Completed clamshell box - interior

Completed clamshell box- exterior

Special Collections Folio Project

Monday, January 5, 2015 2:17 pm

An Introduction for Craig’s Folio Review
by Tanya Zanish-Belcher, Director of Special Collections & Archives

When I first arrived at ZSR, the first thing which caught my attention was the mismatch of storage space with our SCA collections, in particular the rare book collection. This collection, numbering over 50,000 volumes, is currently stored in five different storage areas. One of our long-term goals is to review our storage environment and as part of that effort, we applied for a Preservation Assessment Grant for Small Institutions from the National Endowment for the Humanities. NEH recently notified us our grant has been approved, and Tom Wilsted, a nationally known consultant, will be visiting ZSR in early 2015 to conduct such a review (http://www2.archivists.org/prof-education/faculty/thomas-wilsted).

However, the other issue which was of immediate concern, was the fact that every folio was stored upright. It is standard practice, due to the weight of the volume, that these books should be stored flat (for more information on book sizes, please see here: http://www.abebooks.com/books/RareBooks/collecting-guide/understanding-rare-books/guide-book-formats.shtml). Craig and I discussed his completing a folio survey, which would enable us to know how much space we would need for storage, and as Craig points out below, provide him with in-depth knowledge of this part of our collection and its conservation/preservation needs. Congratulations to Craig for completing this long-term project!

IMG_2453

Photograph by Ansel Adams

In May, 2013, I began a folio assessment project in ZSR Special Collections. A folio is any item in the collection that is approximately 15 inches in any dimension (38 cm). During this project, I measured and assessed each folio item in Special Collections. This project had two goals: to identify space needs for Special Collections folio items in order for them to be stored flat (as is best for these large, heavy materials); and to identify any preservation needs with each item. There were over 3000 items that I assessed and measured in this project.

So what did I learn in a year and a half of examining these materials?

Florence Theater Tickets

-Number one, we have a wonderful and amazing collection! We hold a number of early printed titles (15th-16th century), a strong collection of items on printing, paper-making, fine press bindings and poetry broadsides. We have Irish bookplates and 18th century Italian theater tickets, prints of North American wildflowers and even marbled paper in the form of flowers. There are the old books, which are wonderful…but there are the wonderful books that are just wonderful regardless of their age. I’m only mentioning a few of these.

Primitive Papermaking- Dard Hunter

Primitive Papermaking by Dard Hunter, early paper-making pioneer

Arion Press-this fine press in San Francisco operated for decades as the Grabhorn Press, but became Arion Press in 1974. It is a very respected fine press operation which prints and binds their work in-house. We receive everything they print. Special Collections recently received the 100th book printed by Arion Press, a commemorative edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

Arion press- Leaves of Grass title page

Barry Moser- Moser is likely the most talented wood engraver and printmaker in the US. Several of his illustrations can be found in our collection. I’m including two images here. One, of Sampson and Delilah, is from a version of the Bible printed by Pennyroyal Press. The other image is the cover of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Barry Moser used former professor Allen Mandelbaum as the model for the Madhatter on this cover.

Sampson and Deliah - Barry Moser

Alice in Wonderland-Barry Moser

What were the preservation issues? I found many books that simply need a glassine dust jacket to protect it from wear and light damage. It was amazing to me how much damage light has caused to our collections. The lights in our closed stack areas are not on that much, but they have a cumulative effect. Many items were also damaged from the wear and tear of sliding in and out of the space where they are stored. Some leather bound books stained the cloth and paper books next to them as well. There are numerous more complicated repairs that I’ll need to address as well as some that should be sent to a conservator for expert repair work. I’m excited to have the opportunity to work on many of these materials.

I have not added the numbers from my measurement of each folio item in Special Collections, but this information will help us plan for a kinder storage of these irreplaceable items, hopefully flat instead of standing on their spines. I am also concerned that we be proactive in protecting items in good condition now before they deteriorate. It is a good feeling to have this knowledge and the ability to go forward with support to conserve our incredible collection.

Book Repair Workshop @ Charlotte Public Library

Monday, December 15, 2014 3:03 pm

Charlotte Public Library Book Repair Workshop Dec. 12, 2014

On Friday, December 12th, I traveled to Charlotte – Mecklenburg Public Library to teach a book repair workshop sponsored by the North Carolina Preservation Consortium. They came from Fayetteville, Gastonia, Charlotte, and Raleigh. The twelve attendees represented public, community college, university and school libraries. We also had library school students from UNC-G and UNC SILS.

This was a basic book repair workshop and so we covered the basics. The workshop was almost totally a hands-on workshop where I demonstrated a technique and each person had the chance to practice. Together, we all did tipping-in loose pages, repairing paper tears with heat-set tissue, spine replacement, paperback repair, Japanese tissue hinge repairs and replacing end sheets. One individual brought some of their own books to work on, so we also repaired those items together. I enjoyed meeting and working with this group and appreciated the hospitality of Jane Johnson and Robert Stocker at CMPL. I hope to continue these workshops into the future.

2014 Archives-Records: Ensuring Access COSA-NAGARA-SAA Joint Meeting

Thursday, August 21, 2014 2:08 pm

MLK Memorial
Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial

I attended the joint SAA conference in Washington, DC last week. The weather was great and so was the conference. In the opening plenary, Miriam Nisbet and David Cuillier discussed the “State of Access.” Nisbet, Director of NARA’s Office of Government Information Services, has worked with the Freedom of Information Act and openness during her entire career. She believes openness means a transparent and collaborative organization. Nisbet is involved with the Open Government Partnership, which tries to achieve transparency, including access to government information, passing laws and implementing them. She emphasized three ideas:

1. Records Management- This is a push in federal government to reform how records are maintained, including a push to make them electronic. She would like to build in access from the beginning of this process.

2. Open data- This is a push to pay attention to and promote information as a strategic asset and get this information out. Archivists and librarians are critically important in this push.

3. Freedom of information Act- This act provides an opportunity for the public to speak up.

David Cuillier, from the School of Journalism at the University of Arizona, made the point that one third of news stories rely on government data. Ciullier believes these stories make the world better, so it is important to get this information out. He believes this information can lead to greater public engagement. Cullier stated that Public Information officers in agencies are trying to control their message, and become very political which keeps some information from the public. Ciullier said that the Freedom of Information Act still does not work very well. Redacting is used by lawyers and others to prevent information from being available. This keeps many journalists from even using it.

people on the path
In DC, there are lots of people taking lots of photos. Usually, one politely pauses as they snap the image, before continuing down the sidewalk. I like to politely stop and also snap a photo-it makes them laugh!

Preventive Conservation in the Archives-Broad Approaches for a Big Impact

The recent idea of the “more product, less process” paradigm doesn’t usually include conservation. This session discussed using this idea in the preservation/conservation realm.

Fletcher Durant, New York University, believes risk management is at the heart of this issue. Different collections have different vulnerabilities, and every repository has its own risk portfolio. Durant analyzes risk and takes actions to manage risks and available resources. He advised getting a monitor and collecting environmental data. This helps you plan for the future. Durant also advised getting to know your facilities staff to set up a line of communication about your HVAC and any issues. He strongly advised setting an example with your food policy.

Priscilla Anderson, Harvard University Preservation, develops stakeholders across the institution to help with the difficult process of making policy and guidelines. The highest cause of damage to collections is caused by handling. So, for example, Harvard has a policy where they open rolled items only to the part you need to see. Additional strategies are removing only one folder at a time and keeping camera cords and straps away from collections. Anderson said to prepare for your next emergency by training staff.

Sarah Stauderman, Smithsonian Institution, uses surveys to plan and improve conditions. Benchmarking can be used to compare repositories, and make recommendations about care or training to try to improve the preservation IQ.

Laura McCann, New York University, believes hands-on work can be used to protect the object. At the Repository level- changing air filters, cleaning, and removing food can help. At the Collection level, avoid inappropriate housing or oversized containers. McCann built internal dividers and containers out of blue board for their collections for Item level protection (custom containers and supports using internal storage in standard archival boxes).

Persian book exhibit
Persian Book Exhibit at Library of Congress

I attended the Preservation Section Committee meeting, where we discussed trends in the preservation of AV materials. The speakers were Robert Horton, Associate Deputy Director for Library Services,IMLS; Karen Cariani, Director of the Media Library at WGBH in Boston; and Carl Fleischhauer, the American Memory Project at the Library of Congress.

I presented a poster on the Dolmen Press Collection at the conference, demonstrating the various ways we have used it at ZSR Library (LIB100, printing, research). I was really pleased with the response to the poster and met many people who knew of this collection and had great ideas to further promote its use.

SNCA-SAA-Dolmen-poster

Documenting the Epidemic:Preserving and making accessible HIV/AIDS History

A wonderful panel of experts presented on their attempts to document and preserve the history of the AIDS epidemic. Somehow, during the difficult times of the 1980’s, these individuals managed to realize that someone should try to preserve the history of the epidemic. Victoria Harden, National Institutes of Health, was very concerned that documentation may be lost about the epidemic, treatment and developing drugs to treat aids. Harden helped hold a conference and published a book on the proceedings called Aids and the Historian in 1989. She also helped with instituting an oral history archive on the AIDS epidemic called NIH SIDS Oral Histories.

Pauline Oliveira, University of California, San Francisco, discussed the Aids History Project at her library. They document news, activists and papers from clinicians and researchers because UCSF Hospital had Ward 86, which became the first AIDS clinic in the US.

Ginny Roth, National Library of Medicine described collecting four decades of material including posters, comics, books, pins and postcards.

Michael Oliveira, University of Southern California Libraries, discussed One National Gay and Lesbian archives and the good work they are doing to preserve the AIDS history. They collect periodicals, theatrical and art works, Act Up materials and newsletters.

This was an important and moving presentation.

Protecting Our Heritage: Holdings Protection Training for Your Institution

This presentation by staff from the National Archives at College Park, was great and covered strategies for preventing loss in your collections reading room. They covered how to approach suspicious individuals and tell them professionally you’ll be there if they need help. this lets them know you are watching them. If things seem very suspicious, you can perform a quality control audit to make sure nothing is missing. Bags, laptops, i-Pad covers, etc. are checked and a complete check is made to insure no original documents are missing. A fun and useful part of this presentation was an exercise where we got the chance to approach one of the presenters and question them.

The All conference reception at the Library of Congress in the Great Hall was spectacular!

Library of Congress dome

SNCA Conference in Raleigh

Friday, April 11, 2014 1:56 pm

On April 8, I attended the Society of North Carolina Archivists Conference at the McKimmon Center of NC State.
McKimmon Center, NC State

My first session was a panel discussion entitled: Publishing and Managing Digital Content without Content dm given by our own Chelcie Rowell, Molly Bragg, from Duke and Caitlin Christian-Lamb, of Davidson. Each of these three described customizing their institutional repository to meet their specific needs. Caitlin uses Lyrasis hosted Islandora, Chelcie described our customization of Dspace and Molly discussed their development of Tripod. A discussion afterwards discussed the costs of developing these stand alone systems and how much staff time costs to develop and maintain them.
Session about Institutional Repositories

Paging through History, Lessons Learned from a Scrapbook Digitization Project was a panel by Anna Kraft, David Gwynn and Kathelene Smith, of UNCG. They digitized a collection of 244 scrapbooks in their archives from 1906-2002 in a variety of conditions and contents. these scrapbooks were very compelling and the project is being used by students.

The takeaway from this session was a quote Kathelene read from Charles McIver, first President of UNCG:

“you educate a man, and you educate one person…you educate a woman, you educate a family”

I also enjoyed the Lunch Plenary by Sarah Koontz, before which I got to second a motion. Good times!

In the afternoon, I enjoyed a session by colleagues Rebecca Petersen and Vicki Johnson called
Connecting Community and Campus to the Arts. They the Secrest Series how we got that collection, created a finding aid, and the plan to create an online Bibliolabs exhibit with the visual content.

Following this session, I presented a poster on the Dolmen Press Collection.
SNCA-SAA-Dolmen-poster

I then heard a session by Tanya Zanish-Belcher and Erin Lawrimore on the Archives Leadeship institute held at Luther College. Great program.

I enjoyed the SNCA meeting this spring. Rebecca is the new VP!

Society of North Carolina Archivists Exhibits Workshop

Monday, April 7, 2014 8:57 pm

On Monday, April 7, I attended an exhibits workshop sponsored by the Society of North Carolina Archivists at the NC State Library in Raleigh. This workshop was led by three UNC-CH librarians: Linda Jacobson, Andrea Knowlton and Rachel Reynolds.

Sculpture at NC State Capitol
Sculpture at NC State Capitol

The day began with a group exercise where we took a variety of containers on our table (ceramic, wood, metal and plastic). My group decided to design an exhibit for children on recycling. The idea for this exercise was that you can design an exhibit using a theme. We came up with our theme, as did everyone else, by looking at an array of dissimilar objects on our table. After sharing our ideas with the group, we moved on. Advanced planning is often necessary as a way to get loaned artifacts in time, to allow time to write the copy and labels and give the opportunity to produce the individual exhibit elements.

The main point of Rachel’s discussion of exhibit labels was: exhibit labels should be written with the audience in mind, not an individual’s colleagues. Labels are best when they are easy to read, and written in simple, direct language. Rachel Reynolds emphasized you should know your key points and make them first in your text (in case the viewer stops reading after the first paragraph). One should avoid technical jargon or expect people to have prior knowledge of people, events or places (apparently the Air & Space Museum has found this out since many current visitors have no memory of the Apollo Space Program). Rachel said you should have one idea per sentence and one subject per paragraph.

Linda Jacobson followed with a short talk focusing on font size for good readability and best color contrasts. We all laughed as one of the following slides had really bad color contrast. Back in our groups, we used an English census record to think about designing an interactive exhibit. Following this discussion, we all designed an exhibit case on paper, complete with photos, text, and captions.

Polyester corners holding a document
Polyester corners hold this feline print on archival board

In the afternoon session, Andrea Knowlton spoke about the use of approved, acid free and archivally safe materials used in constructing the exhibit. Fact: did you know Mylar is no longer made and has been replaced by a product called Melinex? Believe it! Most exhibits designers now use polyester.

Cutting foamboard for labels

Trimming labels mounted on foam board

We looked at a number of materials used in exhibits such foam board, archival museum board, acrylic mounts, adhesives and polyester strapping. Andrea mentioned light exposure for most library materials is 5-10 foot candles and less for sensitive materials ( wood pulp papers, 19th century photos, watercolors, and colored ink or felt tip pen drawings). Mitigating light damage may be done by using UV sleeves over fluorescent bulbs and UV filters on exterior windows, and of course by using curtains and turning off any lights when possible. Andrea also discussed supports and book cradles. After which, we had an activity in which we made a book cradle and cut labels we put together on foam board. This was a super useful workshop.

Spring Training at Duke

Friday, April 4, 2014 10:42 am

Winter is over. It’s time to shake out the kinks: hit a few balls, scoop up a few grounders, run the bases and try to throw the ball from left field to home plate. That kind of thing is what I did this week on a visit to Duke University’s Conservation Services Lab. Thanks to Tanya Zanish-Belcher for encouraging me and to Beth Doyle, the Leona B. Carpenter Senior Conservator and Head, for arranging the training. I was fortunate to have an afternoon with Erin Hammeke, Conservator for Special Collections and the Conservation staff (Tedd Anderson, Rachel Penniman, and Mary Yordy). For me, the afternoon was wonderful and a time to talk turkey with like-minded people.

Erin Hammeke performs magic

Erin began with an overview of the types of leather encountered on books from various regions: sheep and calf for American and English bindings; calf and pig for German; goat for Spanish and Italian bindings. Erin advised us to consider the type of leather before attempting a repair as well as using a leather consolidant,like Klucel G (which is the one I use). She then demonstrated sharpening her lifting knife on a leather strop and proceeded to lift the leather from the spine of a book. We all the a chance to practice on discarded books.

Lifting leather

Erin demonstrated three techniques for joining loose boards to a leather bound book. These methods are the Etherington tissue hinge( Etherington 1995, 2006), which I have been using, and which employs Japanese tissue internally and externally to re-attach loose boards.

The second method, board tacketing (Espinosa and Barrios 1991) is a technique which involves drilling small holes through the shoulder and loose board of a book and joining them with linen thread.

Tackets

The third method is the Brock hinge (Brock 2001, 2006) which uses a piece of cloth, attached at the head and tail of a book to strengthen the board attachment.

Following this, Mary Yordy demonstrated a technique that she developed to reinforce the head or tail of a leather bound book. This technique, which uses L-shaped pieces of Japanese paper glued inside the spine, should be very useful when a book is in tact but has a partially damaged spine.

This was a very enlightening and useful training day. I learned some great techniques, discovered a few new tools and materials, and met new friends. Thank you Duke Conservation!

Book Repair Workshop at Mt. Olive College

Monday, March 10, 2014 12:49 pm

Important location in Mt. Olive, NC

On Thursday, March 6, 2014, I taught a Basic Book Repair Workshop at the Moye Library of Mt. Olive College in Mt. Olive, NC. The workshop was sponsored by the NC Preservation Consortium (NCPC). Mt. Olive College is a small, church-sponsored college and they have some of the same collection interests as does ZSR Special Collections and Archives Baptist Historical Collection. The school holds a collection of their religious newspaper, called the Free Will Baptist Advocate, which, like The Biblical Recorder, has roots in the 19th century.

Basic Book Repair Workshop

The workshop was attended by library staff from Campbell University, UNC Wilmington, Davidson, Forsyth County Public Library, ECU, and Mt. Olive College. I am always amazed at howe eager many libraries are for basic information and skills on how they can repair and maintain their collections. It is rewarding to teach these workshops and get this positive response.
We spent the day learning how to tip-in loose pages, use heat-set tissue to repair paper tears, tear and use Japanese paper to repair loose hinges, and replace damaged spines. At the end of the day, we repaired many of the books the attendees brought from their home libraries. This was a fun and useful wrap-up of the day. All-in-all, this was a great workshop.

Tri-State Archives Conference – Greenville, SC

Tuesday, October 22, 2013 12:17 pm

Furman entrance sign

Greenville, South Carolina was a busy spot this week as the Tri-State Archivists Conference opened with archivists from North and South Carolina and Georgia. The conference opened with an exciting talk about the Digital Public Library of America by Emily Gore. Emily, who formerly worked at NC Echo is now one of five individuals working for DPLA. This portal allows users to (as DPLA likes to say) search, browse and explore. DPLA hopes to have 5 million records when they roll it out in a week. Their content comes from partners such as the Smithsonian, Hathitrust, NYPL and Artstor. All the data that comes into the DPLA is free under Creative Commonslinked open data. Geonames uses uri streams to replace authority records and generate more exact description. One of the fun things Emily mentioned was Unglueit and she mentioned the book, So You Want to Be a Librarian, by our friend, Lauren Pressley.

Sculpture-reflection

One of the sub-themes of this conference was oral history. Several presenters spoke on this topic and how they were using the audio of oral histories in their institutions. Our lunch speaker was Cliff Kuhn of the Oral History Association. Cliff spoke about the resurgence of oral history as technology has made these projects viable on the web. Projects such as Storycorps have shown what the possibilities are for local oral history projects. Cliff spoke about the
ramifications for the archival community for oral history projects. The IMLS supported project at Michigan State University, Oral History in the Digital Age sought to create best practices and reach practitioners. This helped to rekindle an interest in sound and oral history. Cliff mentioned many projects worth exploring, such as, The Uprising of 34 which describes a strike in Georgia in 1934; Memoryscape which offers London/Thames walking tours and Serendip-omatic, a project that connects your sources to digital materials located in libraries, museums, and archives around the world.

At lunch, I met the folks from Spartanburg, SC Public Library who were about to present. I couldn’t resist going to their session which was about their oral history project called: Attics to Archives. Their library lost much of their photographic collections due to a management takeover in the past which caused much of their collections to be discarded. They partnered with local groups, organizations and used internships from Converse College and work with public history classes to do much of he work. At one point, they even handed out 3D glasses.

Spartanburg SC session using 3D glasses

I attended a great session next called: Pinning, Tweeting and Likes, or How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Social Media as an Outreach Tool. This session was given by Beth Doyle and Josh Hager of Duke University. Josh used a Facebook based outreach to conduct interviews with archivists across he country to see how they were using Facebook. Josh found that many fb pages were created for the simple reason that everyone was doing it. Other reasons for using fb were raising the profile of the institution, to raise money, and collection based outreach.
Josh mentioned several rules for using fb:
…think visually…fb is made for pictures.
…think collaboratively…interact with other institutions and share each others content or try to get them to share an archival item.
…think intrinsically …value is relative to your audience and what they are looking for.
…think narrowly.. create an identity for your page. He used this statement as an analogy for this ‘narrow’ idea: “think of us like a friend with a great record collection.”

Beth Doyle, Head of Conservation at Duke spoke on the topic: Conservation Goes Social. Beth uses all social media for her work. Some of her ideas are the “Quick pik series” which is a one-off way of showing conservation work. Also, Iowa State and Duke collaborate on the 1091 Project(1091 is the number of miles between Duke and Iowa State). In the 1091 Project, they both write about the same project from their perspective. The Devils Tale is a project about what’s being done in the conservation lab. Beth’s primary site is called Preservation Underground, and was nominated for the Salem Press Library Blog award for its innovative use of the blog to tell their story.
Beth’s Lessons:
…Be sure you have the time to maintain your site
…Post weekly
…Shorter is better eye catching title
…Limit acronyms
…You can push content to all your sites
…Have fun
…Be professional
…Read your post before you post

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention two ZSR-related events at the conference. Rebecca Petersen and I presented our poster on Clarence Herbert New: A Man of Extremes to a packed corridor!

CHNew-poster

Also- Vicki Johnson and Rebecca Petersen both presented. Rebecca spoke about Archives Week and Vicki spoke about our Documenting Diversity event lat year. Both of these stellar colleagues were excellent and well-received by the audience….so proud!


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