Library Gazette

In the 'Staff' Category...

5 Questions for Bobbie Collins, Social Sciences Librarian

Thursday, April 16, 2015 4:36 pm

Photo courtesy of Chelsea Tamura and LENS Summer Program.

On November 1st, 1990, Bobbie Collins set foot on the campus of Wake Forest University and began her career as the Social Sciences Reference Librarian at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library. As a Tennessee native with a background in Education, Bobbie had originally embarked on a path to pursue school librarianship, but after working at the University of Tennessee Graduate Library as a Research Assistant in the Reference Department, she decided to continue a career in academic librarianship.

After 24 years with the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and Wake Forest University, Bobbie will be retiring on April 30th. But before she flies the coop, she sat down with me to discuss her fabulous career and share her insights, memories, and lessons from a life in the Library.

We talk a lot about change in libraries, but there are some things that remain the same. From your perspective, what has changed and what has stood the test of time?

Technology has changed how we deliver some of our information. For example, researchers now have access to electronic journals and electronic databases. Probably one of the biggest changes was saying goodbye to the card catalog. The card catalog served us well for generations. It was an exciting time for libraries when the online catalog was introduced. My first experience with an online catalog was at Texas A&M University in 1982. I helped to develop an instructional program to train students and faculty on how to search the online catalog. Through the years, we have seen enhancements and improvements to the online catalog. Search functions are more sophisticated, and the user interface has definitely improved. It is interesting how people take technology for granted. There was a time when there was no email, no online resources. In April 1992, an email instruction class was offered to ZSR staff members. Email enabled us to launch our popular AskZSR email reference service, and now we can assist patrons beyond our building.

What has remained the same, I believe, is our mission and our basic service. We still collect materials (books, journals, etc.), organize them, and provide access to them in order to help the WFU community succeed.

With the exhaustive amount of information now available online, do you have any words of advice to offer patrons for finding the information they need?

I like to ask myself, “where could that be hiding?” I like to think of information as being packaged, for example, words are packaged in dictionaries, journal citations in indexes/databases, statistical/factual information in almanacs. I’m always thinking, “where would somebody put that?”. This stems from a time before electronic sources, when you had to consider who was printing that information at that time. Are you going to find it in multiple sources? This is not as true today, maybe because the web has provided people with the ability to use search engines to find that kind of factual or statistical information themselves, and they are not used to consulting specialized resources. The questions we receive today are more advanced and require further knowledge about where an item or piece of information may be stored and how can we access it.

What is your favorite library space at ZSR, and why?

I sometimes like to visit levels 7 and 8 on the Reynolds Wing, and another place I really like is Government Documents on Reynolds 4. I enjoy looking at all of the old government documents, and finding interesting items to browse. There are many little gems waiting to be discovered in those stacks. Just browsing the stacks, I have been able to find resources that I can use when responding to student research inquiries. With resources such as the Public Papers of the Presidents, students who are researching the 1960s and the moon landing can read John F. Kennedy’s “Moon Speech”.

There is no doubt you’ve helped countless patrons, and taught multitudes of students about academic research. What are some of the lessons that you’ve learned from your work at ZSR?

One thing that I love about being a reference librarian is that every day presents a new challenge. So one of my ZSR lessons is to always stay curious. There is always something new to learn, and I am hoping to remain curious– that is one thing that has sustained me throughout my whole career. When I don’t have the slightest clue as to a topic or a piece of information, (like ostrich farming in North Carolina ), I have the drive to look further.

Looking back on your career, what are some of your favorite ZSR moments?

There are so many different ones, it’s hard to narrow it down. One that definitely comes to mind is moving into the new Wilson Wing. It was so nice to have an instructional classroom (Room 476). Before the move, librarians delivered instructional sessions in the middle of the Reference Department (where Government Documents is now located). Another one would be in 2009, when I mentored Carolyn McCallum for a period of time as she developed instructional material for Information Literacy instructional sessions. Carolyn nominated me for the “Helping Hands” award, and I was honored for assisting a colleague.

Congratulations on your retirement, Bobbie! And thank you for your years of dedicated service! You will be missed!

5 Questions for Molly Keener

Monday, February 23, 2015 2:44 pm

Molly Keener, Scholarly Communication Librarian

In honor of Fair Use Week (Feb. 23rd – 27th), we have 5 Questions for our Scholarly Communication Librarian, Molly Keener. As the Scholarly Communication Librarian, Molly supports faculty and graduate students in understanding and managing copyright, new methods and models of scholarly publishing (including open access), and sharing scholarship. In her 6 years at ZSR Library, she has assisted countless faculty with thorny copyright questions, managed the Open Access Fund to support publication, and championed greater sharing of scholarship created at Wake Forest University.

What is Fair Use and why is it important for libraries and higher education?

Fair use is a provision within the Copyright Act that gives people the right to make limited uses of copyrighted content without permission from the copyright owner(s). Generally, fair use covers news reporting, commentary, satire, parody, and educational uses. For libraries, fair use is important because it is what enables us to offer services such as electronic course reserves, for our patrons to make photocopies of materials for personal use, for our colleagues digitizing content in our special collections and archives…the list goes on. In higher education, fair use is critical for generating new scholarship and expanding knowledge: articles can be shared, poetry can be read aloud, films can be shown and critiqued, and works can be excerpted and cited.

What are some of the common misconceptions about the Fair Use doctrine?

One common misconception is that fair use is hard to use. It isn’t (well, not always). In fact, I wager that everyone reading this has relied on fair use–albeit without knowing it. Ever shared a photo online that you didn’t take? Get permission? No? That’s a fair use. Ever used a direct quote in a paper (with double-quotes and attribution, of course)? That’s also a fair use.

Another common misconception is that you cannot use a work in its entirety and it still be fair. That may be true in some circumstances, but not all. There are plenty of times where using the full work is necessary for your purpose and is justifiably a fair use. For example, our family and friends sang “Happy Birthday” to my son last summer when he turned 5. “Happy Birthday” is still protected by copyright, but we all sang the song in full, without nary a concern for copyright. Why? Fair use (and fun!). We didn’t limit ourselves to only one stanza, or to n% of the song. People try to apply bright line limits to fair use, often in an attempt to establish clear yes/no boundaries, but those bright lines are difficult to establish and apply unilaterally, as each instance of fair use must be assessed independently.

When we’re presented with a copyright question at the library, we don’t immediately say, “Nope, sorry, can’t;” rather, we evaluate for fair use, assess our risk, and make informed decisions. We don’t let ourselves be unduly intimidated by copyright.

What do you enjoy most about your role at ZSR?

That I never know what question I will encounter next! I’m the only librarian in ZSR to do exactly what I do, so I am the go-to for questions relating to copyright and scholarly publishing. My work has necessitated researching French and EU copyright laws, emailing British publishers, writing letters to Congressmen in Washington, and explaining copyright basics to folks on campus. I’ve even researched copyright and trademark as it relates to the circus–twice!

When you help someone make sense of what was murky, be it related to copyright, open access, funder compliance, or publishing agreements, it’s a wonderful feeling. Witnessing their “Aha!” moment is rewarding.

What areas of your personality strengthen the work that you do?

I am details-oriented, and love an intellectual challenge. I also am not afraid to call a spade a spade, so I am direct in my assessment. That said, I’m also willing to acknowledge when I don’t know enough and will seek guidance from my peers at other institutions.

What has been the biggest influence on your work?

Chance. For many years, my sights were set on law school, until I landed my first library job working in Circulation for my father’s freshman year roommate when I was a sophomore at my parents’ alma mater (that lovely light blue school down the road a ways…shh…). I then decided to become a librarian, with aims to work at a small, private liberal arts college, probably in reference. But a chance conversation with my grad school advisor led to a summer internship at Wake Forest’s medical school library, the Coy C. Carpenter Library, where a year later I landed my first professional position. When I started at Carpenter, I’d never heard of scholarly communication, but was asked within my first month on the job to revamp their program. I have many, many more examples of how chance–chance encounters, chance conversations, chances to say yes–has influenced my career and work. Much like not knowing what questions I’ll encounter, I never know when I’ll have my next chance…but I’ll likely take it!

 

5 Questions for Le’Ron Byrd

Friday, January 30, 2015 9:37 am

Le'Ron Byrd talks with Maggie Perez Vincente ('15)

Welcome to our 5 Questions series! These mini-interviews introduce our dedicated staff and faculty, and share behind-the-scenes stories about the work that we love to do! In this installment, we caught up with the ZSR Library Fellow, Le’Ron Byrd (’14). As the ZSR Library Fellow, Le’Ron has worked with the ZSR Library Administrative Team in a year-long position as a full-time staff member of the university.

Le’Ron, you also worked with ZSR as a student assistant during your undergraduate experience. How has your view of ZSR changed from working here as a student assistant to your current experience as the ZSR Fellow?

I worked as a student assistant in Access Services throughout my undergraduate career and I thoroughly enjoyed interacting with people who approached the main desk. As a student assistant, I had the unique opportunity of getting to know not only my immediate supervisors but some of the library staff. They truly are amazing people and are enthusiastic about their jobs on a daily basis. What changed once I became the Fellow was my overall perception of the staff and faculty here at ZSR. I learned that that each individual here in the library (even those who work behind the scenes) are committed to working hard towards bringing ZSR’s mission– to help students, staff, and faculty succeed– to life. It is honestly something that amazes me every day I come into work.

As the ZSR Fellow, you have a hand in work that goes on behind the scenes and in the public eye . . . What have been some of your favorite contributions?

It’s hard to identify a particular favorite project because it’s not about the actual project to me, it’s about having the opportunity to collaborate with others. I mean, let’s be real… ZSR is home to the best staff and faculty here at Wake Forest. Everyone in this building is excited at every opportunity to show why ZSR is the heart of our campus. It shows during Wake the Library– which would be my favorite “project” if I had to choose.

What’s next, and what’s your best advice for the next ZSR Fellow?

Next is continuing to work in academia. I was so sure I wanted to go right into law school next year but being a Wake Forest Fellow has taught me that I still have a lot more to learn about myself before embarking on my career. Thus, the best advice I have for the next ZSR Fellow would be to come into this position open-minded about yourself. Do your best to not visualize your time as the ZSR fellow as a means to an end. You can discover so many opportunities during your tenure as the fellow.

Has your opinion of libraries or librarians changed? How so?

Oh absolutely! I now know how complex libraries are and how far along ZSR is, as it relates to other academic libraries. In particular, I’ve learned how many different departments exist inside of libraries and how they all function together to make the institution work. I mean… working at a library has defeated my preconceived stereotypes of librarians too. ZSR librarians are so much more than people who shelve the books and are louder than most people imagine! They’re actually quite humorous.

What are some of your favorite ZSR memories?

(smiles) As a student during Finals Week watching the sun rise in the Atrium, after pulling an all-nighter. Although pulling the all-nighter was quite terrible, watching the sun rise in the Atrium made the painful experience a little better. My second favorite memory happened as the ZSR Fellow in November. I helped bring ZSR to China alongside the Wake Forest Advantage Program. While in China, all I could think about was my first day working in ZSR as a student assistant in 2010. I just never thought I would have gone from being a student assistant in ZSR to an advocate for ZSR in different countries.

 

The Office of the President is currently accepting applications for the 2015-2016 Z. Smith Reynolds Library Fellow. For more information, or to apply, visit Wake Forest Fellows Program. Applications are due by February 6th.

ZSRx Digital Publishing: The Reckoning

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 5:24 pm

Back in the Fall of 2013 (when we were all young and innocent), a young librarian named Billy was approached by a nice library dean and asked if he wanted to conduct a MOOC of his own. He agreed, under one condition: pro humanitate. As such, our (normally shy) hero enjoyed complete autonomy and/or academic freedom re the content of the thing. This is his story. This is history. This is the dramatic story of ZSRx Digital Publishing.

Our friend Kyle had a platform, but needed content. Billy happened to have content, but needed a platform. Either way, Lynn had the “students.” And so the deal went down: Bill would record three modules’ worth of digital publishing-related content, provide external links and readings, conduct online (and “plausibly live”) discussions going for about three weeks, and promise to keep the distracting Tom Waits clips to a minimum, with Kyle massaging said content into the Canvas platform, all while Lynn would recruit some registrants.

Meanwhile, I used primarily the (free) screen-capture program called ScreenCast-O-Matic, and it was awesome, in that it recorded my yammering in front of PowerPoint slides and online websites in such a way that I didn’t really even need a firm script, and so the clips had the distinct feel of a loosey-goosey (who me?) lecture — complete with my incessant stammering and ill-paced cadences. (Honestly, ten minutes of that at time is plenty.) These clips were published directly to my YouTube channel (everyone has one, btw), which Kyle would then “embed” into the Canvas platform, so we didn’t need to bother with fancy/costly video production (or lighting (or makeup (though we probably could’ve stood some of the latter))) or other hassles regarding video storage or distribution. (And I was ready with a rejoinder if anyone might’ve complained about the homemade/rickety aspects of the clips: you get what you pay for.)

Anyhow, we sent come-hither emails in January to various listservs (ASERL, Library Publishing Coaltion, WFU Alums, etc.) and waited. I bought a press release, which got picked up by LJ online, and we waited some more. By the time the course started in February, we had about 400 students signed up — librarians, publishers, vendors, parents, friends, neighbors, homeless people — mostly from North Carolina and the U.S., but some international folks. And since there were actually at least one student each from the continents of Europe, Asia, and Australia, it’s fair to say that ZSRx Digital Publishing was a global phenomenon by the time it officially launched in February (right after the SuperBowl).

We rolled out one “module” a week, for three weeks, with each module consisting of maybe 1 hour’s worth of video (in maybe 6- to 12-minute segments) and links and readings and discussion considerations. I would send a jaunty “announcement” each week, and Kyle and I would prompt some “engaging” discussions based on that week’s module’s content. The discussions turned out to be a hoot and a half — we had a nice handful of maybe a dozen regular contributors, who helped move things along.

Speaking of moving along, I better get around to telling the dark side of my mini-MOOC: there was some distinct attrition, participation-wise. That is, though we had ~400 folks sign up, and though those folks consumed thousands of pages of web content, the course analytics indicated a pretty significant (if typical, according to Kyle) drop-off:

Still, and though the formal exit survey is yet to come, I did fashion a fun little “final exam,” wherein I left some room for “final thoughts,” and here’s where I’ll perk back up by quoting exactly what some students said therein:

  • I appreciate the time that was spent putting this together!
  • I did learn a lot, although I was definitely a passive learner simply because of other commitments for my time!
  • This was an awesome MOOC!
  • I learned so much about digital publishing that I never had an inkling about!
  • Every MOOC should be this much fun!
  • Very interesting course. Thank you for offering it!
  • Enjoyed the course; lots of good information!
  • For my first “online” course…I really enjoyed this!
  • Thanks for your time and effort to put this together!
  • Mindboggling – the amount of digital information and books available!
  • Thanks!!

Not gonna lie, the exclamation points got to me.

And so I’ll close now by just stone-cold declaring my personal and genuine feelings about the whole deal (minus any and all hint of irony or sarcasm or impatience (of which I’m sometimes accused)): my participation in ZSRx has been the highlight of my career at Wake Forest University (and maybe anywhere) so far. And I can’t thank Kyle and Lynn and everyone at ZSR Library enough for allowing me the honor.

–wpk

 

 

Access Services Retreat-July 24, 2013

Friday, July 26, 2013 2:14 pm

The Access Services Team, comprising the staff that provide Circulation, Stacks Maintenance, Interlibrary Loan, Course Reserves, Offsite Storage services and more, had a day long retreat on July 24. The purpose of our team retreat was to allow us to get away from our regular daily work and get some fresh perspective, get questions answered, air concerns, and problem solve as well as plan for the future. The team started the day at the New Winston Museum which was a great place to have our morning meeting. The Museum staff were very gracious and accommodating. We had the place to ourselves all morning. Chris, the Director of Programs, and Katherine, the Executive Director were both there to welcome us and make sure we had all we needed. During our break, they turned on the exhibits so we could see the videos that were lining the walls and learn more about what was on display.

During the three and a half hour morning session we discussed strategic priorities and directions and identified how we might address the challenges we faced (including such hot topics as the MUVZ project, preparing for future building renovations, demonstrating value to our constituencies, and student assistant management and evaluation). After our morning meeting, filled with constructive ideas, note taking, and of course, laughs, we adjourned to the Old Salem Tavern, which is right around the corner. (Try the Syllabub topped with strawberries for dessert. Delicious!)

After our lunch, we walked over to Salem College to meet up with Anna Milholland, newly ensconced Public Services Librarian at the Gramley Library, who gave us a tour of the library. We saw the collection, their study rooms, the combined services desk. The library is tiny by comparison to ours, but it seems to fit their needs nicely. Anna graciously snapped this photo of us all after the tour.

We finished the day by walking to “God’s Acre” the Moravian Cemetery at Old Salem on a quest to see where RJ Reynolds and Z. Smith Reynolds were buried. While it was a hot and humid afternoon, and we didn’t quite know where we were going, we had a vague idea and started across the cemetery grounds. Armed with a flickr photo that Susan Smith provided, and the memory of Ellen Makaravage who’d been there 20 or so years before, we found the site after one false start, (we discovered the “wrong” Reynolds brother’s grave first. )

It was an enriching and entertaining day. There is great value of spending a day apart from your regular job, as it ironically brings work life into better focus. It allows us to see more clearly how all of the pieces of our operation interconnect and gives us the ability to streamline our operations, think outside of our regular boxes and work more closely together the rest of the year.

 

Library folks reading books!

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 4:56 pm

Today, Kaeley, Joy, Molly, Carolyn, Mary Beth, Kevin, Craig, and I got together to discuss Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing To Our Brains. We had enthusiastic and interesting conversations about the book, which broadened to address work, ethics, community values, and built on some of the discussion we had as a larger group on Monday. It was great fun, and any of us would be happy to continue the discussions if you’re interested.

We had so much fun we decided to do it again! Over Spring Break we’d like to get together to discuss another book that has implications for work and our personal lives. Those of us in the room thought it’d be interesting to read David Weinburger’sToo Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room. However, we realize some people didn’t make it that have other interesting book ideas, and could easily be persuaded to choose another one. Leave a message in the comments if you have other book titles you’re interested in, and we’ll find a way to select one and a date for our March discussion.

ZSR Rocks Habitat for Humanity in 2011

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 5:57 pm

The 2011 ZSR (and Bridge) Habitat Crew

Mary Beth, Giz (top). Barry, Craig, Anna, Wanda, Susan, Steve, Rachel, Chris: this year’s crew!

For the third year, ZSR Library faculty and staff stepped forward to spend a day working at Wake Forest’s Habitat for Humanity House. We had a big crew this year with enough manpower to work on two different houses all day. Once again, we were fortunate to be supervised by Tony, who assured us that the only skill set he expected from us was to be breathing! He and his supervisors are some of the most patient instructors I’ve ever seen. Just think about having to start every day with a group of brand new volunteers! But they calmly showed us how to hold a hammer, use a power saw, and straighten out a bent nail. Before long, all of us were productively hammering, cutting wood, moving scaffolding, and even shingling a porch roof. As usual, all of the ZSR volunteers had a very rewarding experience, even with all the sore muscles that went home with us at the end of the day. Next year, we hope to send another team of enthusiastic house builders (for a day)! Check out a few pictures from the day!

The ZSR Habitat crew would also like to thank our colleagues who covered for us back at the library during this very busy time. Another volunteer was impressed that we had a fabulous team back at the library that would support our ability to be there for the entire day.

Liberian Students visit ZSR

Friday, September 16, 2011 3:45 pm

Wake Forest University is hosting two visiting students from the University of Liberia in order to continue to strengthen the ties between the two institutions after the visit that Lynn and others took there in the spring. The two students, Jacob Jallah and JoeWilson, had an opportunity to visit ZSR this afternoon and it was my privilege to tour the two of them around the building and highlight some of our existing services. I also discussed aspirations that we have for the library and how our existing infrastructure made it challenging. We took a leisurely tour of the building starting on the 8th floor and ending on Wilson 1. The tour included stops in the Special Collections Reading room where Megan gave a brief overview of the collection, how it developed, and explained the current exhibit on display that is in conjunction with the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible. The two had an opportunity to handle a book that was over 600 years old, and while they needed a little coaxing to actually touch it, ended up requesting that I take their picture with the book and Megan. We also visited the Writing Center, room 401, the terrace and the new DVD/viewing room where we had a chat with Mary about the new space. The auditorium was in use, so we only got a brief glimpse into the room, but couldn’t enter it. On Wilson 4, I took them into the Mandlebaum Room. While showing them our newspaper collection thinking that they might be interested in how many international papers we subscribe to, they showed me that their picture was actually on the cover of the Winston-Salem Chronicle! I had them sign our copy immediately! Sarah gave them an overview of our Reference collection and discussed our Lib100 and Lib200 classes. They asked about online books and she shared how to access Google Books as well as how to get access to our databases. Since Joe is an Economics student and Jacob is a Sociology student, we showed them how to get into The Economist and found a “freely available” copy. They were excited to see that! We then traveled to the Bridge where I highlighted the services they provide and I showed them the MultiMedia Lab. Then down to Wilson 1 to show our mobile shelving as a solution to our overcrowded shelves. (Talk about an embarrassment of riches!)

We returned to the circ desk and had about 15 minutes to spare so I took them into Starbucks to buy them some tea. They both found the chilly NC day unexpected, and needed some tea to warm up! I asked them about how their visit was thus far and they said everyone was friendly and welcoming and unlike what they had been told to expect in the States, everyone has been willing to take the time to help them out. They arrived last Saturday and when they were picked up were excited to discover that they could go and see a football game…only to be surprised that it wasn’t football! (They were, of course, expecting soccer.) Their time had been pretty scheduled, but they did have some opportunity to provide input on which events and departments they were most interested in seeing. They will be on campus until October 2nd before returning to Liberia. I encouraged them to come and make use of our services and our collections until then.

ZSR Zephyrs Compete in 2011 Staff Summer Olympics

Friday, July 29, 2011 4:00 pm

ZSR Zephyrs Summer Olympic Team 2011

ZSR Zephyrs 2011: Erik Mitchell (doing his farewell tour), Gretchen Edwards (bringing a new generation of spirit to the team), Rebecca Petersen (a new speed rival to Erik), Susan Smith (oldest Zephyr around), Mary Beth Lock (major cheerleader and team Pollyanna about our weekly chances at winning), and Barry Davis (sport photographer and voted most willing to do anything but swim)

ZSR Library once again fielded a team for Campus Recreation’s annual Staff Summer Olympics, this year called the “Biggest Winner Summer Challenge.” The library has had a team in the 8 week-long event since its inception in 2003 (minus the lost year 2007, that’s another story). The format has changed over time, as have the team members. Only two original members remain: Erik and Susan! And for you curious readers, here is the Gaz article from the first year we competed (when we won the cup!)

As always, there is an activity component where, this year, each individual could earn up to 5 points daily for doing cardio, strength or by taking CR classes. New this year was a weight/fat loss angle that was accompanied by 2 nutrition lectures (don’t ask how we all did on that one!). That left 6 weeks of Wednesday athletic competitions that included old favorites such as bowling, water polo, quadrathlon, Frisbee golf and table tennis. The last day is always a mystery field day. This year Erik did a backward run then paired up with Susan for the wheelbarrow portion. Gretchen had to put on a vest, backpack and helmet to sprint to where she exchanged the gear Mary Beth who then bicycled back to the start line. Our pictures demonstrate that the Olympics remain a great deal of fun and a wonderful way to get to know colleagues better across campus!

This is Erik’s last showing as a Zephyr and he managed to go out in a blaze of glory winning the overall individual award for most exercise points earned over the 8 weeks. Is anyone surprised?

 

 

Recent Technology “Lunch and Learns” – Let’s Keep It Going!

Thursday, July 21, 2011 3:26 pm

Last Thursday ZSR hosted a Google+ “Lunch and Learn” that was attended by a dozen members of the WFU community. This Thursday, three people attended the Spotify “Lunch and Learn” to hear about this new “invitation only” application for streaming and sharing music. Both of these came out of an interest by the staff to discuss and explore new technology. I would like to try to keep these going as cool new technologies become available. If you have suggestions let me know! Just today Bill Kane showed me BookLamp.org a beta site that matches readers to books through an analysis of writing styles, similar to the way thatPandora.com matches music lovers to new music. Send me cool tools you discover and let’s see if we can learn more about all these new technologies!


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