Library Gazette

In the 'Outreach' Category...

Humans v Zombies – Spring Semester 2014

Monday, February 10, 2014 4:17 pm

HvZ Group Portrait #2

On Friday, February 7th 2014, from 7-9pm, the ZSR Library held its 9th “Humans v Zombies” event. We’ve hosted these once a semester since the Fall of 2011 and last summer we hosted two HvZ events for summer students and international students. Of the approximately 120 students who attended, a little over 30 of them were students at Chapel Hill who made a three-hour drive to attend our two-hour event. One staff member even brought her six-year-old nephew and escorted him through the zombie horde!

Students played two games in two hours and polished off ten pizzas, a dozen bottles of cola and several gallons of ice water. This was the last game of HvZ for John Walsh, the founder of this new tradition in ZSR, and we were happy it was such a successful event! John has passed the torch to student, Brandon West, who will keep the tradition going. Thanks to ZSR Ambassadors, John Walsh and Skylar Marker, and ZSR Staff, Susan Smith, Mary Beth Lock, Tim Mitchell, David Link and Chris Burris for all their help running this event. Special Thanks to the Student Activities Fund for their support of these events! You can check out photos from the event at: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjS3E5Gv

 

New ZSR Programs for WFU Alumni

Monday, December 2, 2013 11:21 am

The Z. Smith Reynolds Library understands that the need for good information does not stop when you leave college. In fact, sometimes it increases. That is why ZSR has provided library borrower cards to alumni free of charge for years. But we are always looking for ways we can assist our alumni who do not live close enough to take advantage of our print resources. We are now pleased to announce that we can provide access to three EBSCO databases (Academic Search Alumni Edition, Business Source Alumni Edition and Business Book Summaries) for use by WFU alumni from any computer anywhere in the world. For more information or to log in, visit the ZSR Alumni Portal.

Save the dates of April 4-5, 2014, for a weekend of intellectual engagement for alumni, co-sponsored by the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and the Alumni Office. Familiar faculty and campus leaders will discuss the theme of well-being from all sides, including; emotional, intellectual, physical, financial, occupational, environmental, spiritual and social. There will even be an opportunity for alumni to give their own lightning-round talks around these themes. If you are interested you can get on our mailing list by contacting Lauren Suffoletto, our ZSR Fellow!

Finally, ZSR is continuing its popular series of online courses, ZSRx, this spring. ZSRx is an effort to bring lifelong learning opportunities to the greater Wake Forest community. Offered by ZSR, these free online courses are designed to be informal ways to connect alumni, parents and families to new skills and ideas in an interactive online learning environment. The successful initial course, “The Cure for the Common Web,” was followed this fall by a course designed for Wake Forest parents: Deacon Development 101. Upcoming offerings include: Digital Publishing, Winter 2014 and Social Media, Spring 2014. Sign up to be updated about future offerings on our ZSRx page.

In these new programs and in all we do, ZSR strives to live up to its mission of helping our students (past and present), faculty and staff succeed.

Pizza and a Movie @ ZSR!

Saturday, November 30, 2013 7:55 pm

On Saturday, November 30th, the ZSR Library hosted “Pizza and a Movie” for any students remaining on campus during the Thanksgiving break! This idea developed from Dean Sutton, based on feedback from students who were on campus over Thanksgiving last year and needed more services. ZSR opened on Friday and Saturday to help meet the study needs of our students, and we hosted “Pizza and a Movie” on Saturday night to give these students a study break. Dean Sutton arranged for ZSR to sponsor the event, and together with Sarah Jeong, Lauren Suffoletto, we arranged a screening of Marvel’s “The Avengers”, ordered a dozen pizzas from Papa John’s and bought sodas and cookies for the event. We had 34 people show up for pizza. 2/3 were undergraduate students, about 1/3 were graduate students. We also had a few staff attend as well. One of the Faculty Fellows, Allison McWilliams came with some of her first year students and Greg Moreau, from Residence Life and Housing came by to check it out and support the event! Fewer students stayed for the movie than expected. Now we know for next year that the food is the draw for this event!

Big Games at ZSR!

Monday, September 2, 2013 2:51 pm

This time of year brings my annual recap of Capture the Flag @ ZSR, but this year is different! I’m recapping four different student events held in July and August.

First, in July, we hosted the new student athletes, the Bridge students and numerous summer school students for our first Capture the Flag and Humans v Zombies dual event. Seventy-eight students attended this event! Next, 42 attendees and program assistants from the LENS program (http://lens.wfu.edu/) joined us for a wild game of Humans v Zombies on July 25th from 10-11pm.

In August, we faced construction challenges during the atrium window project, but that didn’t slow us down! On August 20th, we hosted both the SPARC (http://service.campuslife.wfu.edu/sparc/) and International Students. These 120 students played both CtF and HvZ . Lastly, on August 30th, we had 150 students attend our annual, campus-wide, Capture the Flag event, co-sponsored with SAF, who generously funded the event again this year!

I need to wrap up this post with a big shout out to Susan, Mary Beth, Lauren S., Tim, David, Carolyn, Chris, Meghan W., Sarah, and student, John Walsh! (And Tanya, who had to come in one night to silence an alarm!) Thanks to these ZSR volunteers and other outside of ZSR, we had plenty of staff for these events to run smoothly! I can’t thank them enough!

ZSRx: The MOOC that wasn’t a MOOC

Friday, May 10, 2013 1:37 pm

Remember that time ZSR offered an online information literacy course? No, not that one. This one. The one we designed to be MOOC-like, free and open to anyone, focused on general web literacy skills, in the hopes that *maybe* 100 people would want to sign up. No? Well, let me tell you about it.

Let’s start at the beginning. It was a little more than two years ago that Lauren Pressley designed and taught her online version of LIB100, the first online course of any kind at Wake Forest. She worked hard to create a “Wake Forest” feel to the course: lots of reflection, video responses, close contact. And it worked. She was asked to go before the College Board of Visitors to show them what she’d done, and they were impressed. I’m told that many came up to Lauren after her presentation to ask how they could take her class. This was all before I came to ZSR, of course, but I know enough about this place to understand that when the College Board of Visitors wants to take your class, you find a way to let them take your class.

So we found a way. We gave LIB100 the MOOC treatment: we generalized the content and learning outcomes, focusing on web literacies that are relevant to everyone. We curated third-party content from around the web, finding readings, videos, and websites that anyone could access and easily fit into their busy schedules. We set up a discussion forum and a community blog. We organized everything into thematic modules and built a simple website with free tools to hold it all together. We called it ZSRx: The Cure for the Common Web, and then we told people about it, focusing our marketing efforts on parents and alumni, hoping 100 or so would be interested enough to sign up. Then 700 people signed up.

Let me tell you, dear reader: there’s nothing more real in the life of an eLearning Librarian than when 700 people show up to your party. It was terrifying. I was ecstatic.

As people started introducing themselves on the discussion board, we learned that we had participants from 23 states and 10 countries. There were parents of current and former students, alumni from the class of 2012 all the way back to the class of 1954 (old campus!), and folks here on campus who were just interested in what we were doing. We had folks who had very little computer or web literacy and folks who had taught online for the University of Phoenix. I met an alum living in Florida who is close personal friends with the minister who married me and my wife. People started connecting to old friends, swapping stories of their time at Wake, reminiscing over favorite professors. Although introductions were coming fast and furious, it all felt very… small.

Each of the four modules focused on a different aspect of web literacy. Module One focused on being a more strategic web searcher, Module Two on advanced search tools and techniques, Module Three on privacy, filtering, and SEO, and Module Four on using free web apps to make life easier. For each module, there was more content and more opportunities to participate than I expected anyone to actually get to in a week. The idea, as I shared with participants, was not to try to learn everything the course had to offer, but to treat the course as one would a candy dish–to pull out the one or two things that look most appetizing, and be OK with leaving the rest. If they learned one new thing each week, I emphasized, the course was a success.

It’s strange, actually, calling ZSRx a course. It felt vaguely “course-like,” in that it had a beginning and an end, students and instructors, content that was organized to address learning objectives, and interactions between participants and facilitators. And learning was happening: that much was obvious from the discussions. There wasn’t any traditional assessment of learning, though: no quizzes or assignments. And I think that was a strength, as it forced participants to rethink what a course is and what a course can be online. Although ZSRx was modeled after MOOCs, it was certainly not massive, and it was definitely not impersonal. ZSRx wasn’t a MOOC: this was Wake Forest gathering around a collection of online content and using it as a tool to learn new things as a community. This was a community and a platform for informal learning, and it was awesome. If you’re interested in participation numbers and feedback, I’m working on making it look pretty, but you can see what I’m working with here.

I see offering courses like ZSRx–lightweight, informal, communities wrapped around a collection of content–to be a huge opportunity for libraries of all kinds. We have so much more to offer to the MOOC discussion than locating public domain images or providing copyright assistance for “traditional” MOOCs (if there is such a thing). Libraries have always been hubs of their physical communities–let’s start being hubs of our digital communities. I’ll be helping that process along in the coming months by creating a more robust template of the course with lots of documentation for getting a course like this running for your own community. For now, here’s a quick-and-dirty version of the template. Use it if you’d like!

Finally, a special thanks to Lynn Sutton, for trusting me enough to do this crazy thing, and to Roz Tedford and Hu Womack for being right there alongside me during the planning and running of the course. This isn’t the last of these we’ll be doing. Stay tuned!

Humans v Zombies-The Zombie Horde is Growing!

Tuesday, February 19, 2013 3:39 pm

On Friday, February 8th, the Library hosted the fourth Humans v Zombies event, and the zombie horde is growing! We held our first event in the Fall of 2011, one year after we began hosting games of Capture the Flag as part of freshman orientation! As you can see from the chart below, Humans v Zombies is a very popular event!

HvZ Chart

HvZ Chart

This semester, 22 students from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, joined us for the event, bringing us to 125 students total! The students from UNC usually play outdoors, so they enjoyed this chance to play indoors. Susan Smith took some great pics, including a group photo of the UNC team. We gave them a round of applause for making the trip to Winston Salem to join us and encouraged them to come back in the Fall for our big Halloween Humans v Zombies event!

Thanks to Susan Smith, Mary Beth Lock, Tim Mitchell, and Chris Burris for their help running the event! It is always a team effort! Also, a big thanks to the Student Activities Fund, whose generous funding makes these events even better!

 

Meet the Library Ambassadors, 2013

Thursday, January 10, 2013 3:50 pm

Pictured:Emily West, John Walsh, Tyler Keith (top row); Courtney Abernathy, Jenny Miller, Mary Beth Lock, Nella Hendley, Nora Kane (bottom row) Not pictured: Jesus Vega, Melissa Simonelli, Rosie Faccone, Liz Hughes, and Kaley Pelingra.

In the Fall, 2011 semester, the Library Ambassadors began as a class project by a student who was interested in increasing student involvement in ZSR programs, providing a ready made “focus group” of interested individuals who care deeply about the library and giving students a streamlined method to have their opinions about the library heard. While the original Library Ambassador, Katherine Feeney, has graduated now, the idea she started has taken root and grown into this year’s Library Ambassador team.

This past fall, the Ambassadors assisted the library staff volunteers with “Wake the Library,” helping the entire event go smoothly. They also brought fresh new components to our program, for example, suggesting that we hand out candy as a pick me up to students studying in the library during finals. Together, they generated other ideas that will be rolled out in coming months. We anticipate great benefits will come from our partnership and look forward to working with them so we can make ZSR an even more welcoming destination for students looking for a place to study, meet, collaborate, and learn.

Need more info? Contact Mary Beth Lock or reach out to one of the Ambassadors!

Documenting Diversity Initiative

Wednesday, October 3, 2012 11:16 am

In celebration of National Archives Month and North Carolina’s Archives Week (October 22-28), ZSR’s Special Collections and Archives is reaching out to invite departments and student groups across campus to deposit their paper and electronic documents in the University Archives. We particularly encourage submissions from groups underrepresented in the Archives, such as WFU’s ethnic minority, LGBTQ, and international communities. We want to identify, locate, secure, and make accessible these important and at-risk historical records.

The Documenting Diversity initiative seeks to raise awareness of the importance of preserving the historical records, especially of under-represented groups. We will provide consultations and guidelines for the transfer of non-current records to the Archives.

Documenting Diversity kicks off with an Archives open house event in the Special Collections Reading Room from 4-5 pm on October 25th. Members of the WFU community will have the opportunity to see the University Archives, drop off materials, view some collections already housed in the archives, and discuss the future of a more inclusive and well-rounded University record. Light refreshments will be served. Participating departments and organizations include

We encourage all interested individuals and groups to attend the Archives open house and to contribute appropriate materials to the University Archives. If you plan to attend, please register for the event. For more information, contact Rebecca Petersen.

Capture the Flag @ ZSR

Sunday, September 2, 2012 2:06 pm

Since August of 2010, the ZSR Library has hosted a game of Capture the Flag on the first Friday of the fall semester. While geared toward introducing freshmen to the Library, this event is open to all! This year we had 200 students attend, up from 150 in 2011. Each semester we work to improve the event. This year we were fortunate enough to get funds from the WFU Student Activities Fee that allowed us to serve pizza and soda for 200 before the event and get new black and goldbandannasfor the teams!

I have to give a big shout out to the volunteers this year. Susan Smith and Mary Beth Lock (and family!) managed the entrance desk and circulation desk where 200 people dropped off keys, wallets and bags in a 10 minute period! (We’ve learned to have plenty of brown paper bags to secure everyone’s loose items at these events.) Chris Burris also volunteered, helping keep order and shovel empty pizza boxes out of the building. It really takes five volunteers to run this event, but we can do it with four, and we always make it fun! We also had some members of ZSR drop by for the event! Kyle Denlinger brought his family by and Roz Tedford and Patrick Morton came by to experience the chaos and fun first hand.

In two hours and 15 minutes we played three games of “Capture the Flag.” Two long games, one with each team having one flag, and one with each team having a standard flag and a human flag, and finally, to wrap up the evening, we played one super short, fast, game with no tagging!

For the Spring semester, we will publish detailed rules online in advance, to help novice players prepare for the event, and we have some great ideas for making it even more fun! Next up, Humans v. Zombies on Friday, October 26th from 9-11pm! Bring your Nerf Shooter or dress like a zombie!

Creative Writing Adventure Draws Students to Campus

Thursday, July 12, 2012 3:03 pm

This morning I had the pleasure of giving a library tour to 15 students who are participating in the Great American Writers’ Camp for grades 5-8. This is my second year working with Catherine Coelho (’10, MA ’12). Unfortunately, this year they did not have as much open time as they did last year so I was not able to do a hands-on activity with them. Catherine suggested a brief walking tour (15-20 minutes) of ZSR that would highlight some of the fun history of the library.

During the tour, I asked students questions about Wake Forest. When I asked the group when Wake Forest was founded, one young man replied “1834.” The other students were very impressed with his answer. As we walked through the building, I shared some interesting facts and statistics with our young visitors. For example, I mentioned the number of staff in the library in 1946. Students were amazed that only five staff and eight student assistants were employed. When asked how many students the library employs today, one young man said “a bunch.” When I mentioned that over 200 students are employed, several of our young visitors exclaimed “wow.”

I knew that time was limited so I set up three computers in Government Documents to demonstrate the wide variety of our electronic resources. The first computer showed the front cover of an electronic government document entitled Project Apollo the Tough Decisions. The second computer projected an image of two dinosaurs from a journal in our K-12 database from EBSCO. The third computer showed the search results for a search for Louisa M. Alcott in the ProQuest Historical Newspapers database.

The last stop on the tour was the Reference Department where I showed them a digitized copy of the first issue of the Old Gold and Black. When I asked the students if they had a student newspaper, a young girl commented that her school did.

The walking tour really impressed our young visitors. When we went down to level one on the Reynolds side, several students remarked that it was “scary.” They really enjoyed the view of the atrium from level six. During the tour, I tried to cram in as much history as I could about ZSR. I hope they left with some good stories and interesting ZSR facts to share with their friends.


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