Library Gazette

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#myzsr Guide to Finals Week: Finding Your Happy Place

Sunday, November 23, 2014 9:05 pm

ZSR and the The Writing Center are teaming up to bring you the #myzsr Guide to Finals Week– a weekly series of valuable advice, tried-and-true strategies, and insider information to help you survive THRIVE during exam week! This week’s installment . . .

Finding Your Happy Place

You don’t have to be a New York City real estate mogul to understand the key concept in property valuation– it’s all about location, location, location! Just ask any seasoned WFU student about their study habits & they are likely to provide a list of reliable campus locations that provide the ideal setting for an effective study spot. Location is key. And not just any location, but one that matches the desired characteristics for a comfortable & efficient study space. If you are still searching for your perfect study space, check out our list of recommended spaces in ZSR, on WFU campus, & beyond!


ZSR Spaces:

For Absolute Silence

The 6th, 7th, & 8th Floors of ZSR are designated Quiet Zones
The 24 Hour Study Room (across from Starbucks)
The Basement floors on both Reynolds & Wilson wings
The Ammons Gallery / Red Room (Room 401)

Hidden Gems

The ZSR Special Collections Reading Room
Balcony Nooks on Wilson 4 & 5
Video Conferencing Room / ZSR Room 204: Located on the hallway that runs behind the Circulation Desk on Level 2 of the Reynolds wing (ask for directions at any service desk). The room seats 38 and provides access to ample power outlets.
Study carrels and Tables on Wilson 6

For Group Study

Book a Study Room
Tables in the Atrium & on the 4th floor of the Reynolds Wing (GovDocs area)
Room 476 (Wilson 4)
Starbucks

Soon the Writing Center will be posting information on their Facebook page about how you can win study time in the Writing Center classroom during finals week. Like our page and check back soon!

Elsewhere on Campus:

Campus Grounds
Zick’s
Reynolda Hall
Benson study rooms & public areas
Tribble
Kirby & Manchester
Business Information Commons at Farrell Hall
North Campus Dining Hall
The Green Room in Reynolda
Subway

Venturing Beyond Campus:

Twin City Hive
Camino Bakery
Krankies
Ardmore Coffee
Panera

 

More Advice for Setting Up Your Study Space:
(for students, by students!)

“The most essential part is that if you’ve allocated a certain time to study, use it to study. That means do whatever it takes, but don’t end up on that same old social media haunt or trawling the internet instead of doing the work that needs to be done.”
- Matt Avara (’17)

“If you don’t have a space reserved it’s helpful to have a short list of spots in your head for when you are looking for a place to study in ZSR. Find some areas that are suitable for your type of studying (dead silence for some, a little activity for others). Most importantly in choosing a spot in ZSR is finding a place with outlets. The majority of areas around here have plenty, but there is nothing worse than working for an hour then having to move because your computer is about to die.”
- Evan Altizer (’17)

“After having worked in the Special Collections archives this past summer (6th floor of ZSR), I would recommend that students visit and take a look at some of the rare book collections/displays, as most people seem unaware that Special Collections even exists. The main room looks like a scene straight from Harry Potter, and students are welcome to study there when researchers aren’t using it!”
- Kristin Weisse (Graduate Student, English Department)

Share your expertise!
Let us know what you look for in your ideal study space, or provide a recommendation! Add your comments below, or share with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram.
Don’t forget to add #myzsr!

#myzsr Guide to Finals Week: 5 Research Hacks to Know

Monday, November 10, 2014 8:28 am

ZSR and the The Writing Center are teaming up to bring you the #myzsr Guide to Finals Week– a weekly series of valuable advice, tried-and-true strategies, and insider information to help you survive THRIVE during exam week! Week One: 5 Research Hacks to Know.

They’re coming. Getting closer. You can feel it in the air, and see it on the faces of everyone around you … DUE DATES! Luckily, ZSR has some research tricks that can help you save time, reduce stress, and maintain your balance, as assignments start to stockpile. So, without further delay…

5 Research Hacks to Know:

 

1) Get started with a Research Guide!

ZSR Librarians have created comprehensive online Research Guides to help you get started with any research assignment. We offer Research Guides in every academic discipline, and guides for research-related tools (such as our Citation guides and Zotero guide). The guides offer recommendations for relevant databases, journals, and other information resources– all librarian-approved. A great starting point for all assignments!

2) Database Search Tricks

Boolean Operators
Use AND, OR, NOT to combine your search terms, so the database understands what you are looking for. Using AND indicates that all words must be found in the results (ex. violence AND media AND children), using OR indicates that at least one of the terms provided must be found in the results (ex. sea OR ocean OR marine), and NOT excludes results containing a particular term (ex. bears NOT Grizzly).

Truncation
Use the root part of a word with an asterisk, which will provide search results that include all forms of the root word used (ex. chin* will retrieve China, Chinese . . . religio* will retrieve religion, religions, religious, etc.)

Phrase Searching
Use quotation marks around keyword phrases to indicate that these words be searched as a phrase, in the exact order you type them. Ex. “global warming” OR “stand your ground law” will provide results with both of these exact phrases.

3) Citation Aids

One word– Zotero.
This incredible Citation Manager is free, easy to use, and ZSR offers instruction on how to get started with this software.

Our search interfaces also provide citation assistance through various “cite” functions. You can cite search results from the homepage search by hovering over the item, and selecting “CITE” from the right column.

You can also cite items directly from their record in our catalog. From the item record, select the “* Cite this” option above the featured item. For more help with using these Citation Aids, please Ask ZSR.

**KEEP IN MIND**: With all automatic citation generators, you still need to check these citations to make sure that they conform to their appropriate style guidelines. They give you a starting point, but they may have errors.

4) Target your search results with Filters

Use the filters in the search results page to refine and get more targeted results. You can filter by:

  • Full text online
  • Scholarly/peer-reviewed
  • content type (books, journal articles, magazine articles, etc.)
  • publication date
  • language
  • discipline
  • And much more!

5) Drop in for Research Assistance (and Cocoa)!

Our *cozy* drop-in Research Assistance Sessions– Sources, Citations & Cocoa– are offered during the end of the semester. ZSR Librarians are on hand to provide assistance for students at any stage of their research process– narrowing a research topic, finding scholarly articles and supporting research, and building citations. Oh! And we offer a veritable buffet of delicious treats and beverages to boot! This semester, we are offering Sources, Citations, & Cocoa sessions on:

Mondays from 3:30pm-7:30pm,
starting November 10th and running through December 1st.

Of course, if you can’t make it to any of these sessions, you can always schedule time to meet with a librarian for a Personal Research Session.

Alright! Now that you know how to hack it, hit those books! :)

Book-tacular Fun at Project Pumpkin with the ZSR Ambassadors!

Sunday, November 9, 2014 2:08 pm

ZSR Ambassador and Student Assistant, Megan Franks, reports on the Z. Smith Reynolds Library’s recent participation with Project Pumpkin!

On October 29th, the ZSR Library participated in a longstanding Wake Forest tradition, Project Pumpkin, for the first time. Project Pumpkin is a frighteningly fun time on the Upper Quad of the Wake Forest campus. Children from the Winston-Salem community are invited to go trick-or-treating at dozens of booths set up by student organizations and campus departments. Besides the pure joy of candy, there are also activities and games at each booth for the children to participate in. This year, over 900 children were brought to Wake Forest to participate! Of course, ZSR had to get in on the fun.

bookmarks, stickers, and markers for Hallo-Read activity.

Hallo-Read book marks are ready for young readers to decorate with spooky stickers and art supplies.

ZSR staff members collaborated with members of the ZSR Ambassadors group on a Project Pumpkin booth. The Ambassadors are a group of students who plan fun events year-round in the library and promote the library’s services to the wider community. The staff members and the Ambassadors decided on a book-tacular “Hallo-Read!” theme. The ZSR booth was scattered with stickers and markers so the children could make their own bookmarks. There was also a handful of spooky Halloween books from the Education library on hand, in case anyone wanted a quick scare!

The President of the Ambassadors, Heidi Gall, and the Vice President, Madison Cairo, expressed their excitement in having a chance to serve the Winston-Salem community and also in getting more involved with the Wake Forest community of organizations. The volunteers at the booth throughout the day were all smiles as the kids approached in their cute costumes. The bookmarks were a hit – the kids loved being able to create something of their own to use in their books at home! And of course, the handfuls of candy weren’t a bad deal either.

All in all, everyone had a blast on this windy Fall day, celebrating the holiday and the community. The Ambassadors look forward to participating in more campus traditions, as well as giving back to the campus itself – with Wake the Library! Every year, the Ambassadors collaborate with ZSR staff to bring fun and food to the students studying hard for their final exams in the library. This year promises to be a great, grand time. And fear not, for there will be candy galore at this event as well!

Megan Franks is a senior from Kernersville, North Carolina. She is a psychology major. She works at the circulation desk and absolutely loves the library, and loves having the opportunity to flourish!

Did Google Drive Just Become Our Institutional Repository?

Friday, November 7, 2014 7:20 pm

Spoiler alert.

Odds are, you didn’t notice that sometime in the last couple of days, the tiny text in the bottom left corner of your Google Drive display stopped saying something like “3GB (10%) used of 30GB” and now just says “3GB used”. That’s because Google no longer has any limit on the storage available to WFU accounts. This is part of a rollout they announced a few weeks ago giving limitless storage to their Apps for Education customers. (Okay, there is one limit: individual files cannot exceed 1TB in size. But if you have a hundred 999GB files, you’re good to go.)

This gives students and faculty an open ended space to park their notes, photos, music, backups – you name it. It can also be storage space for articles, with control over who gets access to them, and likewise data files. In one fell swoop, Drive has become part of the discussion in topics like Open Data and Institutional Repositories. Earlier today, I heard a LITA Forum keynote that stressed (among other things) that “Workflow is the new content” and that repositories need to work with scholarly authors to meet their needs and convenience, not the other way around. Now Drive is a drag-and-drop option from everyone’s desktop, and we need to think about that for a bit.

Did Google Drive just become our institutional repository? No, of course not. The IR has to handle archival responsibilities, provide sound metadata and discoverability, and offer the imprimatur of university branding (think of WakeSpace as an imprint). But Drive did just make itself one attractive answer to a bunch of related questions, and we need to be on our toes to keep other answers, like WakeSpace, viable.

Adobe Digital Editions – Update

Tuesday, November 4, 2014 7:34 am

Last month, I posted some information about privacy issues related to Adobe Digital Editions, version 4.0. The quick summary is that the ADE 4.0 reader app was:

  • Reporting a lot of reader behavior back to Adobe (what you were reading, when, what page you were on)
  • Reporting metadata for all ADE-encrypted e-books found on your system
  • In some circumstances, reporting metadata for other books on e-reader devices attached to your computer
  • Doing all of this unencrypted, making it easy for Bad Guys, Government Agencies, Sys Admins, and just about anyone else to eavesdrop on the communication

This had the potential to affect any ZSR users who downloaded EBL e-books to their Windows or Mac desktops and read them in the ADE app.

Adobe has now released ADE 4.01, which makes important improvements. First, and most important, the communication back to Adobe is now encrypted. Second, the Electronic Frontier Foundation has confirmed that ADE is no longer reporting metadata of books it finds on your system. It now appears that ADE only reports the first time you open an ADE-encrypted e-book.

We should note that encrypting the communication now makes it much more difficult to see what it contains. Adobe could backslide on privacy issues and users will be unlikely to see the difference.

The important takeaway: the few people in ZSR who use ADE should upgrade to version 4.01 at their earliest opportunity.

 

What Makes a Great Horror Film?

Thursday, October 23, 2014 5:29 pm

Steve Jarrett, Director of Media Facilities in the Communication Department and cinema aficionado, provided an excellent elaboration and a list of recommended viewing, when we asked him, “What makes a great horror film?”

What makes a great horror film? It’s too easy just to say that if it scared you it did its job. By that measure, the Zyklon roller coaster at the Dixie Classic Fair would be a great work of art, and so would the phone call from the doctor about that suspicious spot on your chest X-ray. A great horror film, for my money, is not so much scary as disturbing. It doesn’t make you jump out of your chair; it makes you squirm in your chair. A good horror film touches on mortal dreads.

The wellspring of these mortal dreads is the lizard brain that lies buried under our neocortex. When our dreams tap into this roiling swamp of primordial emotional ferment, we call it a nightmare. The cinema, as it happens, is especially well positioned to do the same. Consider that when viewing a film we are typically in the dark, with limited sensory input. Ingmar Bergman put it this way: “No other art medium … can communicate the specific quality of the dream as well as the film can. When the lights go down in the cinema and this white shining point opens up for us, our gaze … settles and becomes quite steady. We just sit there, letting the images flow out over us … We’re drawn into a course of events – we’re participants in a dream.” The cinema experience may well be as close as we can get to the dream state while still fully conscious. It follows, therefore, that some of those cinema-dreams are bound to be nightmares.

All great art puts us in touch with our essential humanity; the spark of divinity we carry within us. Great horror films do so by drawing us into waking nightmares that compel us to confront the demons that live in the basement of our psyches, cloaking those demons in fantasy imagery. This confrontation, of necessity, calls forth our better angels as counterpoint. We come away reassured that confronting our mortal dreads is, after all, survivable.

5 Lesser-Known Horror Films that are Worthy of Attention:

  • VAMPYR (1932) Loosely based on Sheridan LeFanu’s “Carmilla,” Carl Theodor Dreyer’s moody vampire film is light on plot but densely packed with striking fantasy imagery. Once seen, it is never forgotten.
  • MAD LOVE (1935) This is one of several film versions of Maurice Renard’s novel THE HANDS OF ORLAC, in which a concert pianist’s injured hands are surgically replaced with the hands of a recently executed murderer. Following the surgery, the hands seem to exert a will of their own, showing more interest in returning to their former occupation than in making music. This version of the story draws on the theatrical tradition of the Grand Guignol, in which luridly melodramatic staging of elaborate acts of violence was foregrounded. The film was directed by Karl Freund, who was the cinematographer for METROPOLIS and other German classics of the 1920s, and the mad surgeon is played with delicious villainy by Peter Lorre.
  • I WALKED WITH A ZOMBIE (1943). Never mind the title. Trust me, this is the best zombie movie you will ever see. Producer Val Lewton oversaw a series of intelligent, literate B movies for RKO, of which this is one of the best. The uniformly cheesy titles were dictated by the studio, and Lewton didn’t bother arguing to change them. As a result, a series of cinematic gems from his production company hide behind titles like CAT PEOPLE, THE LEOPARD MAN, and THE BODY SNATCHER.
  • EYES WITHOUT A FACE (1960) George Franju’s melancholy classic tells the doleful tale of a surgeon so obsessed with restoring the former beauty of his daughter, whose face had been disfigured in an accident, that he kidnaps young women and attempts to transplant their facial skin onto hers. Moody and oppressive, this film is most often described as “poetic.”
  • THE CHANGELING (1980) Not to be confused with the completely unrelated 2008 Clint Eastwood film of the same title, this shivery ghost story has been unjustly overlooked. It belongs on the same shelf with such better known ghost movies as THE HAUNTING (1963), THE INNOCENTS (1961), and THE UNINVITED (1944). George C. Scott plays a composer whose family has been torn from him in a tragic automobile accident. Suddenly and jarringly alone, he buys himself a new house, and in short order finds that he is less alone than he thought.

For more from Steve Jarrett, check out our Library Lecture Series film Double Jeopardy: Nightmare Cinema and the Doppelganger“.

Want more horror film (or other film) recommendations?
Want to offer a movie recommendation?
Visit the Recommended Viewing Board in the DVD Room on the 4th floor of the Reynolds Wing at ZSR.

 

Patron Privacy and Adobe Digital Editions: The Situation at ZSR

Thursday, October 16, 2014 11:53 am

Threat level: goldenrod. We’re okay – see summary at bottom.

[To avoid confusion, note that there are two separate pieces of Adobe software discussed here, with very similar names. Adobe Digital Editions (ADE) is a library of tools to enforce digital rights management; for library e-books, this usually means encrypting it so that it can only be opened until its loan period expires. Adobe Digital Editions Reader, version 4 (ADE4) is one reader program that works with the ADE rights management. Reader programs other than ADE4 can use ADE to open encrypted books.]

Last week, several library- and tech-world sites reported that Adobe Digital Editions Reader, version 4 (ADE4), was doing two bad things:

First, it records data that we would consider private, but which (at least arguably) verifies you aren’t a pirate: your ADE4 license (who you are) and the license for your copy of the book. In addition, it logs your IP address (where you are); metadata for the book you’re reading, the time and date you start and stop reading; and the specific page you’re on and when you go to that page.

ADE4 has also been shown to record metadata for e-books on your system that are not encrypted with ADE rights management. In some situations, ADE4 also scans e-book readers or tablets attached to your computer to see what books are downloaded there. All of this information gets transmitted back to Adobe.

Second, the data is transmitted to Adobe unencrypted. This makes it visible to anyone with access to network log files, or anyone snooping on an unencrypted wireless network (not the WFU wireless, but for example a no-password network in a coffee shop).

There are a lot of ethical and possibly legal issues here, but the situation at ZSR is this. EBL downloads are encrypted with ADE to enforce checkout periods. That would be a problem, except:

  1. We instruct students to read EBL books in their web browser. In EBL’s world, this is not a “download” and so they do not use any ADE rights management.
  2. We believe that users who download ADE-encrypted e-books primarily do so to read on tablets or e-reader devices. We point them to the Bluefire reader, which uses ADE, but does not report reader behavior to Adobe like ADE4.
  3. WFU does not include ADE4 in the standard software load.
  4. Other e-book sources we provide do not seem to use ADE or and digital rights management (yay!), mostly because they offer no way to download a complete book for offline reading (boo!)
  5. E-Books purchased through Amazon, Google Play, or other sources do not have ADE rights management (drop a comment if you know any that do), but often have other digital rights management tying them to a specific reader program.

As of October 16, Adobe is promising an upgrade within the next week or so that will encrypt the data ADE4 sends back to them. However, they insist that the data they’re logging is reasonable and covered by their end-user license agreement.

Some further reading:

TL;DR Summary: The ADE4 e-book reader program violates library patron privacy. Downloaded EBL e-books use Adobe’s digital rights management and could be read in ADE4. However, we believe other available options give ZSR patrons access to this content without the threat specific to using ADE4. Our users are at low risk from this threat, but should be aware of it.

Books that go bump in the night: Recommended horrors, thrillers & ghost stories

Thursday, October 9, 2014 3:49 pm

Halloween is close upon us, and this season of ghosts and ghouls offers the perfect opportunity to curl up with a scary story. The following horrors, thrillers & ghost stories are recommended from ZSR Librarians and staff members, and are guaranteed to send chills up your spine:

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
First published in 1959, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House has been hailed as a perfect work of unnerving terror. It is the story of four seekers who arrive at a notoriously unfriendly pile called Hill House: Dr. Montague, an occult scholar looking for solid evidence of a “haunting”; Theodora, his lighthearted assistant; Eleanor, a friendless, fragile young woman well acquainted with poltergeists; and Luke, the future heir of Hill House. At first, their stay seems destined to be merely a spooky encounter with inexplicable phenomena. But Hill House is gathering its powers—and soon it will choose one of them to make its own.

The Other by Thomas Tyron
Holland and Niles Perry are identical thirteen-year-old twins. They are close, close enough, almost, to read each other’s thoughts, but they couldn’t be more different. Thomas Tryon’s best-selling novel about a homegrown monster is an eerie examination of the darkness that dwells within everyone. It is a landmark of psychological horror that is a worthy descendent of the books of James Hogg, Robert Louis Stevenson, Shirley Jackson, and Patricia Highsmith.

Salem’s Lot by Stephen King
Ben Mears has returned to Jerusalem’s Lot in the hopes that living in an old mansion, long the subject of town lore, will help him cast out his own devils and provide inspiration for his new book. But when two young boys venture into the woods and only one comes out alive, Mears begins to realize that there may be something sinister at work and that his hometown is under siege by forces of darkness far beyond his control.

The Last Werewolf by Glen Duncan
Jacob Marlowe has lost the will to live. For two hundred years he has wandered the world, enslaved by his lunatic appetites and tormented by the memory of his first and most monstrous crime. Now, the last of his kind, he contemplates suicide — until a violent murder and an extraordinary meeting plunge him straight back into the desperate pursuit of life — and love.

High Spirits by Robertson Davies
Robertson Davies first hit upon the notion of writing ghost stories when he joined the University of Toronto’s Massey College as a Master. Wishing to provide entertainment at the College’s Gaudy Night, the annual Christmas party, Professor Davies created a “spooky story,” which he read aloud to the gathering. That story, “Revelation from a Smoky Fire,” is the first in this wonderful, haunting collection. A tradition quickly became established and, for eighteen years, Davies delighted and amused the Gaudy Night guests with his tales of the supernatural. Here, gathered together in one volume, are those eighteen stories, just as Davies first read them.

The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova
Late one night, exploring her father’s library, a young woman finds an ancient book and a cache of yellowing letters addressed ominously to ‘My dear and unfortunate successor’. Her discovery plunges her into a world she never dreamed of – a labyrinth where the secrets of her father’s past and her mother’s mysterious fate connect to an evil hidden in the depths of history

The Stand by Stephen King
A patient escapes from a biological testing facility, unknowingly carrying a deadly weapon: a mutated strain of super-flu that will wipe out 99 percent of the world’s population within a few weeks. Those who remain are scared, bewildered, and in need of a leader. Two emerge—Mother Abagail, the benevolent 108-year-old woman who urges them to build a peaceful community in Boulder, Colorado; and Randall Flagg, the nefarious “Dark Man,” who delights in chaos and violence. As the dark man and the peaceful woman gather power, the survivors will have to choose between them—and ultimately decide the fate of all humanity.

Want more?
You can find additional Halloween reading suggestions (as well as other recommendations) from the ZSR Goodreads page!

Also, the NC Live Homegrown eBooks collection has a selection of Horror short stories that can be read online!

Happy (Halloween) Reading!

OCLC Member Forum – UNCG

Thursday, October 9, 2014 9:55 am

I recently attended the first regional OCLC member forum held at UNCG. The meeting focused on the many changes happening with OCLC products and a better understanding of how the products work together. I went to the break out session pertaining to Cataloging and Metadata. Within this session, members were able to give feedback on issues that we have been having particularly with Connexion and make request for features that don’t exist. OCLC has a web page dedicated to the forums which include pictures, questions and feedback from the attendees. Feel free to explore at the following link https://oclc.org/en-US/events/member-forums/after-party.html

Give ZSR Your Input

Sunday, October 5, 2014 3:00 pm

To plan for the future, ZSR really wants to understand your perceptions and expectations of the Library, in order to provide services you need to be successful. Please take a few moments to participate in this research study by completing a short survey about ZSR and its services. The survey should take approximately 5 minutes to complete. It will be open from October 5th through October 26th.

Your responses will be held in confidence. No identifying links between responses and respondent will be retained. Only aggregated data will be reported. Please be honest in your assessment. Participation is purely optional. Participants must be age 18 or over.

As a thank you for completing this survey, you may choose to provide your email address and be entered in a drawing for an Android Tablet. Three Android Tablets will be awarded, one each to a student, faculty and staff respondent. The email you enter for the prize drawing is in no way linked to your answers on the survey.

Begin the Survey ›

Libraries use this survey nationally and ZSR will benchmark local results against the national data. Anonymous data from ZSR will be available to the national association for publication.

If you have any difficulty accessing the survey or if you have any questions, please contact Associate Dean Susan Smith.

IRB00021718


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