Library Gazette

Author Archive

ZSR @ WFU TechXploration 2015

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 12:06 pm

Chelcie Rowell, Digital Initiatives Librarian, presents digital projects from her collaboration with students in First Year Seminars taught by Monique O'Connell and Lisa Blee.

ZSR Library was well-represented at this year’s TechXploration! This annual university event is sponsored by the Office of the Provost and showcases the use of technologies in teaching, learning, research, engagement, and creative endeavors at Wake Forest University. What follows is a collection of brief reports from ZSR Librarians about their contributions at this year’s TechXploration.

RootsMOOC: A Massive Open Online Course for Genealogy Research,
Kyle Denlinger, eLearning Librarian

I talked with quite a few people about the massive online genealogy course I’m running in collaboration with the State Library of North Carolina. People were most interested in why ZSR is doing what it’s doing with open online courses, since it isn’t readily apparent how these courses directly impact teaching and learning on campus or how ZSR benefits from offering them for free. Light bulbs went off with most of these people when I explained that ZSR is offering courses like RootsMOOC so we can experiment with new methods and tools for teaching and learning and bring what we learn back to a traditional teaching context. These courses are also excellent ways to promote the value and expertise of librarians in a way that aligns directly with the mission of libraries to inspire lifelong learning.

The Google Glassroom: Implementing Google Glass into the Library Classroom,
Amanda Foster, Instruction Librarian
This poster covered my experience teaching with a Google Glass in the library’s credit-bearing library course, LIB 100. Students gained hands on experience with Glass through daily activities like creating photo diaries, documenting scavenger hunts, producing video tutorials, and creating skits to share their personal beliefs about acceptable and unacceptable uses of Glass. Students also explored several information-related themes by having Google Glass be the focus of a semester-long research project.

LIB 100 Goes Online: Developing a Summer Online Course,
Amanda Foster, Instruction Librarian and
Kyle Denlinger, eLearning Librarian
This poster covered our ongoing experience of creating an online version of LIB 100, which will be taught in summer 2015. As a part of the development process, we re-visited and revised our learning outcomes in light of the new opportunities presented by creating an online course. The poster also discussed new tools we plan to use to assess student learning, including blogs and discussion forums. We also discussed what technologies would be needed to help facilitate online learning, including Sakai, Voicethread, and Google Drive.

Using Omeka to Foster Digital Literacy in the First Year Seminar,
Chelcie Rowell, Digital Initiatives Librarian

Monique O’Connell and I showcased two collaborative digital projects to which students contributed as part of their work for the first year seminars Nature, Environments, & Place in American Thought and The Floating City: Public Life in Venice through the Ages. The design and implementation of both of these digital projects was a collaboration between ZSR and History Department faculty. One outcome of these course digital projects was a rise in the quality of student writing when it was publicly engaged. Another outcome was students’ greater awareness of the affordances of different technologies — that a particular tool, software, or platform can either facilitate or constrain a particular scholarly or rhetorical purpose.

Flipping LIB210: An Instructional Designer, Sakai, and VoiceThread and
Chromebooks For WAB: Boots on the Ground, Software in the Cloud,
Hu Womack, Instruction & Outreach Librarian
I was fortunate to have the opportunity to present the result of two STEP Grants at TechXploration 2015. I teamed up with Thomas Dowling, our Director of Technologies at ZSR on first STEP grant that purchased eleven Lenovo Chromebooks for the students participating in the Wake Alternative Spring Break 2015 to Washington DC exploring food security. The students used the Chromebooks throughout the week-long trip to post reflections via Tumblr and to stay connected via Google Tools. For the second STEP grant, I teamed up with Instructional Designed and ITG, Sarah McCorkle to flip my LIB210 class. The process of “flipping” allowed me to lecture less and create authentic exercises in class where students could demonstrate mastery of the material! Both grants were successful and allowed me the resources required for projects I could not have accomplished on my own. I enjoyed the opportunity to tell the story of these two grants at TechXploration 2015!

5 Questions for Bobbie Collins, Social Sciences Librarian

Thursday, April 16, 2015 4:36 pm

Photo courtesy of Chelsea Tamura and LENS Summer Program.

On November 1st, 1990, Bobbie Collins set foot on the campus of Wake Forest University and began her career as the Social Sciences Reference Librarian at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library. As a Tennessee native with a background in Education, Bobbie had originally embarked on a path to pursue school librarianship, but after working at the University of Tennessee Graduate Library as a Research Assistant in the Reference Department, she decided to continue a career in academic librarianship.

After 24 years with the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and Wake Forest University, Bobbie will be retiring on April 30th. But before she flies the coop, she sat down with me to discuss her fabulous career and share her insights, memories, and lessons from a life in the Library.

We talk a lot about change in libraries, but there are some things that remain the same. From your perspective, what has changed and what has stood the test of time?

Technology has changed how we deliver some of our information. For example, researchers now have access to electronic journals and electronic databases. Probably one of the biggest changes was saying goodbye to the card catalog. The card catalog served us well for generations. It was an exciting time for libraries when the online catalog was introduced. My first experience with an online catalog was at Texas A&M University in 1982. I helped to develop an instructional program to train students and faculty on how to search the online catalog. Through the years, we have seen enhancements and improvements to the online catalog. Search functions are more sophisticated, and the user interface has definitely improved. It is interesting how people take technology for granted. There was a time when there was no email, no online resources. In April 1992, an email instruction class was offered to ZSR staff members. Email enabled us to launch our popular AskZSR email reference service, and now we can assist patrons beyond our building.

What has remained the same, I believe, is our mission and our basic service. We still collect materials (books, journals, etc.), organize them, and provide access to them in order to help the WFU community succeed.

With the exhaustive amount of information now available online, do you have any words of advice to offer patrons for finding the information they need?

I like to ask myself, “where could that be hiding?” I like to think of information as being packaged, for example, words are packaged in dictionaries, journal citations in indexes/databases, statistical/factual information in almanacs. I’m always thinking, “where would somebody put that?”. This stems from a time before electronic sources, when you had to consider who was printing that information at that time. Are you going to find it in multiple sources? This is not as true today, maybe because the web has provided people with the ability to use search engines to find that kind of factual or statistical information themselves, and they are not used to consulting specialized resources. The questions we receive today are more advanced and require further knowledge about where an item or piece of information may be stored and how can we access it.

What is your favorite library space at ZSR, and why?

I sometimes like to visit levels 7 and 8 on the Reynolds Wing, and another place I really like is Government Documents on Reynolds 4. I enjoy looking at all of the old government documents, and finding interesting items to browse. There are many little gems waiting to be discovered in those stacks. Just browsing the stacks, I have been able to find resources that I can use when responding to student research inquiries. With resources such as the Public Papers of the Presidents, students who are researching the 1960s and the moon landing can read John F. Kennedy’s “Moon Speech”.

There is no doubt you’ve helped countless patrons, and taught multitudes of students about academic research. What are some of the lessons that you’ve learned from your work at ZSR?

One thing that I love about being a reference librarian is that every day presents a new challenge. So one of my ZSR lessons is to always stay curious. There is always something new to learn, and I am hoping to remain curious– that is one thing that has sustained me throughout my whole career. When I don’t have the slightest clue as to a topic or a piece of information, (like ostrich farming in North Carolina ), I have the drive to look further.

Looking back on your career, what are some of your favorite ZSR moments?

There are so many different ones, it’s hard to narrow it down. One that definitely comes to mind is moving into the new Wilson Wing. It was so nice to have an instructional classroom (Room 476). Before the move, librarians delivered instructional sessions in the middle of the Reference Department (where Government Documents is now located). Another one would be in 2009, when I mentored Carolyn McCallum for a period of time as she developed instructional material for Information Literacy instructional sessions. Carolyn nominated me for the “Helping Hands” award, and I was honored for assisting a colleague.

Congratulations on your retirement, Bobbie! And thank you for your years of dedicated service! You will be missed!

Take the bite out of crunch time with Sources, Citations & Cookies

Sunday, March 29, 2015 5:23 pm

Every Monday in April, we will be offering our drop-in research assistance sessions–Sources, Citations & Cookies– from 2:00 – 6:00 pm. If you are working on a research paper or project, and would like a bit of help from one of our research experts at ZSR, here’s your chance! Our drop-in research assistance sessions will be held in the Mandelbaum Reading Room on:

  • Monday, April 6th from 2:00-6:00 pm
  • Monday, April 13th from 2:00-6:00 pm
  • Monday, April 20th from 2:00-6:00 pm &
  • Monday, April 27th from 2:00-6:00 pm

We will have librarians available to help with any aspect of your research project from selecting a topic, to finding resources, to setting up Zotero or citing tricky sources. Delicious spring refreshments will also be on hand to help keep everyone fueled!

There is no need to sign up for a time, but if you would like to, you can reserve an available appointment time from our online appointment calendar.

If these times don’t work, you can always use our Personal Research Session request form to schedule an appointment with a research librarian at a day and time that is convenient for you.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

The Research and Instruction Team, ZSR Library

5 Questions for Molly Keener

Monday, February 23, 2015 2:44 pm

Molly Keener, Scholarly Communication Librarian

In honor of Fair Use Week (Feb. 23rd – 27th), we have 5 Questions for our Scholarly Communication Librarian, Molly Keener. As the Scholarly Communication Librarian, Molly supports faculty and graduate students in understanding and managing copyright, new methods and models of scholarly publishing (including open access), and sharing scholarship. In her 6 years at ZSR Library, she has assisted countless faculty with thorny copyright questions, managed the Open Access Fund to support publication, and championed greater sharing of scholarship created at Wake Forest University.

What is Fair Use and why is it important for libraries and higher education?

Fair use is a provision within the Copyright Act that gives people the right to make limited uses of copyrighted content without permission from the copyright owner(s). Generally, fair use covers news reporting, commentary, satire, parody, and educational uses. For libraries, fair use is important because it is what enables us to offer services such as electronic course reserves, for our patrons to make photocopies of materials for personal use, for our colleagues digitizing content in our special collections and archives…the list goes on. In higher education, fair use is critical for generating new scholarship and expanding knowledge: articles can be shared, poetry can be read aloud, films can be shown and critiqued, and works can be excerpted and cited.

What are some of the common misconceptions about the Fair Use doctrine?

One common misconception is that fair use is hard to use. It isn’t (well, not always). In fact, I wager that everyone reading this has relied on fair use–albeit without knowing it. Ever shared a photo online that you didn’t take? Get permission? No? That’s a fair use. Ever used a direct quote in a paper (with double-quotes and attribution, of course)? That’s also a fair use.

Another common misconception is that you cannot use a work in its entirety and it still be fair. That may be true in some circumstances, but not all. There are plenty of times where using the full work is necessary for your purpose and is justifiably a fair use. For example, our family and friends sang “Happy Birthday” to my son last summer when he turned 5. “Happy Birthday” is still protected by copyright, but we all sang the song in full, without nary a concern for copyright. Why? Fair use (and fun!). We didn’t limit ourselves to only one stanza, or to n% of the song. People try to apply bright line limits to fair use, often in an attempt to establish clear yes/no boundaries, but those bright lines are difficult to establish and apply unilaterally, as each instance of fair use must be assessed independently.

When we’re presented with a copyright question at the library, we don’t immediately say, “Nope, sorry, can’t;” rather, we evaluate for fair use, assess our risk, and make informed decisions. We don’t let ourselves be unduly intimidated by copyright.

What do you enjoy most about your role at ZSR?

That I never know what question I will encounter next! I’m the only librarian in ZSR to do exactly what I do, so I am the go-to for questions relating to copyright and scholarly publishing. My work has necessitated researching French and EU copyright laws, emailing British publishers, writing letters to Congressmen in Washington, and explaining copyright basics to folks on campus. I’ve even researched copyright and trademark as it relates to the circus–twice!

When you help someone make sense of what was murky, be it related to copyright, open access, funder compliance, or publishing agreements, it’s a wonderful feeling. Witnessing their “Aha!” moment is rewarding.

What areas of your personality strengthen the work that you do?

I am details-oriented, and love an intellectual challenge. I also am not afraid to call a spade a spade, so I am direct in my assessment. That said, I’m also willing to acknowledge when I don’t know enough and will seek guidance from my peers at other institutions.

What has been the biggest influence on your work?

Chance. For many years, my sights were set on law school, until I landed my first library job working in Circulation for my father’s freshman year roommate when I was a sophomore at my parents’ alma mater (that lovely light blue school down the road a ways…shh…). I then decided to become a librarian, with aims to work at a small, private liberal arts college, probably in reference. But a chance conversation with my grad school advisor led to a summer internship at Wake Forest’s medical school library, the Coy C. Carpenter Library, where a year later I landed my first professional position. When I started at Carpenter, I’d never heard of scholarly communication, but was asked within my first month on the job to revamp their program. I have many, many more examples of how chance–chance encounters, chance conversations, chances to say yes–has influenced my career and work. Much like not knowing what questions I’ll encounter, I never know when I’ll have my next chance…but I’ll likely take it!

 

5 Questions for Le’Ron Byrd

Friday, January 30, 2015 9:37 am

Le'Ron Byrd talks with Maggie Perez Vincente ('15)

Welcome to our 5 Questions series! These mini-interviews introduce our dedicated staff and faculty, and share behind-the-scenes stories about the work that we love to do! In this installment, we caught up with the ZSR Library Fellow, Le’Ron Byrd (’14). As the ZSR Library Fellow, Le’Ron has worked with the ZSR Library Administrative Team in a year-long position as a full-time staff member of the university.

Le’Ron, you also worked with ZSR as a student assistant during your undergraduate experience. How has your view of ZSR changed from working here as a student assistant to your current experience as the ZSR Fellow?

I worked as a student assistant in Access Services throughout my undergraduate career and I thoroughly enjoyed interacting with people who approached the main desk. As a student assistant, I had the unique opportunity of getting to know not only my immediate supervisors but some of the library staff. They truly are amazing people and are enthusiastic about their jobs on a daily basis. What changed once I became the Fellow was my overall perception of the staff and faculty here at ZSR. I learned that that each individual here in the library (even those who work behind the scenes) are committed to working hard towards bringing ZSR’s mission– to help students, staff, and faculty succeed– to life. It is honestly something that amazes me every day I come into work.

As the ZSR Fellow, you have a hand in work that goes on behind the scenes and in the public eye . . . What have been some of your favorite contributions?

It’s hard to identify a particular favorite project because it’s not about the actual project to me, it’s about having the opportunity to collaborate with others. I mean, let’s be real… ZSR is home to the best staff and faculty here at Wake Forest. Everyone in this building is excited at every opportunity to show why ZSR is the heart of our campus. It shows during Wake the Library– which would be my favorite “project” if I had to choose.

What’s next, and what’s your best advice for the next ZSR Fellow?

Next is continuing to work in academia. I was so sure I wanted to go right into law school next year but being a Wake Forest Fellow has taught me that I still have a lot more to learn about myself before embarking on my career. Thus, the best advice I have for the next ZSR Fellow would be to come into this position open-minded about yourself. Do your best to not visualize your time as the ZSR fellow as a means to an end. You can discover so many opportunities during your tenure as the fellow.

Has your opinion of libraries or librarians changed? How so?

Oh absolutely! I now know how complex libraries are and how far along ZSR is, as it relates to other academic libraries. In particular, I’ve learned how many different departments exist inside of libraries and how they all function together to make the institution work. I mean… working at a library has defeated my preconceived stereotypes of librarians too. ZSR librarians are so much more than people who shelve the books and are louder than most people imagine! They’re actually quite humorous.

What are some of your favorite ZSR memories?

(smiles) As a student during Finals Week watching the sun rise in the Atrium, after pulling an all-nighter. Although pulling the all-nighter was quite terrible, watching the sun rise in the Atrium made the painful experience a little better. My second favorite memory happened as the ZSR Fellow in November. I helped bring ZSR to China alongside the Wake Forest Advantage Program. While in China, all I could think about was my first day working in ZSR as a student assistant in 2010. I just never thought I would have gone from being a student assistant in ZSR to an advocate for ZSR in different countries.

 

The Office of the President is currently accepting applications for the 2015-2016 Z. Smith Reynolds Library Fellow. For more information, or to apply, visit Wake Forest Fellows Program. Applications are due by February 6th.

That’s a Wrap! Fall 2014 Sources, Citations & Cocoa

Sunday, December 7, 2014 6:00 pm

Cookies & candy & citation guides-- oh my!

Last Monday, ZSR held the last drop-in research session of our Sources, Citations & Cocoa series. This semester’s series started fast and furious, with twenty students stopping by within the first hour of the first session on November 10th. The following three sessions were also well attended, and overall, we had 90 students participate in Sources, Citations & Cocoa program this semester (compared to 35 last Spring, and 47 last Fall). We are excited to see these numbers grow, and are looking forward to offering more drop-in sessions in the Spring.

A follow-up survey was sent to participants to gather additional information about their experience with the drop-in session, and collect suggestions for future drop-in sessions. Based on the survey responses received:

  • 53% of responding participants “strongly agreed” that the help they received in the session made their research paper or project better (an additional 40% agreed with this statement).
  • 60% of participants who responded to the survey received assistance with citations during their drop-in session.
  • 67% of respondents are “very willing” to attend other ZSR-sponsored events, based on their experience at the drop-in session.
  • 87% of respondents were “very satisfied” with the overall experience of their drop-in session.
  • 100% of participants who responded to the survey agreed that they were “very willing” to recommend drop-in research sessions to a friend or classmate.

A special thanks to all the ZSR librarians, staff, and student assistants that assisted with, and helped to promote, this event! I look forward to offering these drop-in sessions again next semester.

#myzsr Guide to Finals Week: Finding Your Happy Place

Sunday, November 23, 2014 9:05 pm

ZSR and the The Writing Center are teaming up to bring you the #myzsr Guide to Finals Week– a weekly series of valuable advice, tried-and-true strategies, and insider information to help you survive THRIVE during exam week! This week’s installment . . .

Finding Your Happy Place

You don’t have to be a New York City real estate mogul to understand the key concept in property valuation– it’s all about location, location, location! Just ask any seasoned WFU student about their study habits & they are likely to provide a list of reliable campus locations that provide the ideal setting for an effective study spot. Location is key. And not just any location, but one that matches the desired characteristics for a comfortable & efficient study space. If you are still searching for your perfect study space, check out our list of recommended spaces in ZSR, on WFU campus, & beyond!


ZSR Spaces:

For Absolute Silence

The 6th, 7th, & 8th Floors of ZSR are designated Quiet Zones
The 24 Hour Study Room (across from Starbucks)
The Basement floors on both Reynolds & Wilson wings
The Ammons Gallery / Red Room (Room 401)

Hidden Gems

The ZSR Special Collections Reading Room
Balcony Nooks on Wilson 4 & 6
Video Conferencing Room / ZSR Room 204: Located on the hallway that runs behind the Circulation Desk on Level 2 of the Reynolds wing (ask for directions at any service desk). The room seats 38 and provides access to ample power outlets.
Study carrels and tables on Wilson 6

For Group Study

Book a Study Room
Tables in the Atrium & on the 4th floor of the Reynolds Wing (GovDocs area)
Room 476 (Wilson 4)
Starbucks

Soon the Writing Center will be posting information on their Facebook page about how you can win study time in the Writing Center classroom during finals week. Like our page and check back soon!

Elsewhere on Campus:

Campus Grounds
Zick’s
Reynolda Hall
Benson study rooms & public areas
Tribble
Kirby & Manchester
Business Information Commons at Farrell Hall
North Campus Dining Hall
The Green Room in Reynolda
Subway

Venturing Beyond Campus:

Twin City Hive
Camino Bakery
Krankies
Ardmore Coffee
Panera

 

More Advice for Setting Up Your Study Space:
(for students, by students!)

“The most essential part is that if you’ve allocated a certain time to study, use it to study. That means do whatever it takes, but don’t end up on that same old social media haunt or trawling the internet instead of doing the work that needs to be done.”
– Matt Avara (’17)

“If you don’t have a space reserved it’s helpful to have a short list of spots in your head for when you are looking for a place to study in ZSR. Find some areas that are suitable for your type of studying (dead silence for some, a little activity for others). Most importantly in choosing a spot in ZSR is finding a place with outlets. The majority of areas around here have plenty, but there is nothing worse than working for an hour then having to move because your computer is about to die.”
– Evan Altizer (’17)

“After having worked in the Special Collections archives this past summer (6th floor of ZSR), I would recommend that students visit and take a look at some of the rare book collections/displays, as most people seem unaware that Special Collections even exists. The main room looks like a scene straight from Harry Potter, and students are welcome to study there when researchers aren’t using it!”
– Kristin Weisse (Graduate Student, English Department)

Share your expertise!
Let us know what you look for in your ideal study space, or provide a recommendation! Add your comments below, or share with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram.
Don’t forget to add #myzsr!

#myzsr Guide to Finals Week: 5 Research Hacks to Know

Monday, November 10, 2014 8:28 am

ZSR and the The Writing Center are teaming up to bring you the #myzsr Guide to Finals Week– a weekly series of valuable advice, tried-and-true strategies, and insider information to help you survive THRIVE during exam week! Week One: 5 Research Hacks to Know.

They’re coming. Getting closer. You can feel it in the air, and see it on the faces of everyone around you … DUE DATES! Luckily, ZSR has some research tricks that can help you save time, reduce stress, and maintain your balance, as assignments start to stockpile. So, without further delay…

5 Research Hacks to Know:

 

1) Get started with a Research Guide!

ZSR Librarians have created comprehensive online Research Guides to help you get started with any research assignment. We offer Research Guides in every academic discipline, and guides for research-related tools (such as our Citation guides and Zotero guide). The guides offer recommendations for relevant databases, journals, and other information resources– all librarian-approved. A great starting point for all assignments!

2) Database Search Tricks

Boolean Operators
Use AND, OR, NOT to combine your search terms, so the database understands what you are looking for. Using AND indicates that all words must be found in the results (ex. violence AND media AND children), using OR indicates that at least one of the terms provided must be found in the results (ex. sea OR ocean OR marine), and NOT excludes results containing a particular term (ex. bears NOT Grizzly).

Truncation
Use the root part of a word with an asterisk, which will provide search results that include all forms of the root word used (ex. chin* will retrieve China, Chinese . . . religio* will retrieve religion, religions, religious, etc.)

Phrase Searching
Use quotation marks around keyword phrases to indicate that these words be searched as a phrase, in the exact order you type them. Ex. “global warming” OR “stand your ground law” will provide results with both of these exact phrases.

3) Citation Aids

One word– Zotero.
This incredible Citation Manager is free, easy to use, and ZSR offers instruction on how to get started with this software.

Our search interfaces also provide citation assistance through various “cite” functions. You can cite search results from the homepage search by hovering over the item, and selecting “CITE” from the right column.

You can also cite items directly from their record in our catalog. From the item record, select the “* Cite this” option above the featured item. For more help with using these Citation Aids, please Ask ZSR.

**KEEP IN MIND**: With all automatic citation generators, you still need to check these citations to make sure that they conform to their appropriate style guidelines. They give you a starting point, but they may have errors.

4) Target your search results with Filters

Use the filters in the search results page to refine and get more targeted results. You can filter by:

  • Full text online
  • Scholarly/peer-reviewed
  • content type (books, journal articles, magazine articles, etc.)
  • publication date
  • language
  • discipline
  • And much more!

5) Drop in for Research Assistance (and Cocoa)!

Our *cozy* drop-in Research Assistance Sessions– Sources, Citations & Cocoa– are offered during the end of the semester. ZSR Librarians are on hand to provide assistance for students at any stage of their research process– narrowing a research topic, finding scholarly articles and supporting research, and building citations. Oh! And we offer a veritable buffet of delicious treats and beverages to boot! This semester, we are offering Sources, Citations, & Cocoa sessions on:

Mondays from 3:30pm-7:30pm,
starting November 10th and running through December 1st.

Of course, if you can’t make it to any of these sessions, you can always schedule time to meet with a librarian for a Personal Research Session.

Alright! Now that you know how to hack it, hit those books! :)

Book-tacular Fun at Project Pumpkin with the ZSR Ambassadors!

Sunday, November 9, 2014 2:08 pm

ZSR Ambassador and Student Assistant, Megan Franks, reports on the Z. Smith Reynolds Library’s recent participation with Project Pumpkin!

On October 29th, the ZSR Library participated in a longstanding Wake Forest tradition, Project Pumpkin, for the first time. Project Pumpkin is a frighteningly fun time on the Upper Quad of the Wake Forest campus. Children from the Winston-Salem community are invited to go trick-or-treating at dozens of booths set up by student organizations and campus departments. Besides the pure joy of candy, there are also activities and games at each booth for the children to participate in. This year, over 900 children were brought to Wake Forest to participate! Of course, ZSR had to get in on the fun.

bookmarks, stickers, and markers for Hallo-Read activity.

Hallo-Read book marks are ready for young readers to decorate with spooky stickers and art supplies.

ZSR staff members collaborated with members of the ZSR Ambassadors group on a Project Pumpkin booth. The Ambassadors are a group of students who plan fun events year-round in the library and promote the library’s services to the wider community. The staff members and the Ambassadors decided on a book-tacular “Hallo-Read!” theme. The ZSR booth was scattered with stickers and markers so the children could make their own bookmarks. There was also a handful of spooky Halloween books from the Education library on hand, in case anyone wanted a quick scare!

The President of the Ambassadors, Heidi Gall, and the Vice President, Madison Cairo, expressed their excitement in having a chance to serve the Winston-Salem community and also in getting more involved with the Wake Forest community of organizations. The volunteers at the booth throughout the day were all smiles as the kids approached in their cute costumes. The bookmarks were a hit – the kids loved being able to create something of their own to use in their books at home! And of course, the handfuls of candy weren’t a bad deal either.

All in all, everyone had a blast on this windy Fall day, celebrating the holiday and the community. The Ambassadors look forward to participating in more campus traditions, as well as giving back to the campus itself – with Wake the Library! Every year, the Ambassadors collaborate with ZSR staff to bring fun and food to the students studying hard for their final exams in the library. This year promises to be a great, grand time. And fear not, for there will be candy galore at this event as well!

Megan Franks is a senior from Kernersville, North Carolina. She is a psychology major. She works at the circulation desk and absolutely loves the library, and loves having the opportunity to flourish!

Sources, Citations & Cocoa

Sunday, October 26, 2014 8:01 pm

Starting November 10th, we will be offering our drop-in research assistance sessions– Sources, Citations & Cocoa! If you are working on a research paper or project, and would like a bit of help from one of our research experts at ZSR, here’s your chance! Our drop-in research assistance sessions will be held in ZSR Room 476 on:

  • Monday, November 10th from 3:30-7:30pm
  • Monday, November 17th from 3:30-7:30pm
  • Monday, November 24th from 3:30-7:30pm &
  • Monday, December 1st from 3:30-7:30pm

We will have librarians available to help with any aspect of your research project from selecting a topic, to finding resources, to setting up Zotero or citing tricky sources. Delicious winter bevvies and snacks will also be on hand to help keep you fueled!

There is no need to sign up for a time, but if you would like to, you can reserve an available time in our appointment calendar.

If these times don’t work, you can always use our Personal Research Session request form to schedule an appointment with a research librarian at a day and time that is convenient for you.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

The Research and Instruction Team, ZSR Library


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