Library Gazette

Carolyn, Bobbie, and Sakai

Thursday, August 26, 2010 10:10 am

The first day of class is an exciting time for both students and instructors. From an instructors’ perspective, the first day can also be very challenging. Although an instructor may have carefully planned and organized the day’s activities, there is always the fear that a technological glitch or a significant bug in a new system will occur during the class period. To counter these negative thoughts, it is best to keep a positive attitude and have a back-up plan in case the technology fails.

On Wednesday, August 25, Carolyn and I introduced our LIB 210 students to Sakai. During the summer, Carolyn and I attended several training sessions on Sakai. As part of our training, we learned how to create announcements, add assignments, and set up a gradebook. In setting up our Sakai course, we were surprised about how quickly we mastered some of the nuances and features of the new system. Although we relied on print handouts from the training sessions and the online “help” feature in Sakai, a lot of our newly gained knowledge came from the old trial-and-error approach to problem solving. We quickly realized that mistakes could easily be changed or removed from the system.

As part of our planning strategy for the course, Carolyn and I decided to give Sakai a trial run on the first day of class. We designed an assignment for students to complete during class and submit via Sakai. The assignment was a form for students to rank their preferences for their social science discipline presentation. After showing students the assignment in Sakai and passing out a print copy of a handout developed by Joy Gambill on “Submitting Assignments in Sakai,” our students quickly submitted their assignment. After refreshing the page in Sakai, Carolyn was able to see all of the students’ submissions. Both Carolyn and I breathed a collective sigh of relief. Just to be on the safe side at the beginning of class, Carolyn asked students to complete the form on paper. Knowing what we know now, we could have eliminated this step since all of our students were enrolled in Sakai.

With the first day behind us and our success with Sakai, Carolyn and I are looking forward to teaching the LIB 210 class. We would also like to mention that our comfort level in using Sakai was greatly enhanced by the technical expertise of our colleagues: Susan Smith and Giz Womack. We appreciate their willingness to share their knowledge with us and provide guidance when we were stumped.

One Response to “Carolyn, Bobbie, and Sakai”

  1. Bobbie, thanks for sharing your Sakai success story. It’s good to know that it is meeting your instruction needs and that it worked as planned!


Pages
About
Categories
Archives
Awards
Events
General
Instruction
Outreach
Staff
Technology
Tags
Archives
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
May 2006
April 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
October 2005
August 2005
July 2005

Powered by WordPress.org, protected by Akismet. Blog with WordPress.com.