Library Gazette

During January 2010...

LSTA Grant “Preserving Forsyth’s Past” Progress Report

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 12:09 pm

As many of you know, the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and the Forsyth County Public library are collaborating on an LSTA grant called “Preserving Forsyth’s Past”. This grant reaches out to small Forsyth County organizations to educate them about how to organize and preserve their organizations’ cultural heritage materials. As part of the grant, four public digitization centers have been established as a new library service in the public library system (and as an enhancement to our services at the ZSR Library). The four digitization stations are located at the Central Library, the ZSR Library, and at the Walkertown and Lewisville branches. The centers are equipped with equipment, software and trained staff that can provide people with a practical solution to preserving important local history.

We are mid-way through the grant, having purchased and installed the equipment and help pilot workshops for small groups at the ZSR Library and Central Library. On February 20th there will be a series of workshops at the Lewisville branch on “Preserving and Digitizing Your Records”. These programs will be repeated on Saturday, April 17th at the Walkertown branch and on Saturday June 26th at the Central Library.

On Wednesday, January 27th, I went with Barry Davis, Craig Fansler and Audra Eagle to the Lewisville branch Library to prepare for the February 20th program. If you have not seen this branch library, it is worth the short drive on 241 to Lewisville. The auditorium is going to be perfect for our lecture and hands-on programs.

If you are interested in more information please visit: http://northcarolinaroom.wordpress.com/services/digitization-center/

-Giz Womack

The Bridge: Technology Services at the Heart of Campus

Monday, January 25, 2010 1:11 pm

The Information Systems service desk opened recently in The Bridge at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library. The Bridge combines the information technology services of the ZSR Library with the IS Help Desk to create a central place for assistance with a variety of technologies. Services include ThinkPad support, instructional technology support, videography, multimedia services, and assistance with University standard load software.

The combined service desk is housed in a newly-renovated space near the Atrium in the former Information Technology Center. The Bridge features the service desk, a multimedia lab and the recently redesigned ministudio. Full-time IT professionals staff The Bridge from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additionally, trained student assistants are available from 5 p.m.-1 a.m., Monday through Thursday; 5 p.m.-7 p.m., Fridays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Saturdays; and 10 a.m.-1 a.m., Sundays.

Teaching with Technology

Monday, January 25, 2010 1:10 pm

Google applications are becoming more common on campus, and the ZSR Library offers a variety of workshops on using Google tools for both collaborating and streamlining research. Learn how to make your research come to you with Google Reader, how Google Docs can facilitate collaboration and how to use Google Sites to build a Web site within minutes instead of hours! Register online for these and other upcoming faculty classes.

Spring Library Lecture Series

Monday, January 25, 2010 1:09 pm

African-American Art of the 20th & 21st Centuries
Wednesday, January 27, Room 204, 3 p.m.
As an early kick-off to Black History Month, Dianne Caesar, Executive Director of Winston-Salem’s Delta Arts Center, will speak on African-American art and artists of the 20th and 21st centuries with special emphasis on the New Negro Movement.

The Metaethics of Gay Liberation
Tuesday, March 2, Room 204, 3 p.m.
Shannon Gilreath, Wake Forest Fellow for the Interdisciplinary Study of Law, will discuss the principal points of the legal and political philosophy he sketches for the gay liberation movement in the 21st century in his forthcoming book: Gay Lives/Straight Laws: An Unapologetic Appraisal of Life “Under” the Law. Many of his arguments are controversial within the mainstream gay movement, including his stance against gay pornography and his criticism of the emergent centrality of transgender issues in the gay rights movement.

Women in Science at Wake Forest University
Monday, March 29, Allen Mandelbaum Reading Room, 4 p.m.
In recognition of Women’s History Month, scientists from the Biology, Chemistry and Physics departments will share their personal reflections on the important role women have played in science, their personal career and research experiences, and their vision for the future for women scientists. Speakers include: Associate Professor of Chemistry Rebecca Alexander, Professor of Physics Natalie Holzwarth, Professor of Biology Gloria Muday, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Jacquelyn Fetrow.

From Classroom to Controversy: Academic Freedom and the Study of Religion
Wednesday, April 7, Room 204, 3 p.m.
Assistant Professor of Religion Lynn Neal will explore the following questions in her April lecture: What happens when a class assignment becomes a source of controversy? How does one respond? What does one learn? By examining an assignment on religion and representation in light of the conflict that it created, this talk offers some insights into these questions. For teacher-scholars, this classroom controversy raises important issues about academic freedom, studying religion, and the politics of being a professor.

Earth Day Celebration Program
Thursday, April 22, Room 204, time and details TBA

Please visit the Library Lecture Series Web site or contact Carolyn McCallum or Heather Gillette for more information.

Making E-Journals Last Forever

Monday, January 25, 2010 1:08 pm

Every year, libraries convert more and more journal subscriptions to electronic-only format. In some quarters, each conversion gives rise to nagging worry — will future scholars have access to today’s key articles?

The WFU Libraries are taking several measures to ensure that our e-journal articles will last forever. First, our contracts with publishers stipulate that they will provide perpetual access to the purchased content. Secondly, the libraries are participating in three different initiatives to preserve backup copies of our electronic titles: LOCKSS, CLOCKSS, and Portico.

All three services share some common features. They operate at disparate geographic locations and independently of publishers. They all have plans in place for format migration, should the ubiquitous PDF be eclipsed. All three are “dark archives,” whose content will not be released to library users unless a trigger event occurs. All three share similar definitions of what counts as a trigger event. For instance:

  • A publisher goes out of business,
  • A publisher decides not to host a particular title anymore, or
  • A natural or technological catastrophe prevents the publisher from supplying the content.

The differences in the three services are subtle. As you may infer from the similar names, LOCKSS and CLOCKSS are similar in their approach. With LOCKSS, each library maintains a backup copy of their journals on a server, and each copy is checked against the copies at other sites to guard against data corruption. For CLOCKSS, libraries contribute financially to support the servers maintained at library locations worldwide. Some publishers work with Portico and not LOCKSS, or vice versa.

Like CLOCKSS, Portico is a hosted solution, but Portico receives a lot of financial support from foundations, in addition to the support it receives from libraries and publishers. Portico can also provide post-cancellation access. For instance if the library cancels an electronic-only subscription in 2012, then the library and the publisher can agree to use Portico to access the subscribed years instead of using the publisher’s own site.

Since the advent of e-only, no publishers have failed and no service interruptions have been caused by disasters. However, in several instances a publisher has abandoned a single title. You can find these CLOCKSS/LOCKSS/Portico titles via the journals page or online catalog just like any other title. Look for Graft to see an example.

Taken together, these multiple archival initiatives will guarantee that libraries will continue to provide scholars with crucial journal content for generations to come.

Database News

Monday, January 25, 2010 1:07 pm

African American Newspapers (1827-1998)

This searchable database links users to page images of original newspaper articles. When completed later this year, the collection will include 270 newspapers from 36 states. Purchase of African American Newspapers is supported by the Presidential Trust for Faculty Excellence.

Ebook Library

The ZSR Library has begun a new partnership with electronic book vendor Ebook Library (EBL). Books that the library purchases from EBL may be viewed online, or they can be downloaded for a limited time for offline reading. When viewing an EBL e-book online, users can print or copy a discrete portion of the text. You can also add online notes, which remain accessible whenever you view the book online. EBL books are listed in the online catalog. If you would like to test-drive an EBL e-book, try Ordered Porous Solids. Contact your library liaison to purchase an EBL book for the collection.

New electronic reference books

ZSR recently purchased two new online reference resources, the International Encyclopedia of Communication, and the Encyclopedia of Human Rights. You can find them on the databases page, or by searching the library catalog.

Databases on the move

Three CCH databases—Business Research Network, Human Resources Research Network and Tax Research Network—have merged to form CCH IntelliConnect. Please update your bookmarks.

Cancellations

The following databases have been canceled:

  • ARTFL (American and French Research on the Treasury of the French Language)
  • Biography and Genealogy Master Index
  • CogNet
  • Research Insight on the Web

New Database: LexisNexis Statistical DataSets

Monday, January 25, 2010 1:06 pm

LexisNexis Statistical DataSets is a module within the LexisNexis Statistical database that provides the searcher with powerful tools to access and export long data sets. Included sources range from agencies of the Federal government to foreign stock exchanges.

Data is presented in both tabular and graphical form, and its presentation can easily be modified and expanded. In addition, one can select multiple data points by holding down the CTRL key and then clicking on the name of the elements one wishes to compare. The new data will appear in both the data table and the graph.

Here’s an example of the output for a search of the unemployment rate for the United States and North Carolina:

Accessing the DataSets

From the ZSR Database page, click on “L” in the “Browse by Title” area, then select LexisNexis Statistical from the list of databases shown. Once LN Statistical opens, select “Customize Data – - Create a Table” in the left-hand menu bar. It will look like this:

Finding Data

Once the DataSets section is open, one has the option to locate data by searching or browsing. If one enters a term in the search box located in the upper right-hand corner, a separate window will open with a list of sources that include the search term. Links are provided within the list, and clicking on a link will take the searcher directly to the particular data.

The searcher has several options for browsing: In the News; Key Economic Indicators; by Subject; or by Source. In the left-hand column, one will see a list of subjects; click on the plus sign next to a subject to see its sub-segments. Keep expanding a subject tree until one sees a list of sub-segments in blue font with icons that look like pieces of paper with lines on them. The folder icon indicates a further level of segmentation is available; the paper icon indicates access to data. Click on a name. One will see the data table and associated graph.

One can also browse by source. While many of the sources originate in the Federal Government, others, such as The China Data Center, London Bullion Market Association, Dave Leip’s Political Atlas and the World Bank, are also available. Click on the source name and drill down to the level at which data is presented.

Modifying Data

DataSets provides several tools for modifying the data once the table and chart has been opened. Above the chart will be additional details such as the years of coverage, which one can modify by clicking on those one wishes to delete from the data presented. Sometimes, one has the option of switching from annual to monthly or quarterly data here. Also, above the graph will be a list of further sub-segments; these vary by subject. So, if one has opened the chart for U.S. unemployment, one can click on ‘state’ and, while holding down the CTRL key, select a state or states to compare to the national rate.

One may also modify the dates of coverage by placing the cursor on the graph at the point one wishes to begin or end the data, clicking and dragging the cursor to the opposite end of the date range one wishes to examine. The expanded chart will appear immediately.

One may also modify the presentation of the data. Above the chart, there are 3 icons: trend, map and ranking. Returning to the unemployment example, once ‘state’ has been selected, one may toggle among trend, map and ranking to examine the data in each mode. Map and ranking are only available when one has selected data that can be presented thus.

Exporting Data

Data can be exported in a variety of formats such as Excel, SAS®, CSV and PDF. Exported data can be modified or saved. In addition, you can also print the results.

LexisNexis DataSets is a powerful addition to the collection. If you have questions about how to use it please contact the Reference Desk or your subject specialist.
Access to LexisNexis DataSets is provided by the Professional Center Library.

The Bridge: Technology Services at the Heart of Campus

Monday, January 25, 2010 8:56 am

The Information Systems service desk opened recently in The Bridge at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library. The Bridge combines the information technology services of the ZSR Library with the IS Help Desk to create a central place for assistance with a variety of technologies. Services include ThinkPad support, instructional technology support, videography, multimedia services, and assistance with University standard load software.

The combined service desk is housed in a newly-renovated space near the Atrium in the former Information Technology Center. The Bridge features the service desk, a multimedia lab and the recently redesigned ministudio. Full-time IT professionals staff The Bridge from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additionally, trained student assistants are available from 5 p.m.-1 a.m., Monday through Thursday; 5 p.m.-7 p.m., Fridays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Saturdays; and 10 a.m.-1 a.m., Sundays.

Remote Storage Building visit

Friday, January 22, 2010 3:51 pm

RSB entrance

RSB interior

On Thursday morning, Lynn, Lauren, MaryBeth, Carol, Scott and Craig visited the building being readied for our off site storage facility. It is located very near Ernie Shore Field in a previously use Reynolds Tobacco Co. building. The exterior is a non-descript, off-white metal monstrosity. Inside, there are numerous large cavernous spaces which will house our storage. The plan is to build a building inside a building with separate HVAC system and roof, etc. This building-in-a-building will house some very tall shelving units that Scott will attack with a special vehicle to retrieve materials for our patrons. Stay tuned for further developments.

Information Sec_rity is not complete without U!

Wednesday, January 20, 2010 5:17 pm

Travis, Kristen and I went over to the IS offices in the UCC to attend the Information Security session offered by IS today. The program was a basic session on how to ensure that your data, (and the University’s data) remains secure. Sarah Wojic (from IS) led the presentation, and Mike Rollins, (also from IS) was in attendance.

The acronym CIA was used to present the three major principles of Information Security. They are:
–Confidentiality: preventing disclosure to unauthorized users
–Integrity: preventing the misuse of important data files
–Availability: still making the data available to everyone that has a legitimate need.
Mike suggested that while some may say that an unplugged computer is the safest computer, it doesn’t allow for accessing any data, so it doesn’t meet the third principle of Information Security. Information Security is interested in maximizing and balancing all three.

There was discussion about the ways we can ensure the physical security of our computers including:
–locking computer with a cable lock even in your office. (I was reminded to do this and did so upon returning to my office.)
–never leave your laptop unattended. (More on this later)
–when you take your laptop home with you, carry it discretely in a bag that doesn’t shout out “my laptop with lots of data is in here!”
–put it in the trunk if you aren’t going straight home.

Ways to secure data include:
–not letting others, (including your kids or spouse) use your laptop. The laptop is for your use only.
–don’t post passwords on, in, or near your computer and change passwords often
–lock your desktop before leaving your computer, even if you’ll just be gone a minute.
–save sensitive data to a network drive.
–use the VPN client when off campus
–don’t print anything unless absolutely necessary, and then afterward, shred it.
–don’t respond to any phishing emails, but do report them to infosec@wfu.edu
–only open attachments that you are expecting or that are from people you know.

To illustrate the points, she utilized some entertaining video clips showing Wake Forest people acting at their worst and then at their best. During the Q and A at the end, Travis asked if students were given this same level of training before they get their laptops. No one in the room knew for sure, except that they are expected to sign the University Ethical Use policy, (which deals more with not violating copyright, not downloading illegal software and such.) Travis then related the experience we see in the library with students frequently leaving their laptops unattended, perhaps because they feel so comfortable here. Sarah was quite shocked, and Mike said that when they pick up their laptops, it is suggested to them that they use cable locks but that cable locks are not issued as a part of the laptop. No real result came of that, but hopefully it reminded those in IS that the message on information security needs to extend beyond the faculty and staff of the institution to include the students.


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