Library Gazette

5 Questions for Molly Keener

Monday, February 23, 2015 2:44 pm

Molly Keener, Scholarly Communication Librarian

In honor of Fair Use Week (Feb. 23rd – 27th), we have 5 Questions for our Scholarly Communication Librarian, Molly Keener. As the Scholarly Communication Librarian, Molly supports faculty and graduate students in understanding and managing copyright, new methods and models of scholarly publishing (including open access), and sharing scholarship. In her 6 years at ZSR Library, she has assisted countless faculty with thorny copyright questions, managed the Open Access Fund to support publication, and championed greater sharing of scholarship created at Wake Forest University.

What is Fair Use and why is it important for libraries and higher education?

Fair use is a provision within the Copyright Act that gives people the right to make limited uses of copyrighted content without permission from the copyright owner(s). Generally, fair use covers news reporting, commentary, satire, parody, and educational uses. For libraries, fair use is important because it is what enables us to offer services such as electronic course reserves, for our patrons to make photocopies of materials for personal use, for our colleagues digitizing content in our special collections and archives…the list goes on. In higher education, fair use is critical for generating new scholarship and expanding knowledge: articles can be shared, poetry can be read aloud, films can be shown and critiqued, and works can be excerpted and cited.

What are some of the common misconceptions about the Fair Use doctrine?

One common misconception is that fair use is hard to use. It isn’t (well, not always). In fact, I wager that everyone reading this has relied on fair use–albeit without knowing it. Ever shared a photo online that you didn’t take? Get permission? No? That’s a fair use. Ever used a direct quote in a paper (with double-quotes and attribution, of course)? That’s also a fair use.

Another common misconception is that you cannot use a work in its entirety and it still be fair. That may be true in some circumstances, but not all. There are plenty of times where using the full work is necessary for your purpose and is justifiably a fair use. For example, our family and friends sang “Happy Birthday” to my son last summer when he turned 5. “Happy Birthday” is still protected by copyright, but we all sang the song in full, without nary a concern for copyright. Why? Fair use (and fun!). We didn’t limit ourselves to only one stanza, or to n% of the song. People try to apply bright line limits to fair use, often in an attempt to establish clear yes/no boundaries, but those bright lines are difficult to establish and apply unilaterally, as each instance of fair use must be assessed independently.

When we’re presented with a copyright question at the library, we don’t immediately say, “Nope, sorry, can’t;” rather, we evaluate for fair use, assess our risk, and make informed decisions. We don’t let ourselves be unduly intimidated by copyright.

What do you enjoy most about your role at ZSR?

That I never know what question I will encounter next! I’m the only librarian in ZSR to do exactly what I do, so I am the go-to for questions relating to copyright and scholarly publishing. My work has necessitated researching French and EU copyright laws, emailing British publishers, writing letters to Congressmen in Washington, and explaining copyright basics to folks on campus. I’ve even researched copyright and trademark as it relates to the circus–twice!

When you help someone make sense of what was murky, be it related to copyright, open access, funder compliance, or publishing agreements, it’s a wonderful feeling. Witnessing their “Aha!” moment is rewarding.

What areas of your personality strengthen the work that you do?

I am details-oriented, and love an intellectual challenge. I also am not afraid to call a spade a spade, so I am direct in my assessment. That said, I’m also willing to acknowledge when I don’t know enough and will seek guidance from my peers at other institutions.

What has been the biggest influence on your work?

Chance. For many years, my sights were set on law school, until I landed my first library job working in Circulation for my father’s freshman year roommate when I was a sophomore at my parents’ alma mater (that lovely light blue school down the road a ways…shh…). I then decided to become a librarian, with aims to work at a small, private liberal arts college, probably in reference. But a chance conversation with my grad school advisor led to a summer internship at Wake Forest’s medical school library, the Coy C. Carpenter Library, where a year later I landed my first professional position. When I started at Carpenter, I’d never heard of scholarly communication, but was asked within my first month on the job to revamp their program. I have many, many more examples of how chance–chance encounters, chance conversations, chances to say yes–has influenced my career and work. Much like not knowing what questions I’ll encounter, I never know when I’ll have my next chance…but I’ll likely take it!

 

ZSR and the 2015 Oscars!

Monday, February 9, 2015 4:38 pm

The 87th Academy Awards ceremony will be telecast on Sunday, February 22, and several of the nominated films are in ZSR’s Media Collection! Here’s a list of those films that are currently available as well as the categories in which they received a nomination.

Boyhood – DVD 13162

  • Best Picture- Richard Linklater, Cathleen Sutherland
  • Best Director- Richard Linklater
  • Best Supporting Actor- Ethan Hawke
  • Best Supporting Actress- Patricia Arquette
  • Best Original Screenplay- Richard Linklater
  • Best Film Editing- Sandra Adair

The Boxtrolls – DVD 13214

  • Best Animated Feature Film

Captain America. The Winter Soldier – DVD 12849

  • Best Visual Effects- Dan Deleeuw, Russell Earl, Bryan Grill, Daniel Sudick

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes – DVD 13125

  • Best Visual Effects- Joe Letteri, Dan Lemmon, Daniel Barrett, Erik Winquist

Finding Vivian Maier – DVD 12771

  • Best Documentary Feature- John Maloof, Charlie Siskel

Gone Girl – DVD 13183

  • Best Actress- Rosamund Pike

The Grand Budapest Hotel – DVD 12727

  • Best Picture- Wes Anderson, Scott Rudin, Steven M. Rales, Jeremy Dawson
  • Best Director- Wes Anderson
  • Best Original Screenplay- Wes Anderson, Hugo Guinness
  • Best Original Music Score- Alexandre Desplat
  • Best Cinematography- Robert D. Yeoman
  • Best Costume Design- Milena Canonero
  • Best Film Editing- Barney Pilling
  • Best Makeup- Frances Hannon, Mark Coulier

Guardians of the Galaxy – DVD 13135

  • Best Visual Effects- Stephane Ceretti, Nicolas Aithadi, Jonathan Fawkner, Paul Corbould
  • Best Makeup- Elizabeth Yianni-Georgiou, David White

How to Train Your Dragon 2 – DVD 13059

  • Best Animated Feature Film

Ida – DVD 12907

  • Best Foreign Language Film- Pawel Pawlikowski
  • Best Cinematography- Lukasz Zal, Ryszard Lenczewski

The Judge – DVD 13226

  • Best Supporting Actor- Robert Duvall

Maleficent – DVD 13048

  • Best Costume Design- Anna B. Sheppard

Nightcrawler – DVD 13250

  • Best Original Screenplay- Dan Gilroy

X-Men: Days of Future Past – DVD 12948

  • Best Visual Effects- Richard Stammers, Lou Pecora, Tim Crosbie, Cameron Waldbauer

Special thanks to Media Coordinator Mary Reeves for her work to compile this list. Enjoy Oscar Night, and see you at the movies!

Philomathesian Banner Finds a Cozy Home

Monday, February 9, 2015 3:37 pm

In November, Claudia Walpole, a textile conservator came to ZSR Library and did a conservation assessment of our Philomathesian banner. The Philomathesians were a literary society on the old campus. Claudia discovered the banner was painted by abolitionist David Bustill Bowser (1820-1900) because she found his name was on a small shard of paint that had fallen off the banner. It turns out that Bowser, a free black man, was a cousin of Frederick Douglass whose home was on the underground railroad.

Bowser was a portrait painter, who painted banners during the Civil War for black regiments as well as for other organizations as an income. ZSR Archivist, Rebecca Petersen, researched this and discovered this banner was purchased by women from an early sister school of Wake Forest, Oxford Female Seminary (first President was also Samuel Wait). The Oxford Female Seminary’s Clio Society purchased this banner as a gift for their brothers at Wake Forest. The banner was painted on both sides of a piece of silk. Over the past 100 years, the silk has started to decompose and tear. The paint on both sides of the banner have cracked off into scattered pieces of a jigsaw-like puzzle. The serious preservation issues are self evident, and it doesn’t seem like all the king’s men and all the king’s horses can put them back together again.

Philomathesian banner menioned

-exerpt about the banner from the Philomathesian ledger

In March, 2014, Wake Forest Magazine did a piece called “Finding A Piece of History” about this banner. The banner was also named as one of North Carolina’s Endangered artifacts by the North Carolina Preservation Consortium.

Philomathesian banner in archival box for safe storage

-the Philomathesian banner in the new box

I recently began work on an over-sized archival box (46×46″) to store this banner. I ordered a pre-made box, but after Claudia Walpole, the conservator visited, she advised including the wooden rod with the banner in the box. When the box arrived, I enlarged the box, to create space to accommodate the wooden rod, and also made a holder to keep the rod in place. I lined the box with six layers of thin foam padding, topped with a layer of muslin and archival tissue. After the banner was carefully placed in the box, the same layers of padding was placed on top. The Philomathesian banner will be stored in an Archives storage area for now. Cozy as a bug in a rug, this banner now awaits restoration.

A Tipping Point for HvZ!

Sunday, February 8, 2015 10:46 am

After each Humans v Zombies event, I like to write a Gaz post on the event just to keep a record of the event, but this time I’m writing to talk about what looks like a tipping point in the event. The Spring 2014 HvZ had 120 participants, this year we had 158 (and last Fall we broke our record, surpassing 200 participants at an event!) While those numbers are great, what caught my attention was the participation by students from UNC, (they brought 40 students) UNC Central, (they brought 12 students) UNC-G, and NC State, each with just a few participants. While UNC has joined us in the past for the Spring event, we have never had this level of participation from this many schools! We consumed 20 pizzas, said goodbyes to two senior student leaders of the event, Brandon West from WFU and Tanner Fadero from UNC, and found volunteers to lead next year’s events. We also had door prizes (donated Nerf blasters) and a visit from the event’s creator, WFU alumnus John Walsh!

One unexpected cool addition to the event was a student with a Go Pro camera mounted on them to capture footage of the event! I hope ZSR can purchase some Go Pro cameras for student checkout in the future!

I want to thank the faithful volunteers who help with this event every semester! Susan Smith, Mary Beth Lock, Tim Mitchell, David Link and Chris Burris! And a shout out to Le’Ron Byrd who has not missed one of these events since he became the ZSR fellow! We now offer HvZ to our students in the Fall, Spring and Summer, and we host a joint event each summer for the LENS and Ben Franklin Fellows and another joint event for SPARC and the participants in the International Student Orientation. These hard working volunteers, along with the Student Activities Funds we apply for each year, make it possible for us to host these events for large numbers of students with very few staff and very little money!

Here is a link to Susan Smith’s amazing photos of the event!

5 Questions for Le’Ron Byrd

Friday, January 30, 2015 9:37 am

Le'Ron Byrd talks with Maggie Perez Vincente ('15)

Welcome to our 5 Questions series! These mini-interviews introduce our dedicated staff and faculty, and share behind-the-scenes stories about the work that we love to do! In this installment, we caught up with the ZSR Library Fellow, Le’Ron Byrd (’14). As the ZSR Library Fellow, Le’Ron has worked with the ZSR Library Administrative Team in a year-long position as a full-time staff member of the university.

Le’Ron, you also worked with ZSR as a student assistant during your undergraduate experience. How has your view of ZSR changed from working here as a student assistant to your current experience as the ZSR Fellow?

I worked as a student assistant in Access Services throughout my undergraduate career and I thoroughly enjoyed interacting with people who approached the main desk. As a student assistant, I had the unique opportunity of getting to know not only my immediate supervisors but some of the library staff. They truly are amazing people and are enthusiastic about their jobs on a daily basis. What changed once I became the Fellow was my overall perception of the staff and faculty here at ZSR. I learned that that each individual here in the library (even those who work behind the scenes) are committed to working hard towards bringing ZSR’s mission– to help students, staff, and faculty succeed– to life. It is honestly something that amazes me every day I come into work.

As the ZSR Fellow, you have a hand in work that goes on behind the scenes and in the public eye . . . What have been some of your favorite contributions?

It’s hard to identify a particular favorite project because it’s not about the actual project to me, it’s about having the opportunity to collaborate with others. I mean, let’s be real… ZSR is home to the best staff and faculty here at Wake Forest. Everyone in this building is excited at every opportunity to show why ZSR is the heart of our campus. It shows during Wake the Library– which would be my favorite “project” if I had to choose.

What’s next, and what’s your best advice for the next ZSR Fellow?

Next is continuing to work in academia. I was so sure I wanted to go right into law school next year but being a Wake Forest Fellow has taught me that I still have a lot more to learn about myself before embarking on my career. Thus, the best advice I have for the next ZSR Fellow would be to come into this position open-minded about yourself. Do your best to not visualize your time as the ZSR fellow as a means to an end. You can discover so many opportunities during your tenure as the fellow.

Has your opinion of libraries or librarians changed? How so?

Oh absolutely! I now know how complex libraries are and how far along ZSR is, as it relates to other academic libraries. In particular, I’ve learned how many different departments exist inside of libraries and how they all function together to make the institution work. I mean… working at a library has defeated my preconceived stereotypes of librarians too. ZSR librarians are so much more than people who shelve the books and are louder than most people imagine! They’re actually quite humorous.

What are some of your favorite ZSR memories?

(smiles) As a student during Finals Week watching the sun rise in the Atrium, after pulling an all-nighter. Although pulling the all-nighter was quite terrible, watching the sun rise in the Atrium made the painful experience a little better. My second favorite memory happened as the ZSR Fellow in November. I helped bring ZSR to China alongside the Wake Forest Advantage Program. While in China, all I could think about was my first day working in ZSR as a student assistant in 2010. I just never thought I would have gone from being a student assistant in ZSR to an advocate for ZSR in different countries.

 

The Office of the President is currently accepting applications for the 2015-2016 Z. Smith Reynolds Library Fellow. For more information, or to apply, visit Wake Forest Fellows Program. Applications are due by February 6th.

Announcing RootsMOOC: A Free Online Genealogy Course

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 2:47 pm

If you’re like me, researching your family history has been one of those fascinating pastimes that have always seemed just out of reach. There are about a million different places to start and just as many different ways to get overwhelmed. Without a little guidance, it’s easy to write off genealogy as one of those projects that are just too big for one person.

We in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library wanted to change that. We wanted to convert hesitant researchers like me into knowledgeable, confident family historians. To do this, ZSR collaborated with the fantastic librarians at the State Library of North Carolina to create a free online genealogy course, RootsMOOC, which is now open for enrollment to the first 5,000 learners who sign up.

Interested? Sign up here! http://bit.ly/RootsMOOC

Through video interviews, tutorials, discussions, and structured learning activities, we’ll learn the very basics of genealogy research, such as the best places to get started, how to stay organized, and what kinds of documents and search tools you’ll encounter along the way. We’ll all share our research progress and help each other overcome roadblocks as we share our best tips and tricks in the online discussion forums. Librarians, archivists, and other experts from North Carolina and around the United States will be participating right alongside us, answering questions and pointing us all in the right direction.

If you’ve been looking for a place to get started on your family history research, RootsMOOC just might be the thing you’ve been waiting for. We can’t wait to get started!

When does the course start? How long does it last? RootsMOOC will run from March 23 to June 1, 2015.

How much does it cost? Nothing! RootsMOOC is 100% free!

How much time will I need to devote each week? That depends. We feel that the best way to learn is by doing, so we encourage all participants to do their own research concurrently with the course. This might involve calling up family members, visiting physical libraries, and diving into online repositories, all of which can take some time. There are no grades, however, so you’re free to spend as much or as little time on this course as you like.

How do I sign up? Enroll here.

What if I find I can’t keep up with the course? No worries. Life is busy! If you find that you’ve fallen behind, you’ll always be able to go back to the course later. The discussions might be closed by then, but all of the content should still be there. If you want to drop the course altogether, it’s easy to do that, too.

Virtual Browsing in the Catalog

Friday, January 23, 2015 8:39 am

With the increasing numbers of electronic materials available in the catalog, many faculty and students (and librarians) lament the loss of the serendipity that comes from browsing the shelves and finding unknown material. While walking the stacks is by no means dead, a reliance on only print sources can now mean that you miss important publications that may only exist electronically. Fear not, however, you can browse the shelves of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library virtually, so to speak, using the features of the online catalog. Below are some hints for those who want to try it out.

From the catalog, you can go to any record and use the links within the record to browse similar items.

  • Author’s Name: See all the other books in the catalog by that author.
  • Subjects: Most books have assigned subject headings, and each heading is a link. If you see a subject that looks particularly relevant, click it and see what other items in the catalog also have that subject.
  • Call Number: The call numbers are also links. You can virtually see what would be on the shelf next to your item. Many e-books have Library of Congress call numbers specifically to enable this kind of browsing.
  • Similar Items: This box on the right side of the results screen shows items with similar subjects and call numbers to your item.

All these things should allow you to easily find other materials related to your research right from your computer screen. You will have access to print books, e-books, items from Offsite Storage and fully online items such as government documents and primary source material from databases. Happy browsing!

Senior Showcase to Return in April

Friday, January 23, 2015 8:36 am

Senior Showcase 2014 Honorees (L to R): Ryan Whittington, Christopher Earle, David Inczauskis, Rachel Cumbest

On April 21, ZSR will host the sixth annual Senior Showcase to celebrate outstanding research and artistic theses or projects completed by Wake Forest University undergraduates. Since 2010, the Showcase has featured the research of 20 former students, representing 12 academic fields, from philosophy to theatre to anthropology to chemistry. As an additional recognition of each student’s achievement, winners will receive a $1,000 prize.

The Showcase gives students the opportunity to share their research or projects before the Wake Forest community at a public event. A committee of library faculty will select up to five students, one per College division, from a pool of nominees recommended by College faculty. Projects in progress or completed during the 2014-2015 academic year are eligible. The review committee will evaluate submissions using the following criteria:

Research
  • Clear statement of purpose
  • Evidence of thorough research
  • Credible sources
  • Development of the idea
Presentation
Written
  • Well organized
  • Well written
  • Sound reasoning
Artistic
  • Skill/aptitude
  • Interpretation
Impact
  • Originality
  • Creativity
  • Importance to the field
  • Strength of the faculty advisor’s recommendation, summarizing the above Impact areas

Look for additional details and a formal call for nominations in February. Contact Molly Keener with any specific inquiries. Plan now to nominate your top senior students’ theses and projects!

Library Lecture Series, Spring 2015

Friday, January 23, 2015 8:36 am
  • Gracie Harrington, 2014 Wake Forest student recipient of the Building the Dream Award, will present the Annual Martin Luther King Lecture.
    Thursday, January 29, 4 p.m.
    ZSR Library Auditorium (Room 404, Reynolds Wing)
  • Pamela Howland, Wake Forest Department of Music, and her husband Wendell Myers will present “Chopin’s Nocturnes: A Fusion of Music and Visual Art.”
    Monday, February 23, 4 p.m.
    ZSR Ammons Gallery (Room 401, Reynolds Wing)
  • Jim Otteson, Executive Director of the BB&T Center for the Study of Capitalism and Teaching, Wake Forest School of Business, will discuss his recently released book The End of Socialism.
    Wednesday, February 25, 4 p.m.
    ZSR Library Auditorium (Room 404, Reynolds Wing)
  • Earth Day Lecture, Details TBA

Visit the Lecture Series website for more information.

Dean’s List Gala

Friday, January 23, 2015 8:35 am

The second annual Dean’s List Gala will be held in ZSR Library on Friday, February 20 at 7 p.m. The event was initiated in 2014 to celebrate the academic success of Wake Forest seniors and was held during the spring Family Weekend. This year’s event is being expanded to honor all sophomores, juniors and seniors who achieved dean’s list honors in spring 2014 or fall 2014. All faculty are invited to attend the Gala to celebrate these students’ accomplishments!


Pages
About
Categories
Archives
Awards
Events
General
Instruction
Outreach
Staff
Technology
Tags
Archives
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
May 2006
April 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
October 2005
August 2005
July 2005

Powered by WordPress.org, protected by Akismet. Blog with WordPress.com.